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The logic is fallacious, for it does not regard the polysemy of the term "spirit" and thus creates a famous fallacy of ambiguity. The Scripture distinguishes uncreated Spirit - God, and created spirits, angels (Hebrews 1:14), demons (Mark 1:27), human souls (for sometimes also human souls are called "spirits" /Hebrews 12:23/). Thus, when ...


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The argument is flawed because it doesn’t take into account how the language is used and the overarching context. Stating “God is spirit”, is correct. But God also lives inside the body of believers “Do you not know that you are God’s temple and that God’s Spirit dwells in you? If anyone destroys God’s temple, God will destroy him. For God’s temple is holy,...


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Valid vs Sound I believe this argument is valid, but it is not sound. (terms defined here) It is valid in that if the premises are true, the conclusion logically follows. However, I suggest that it would be overplaying the evidence to claim that premises 1 & 4 are certain. If the premises are not true, the argument is not sound. Here is an example of a ...


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People are reading far too much significance into this one verse. Look earlier in the chapter, at verses 36 and 37: And as they thus spake, Jesus himself stood in the midst of them, and saith unto them, Peace be unto you. But they were terrified and affrighted, and supposed that they had seen a spirit. In verse 39, Jesus is simply trying to remove their ...


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A Biblical Unitarian probably wouldn't make an argument like this, and the reason turns on the meaning of 'spirit' in the relevant passages, which is a word with multiple meanings in both the ancient Greek and ancient Hebrew. This Biblical Unitarian commentary distinguishes 15 different senses of the Greek term 'pneuma' ('spirit' in English). For John 4:24, ...


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“Which premise (or step) of the argument is flawed” - Step 4, ‘Therefore, Jesus is not a spirit”. Jesus did not say he was not a Spirit. He said, a spirit does not have flesh and bone. And that is absolutely correct, it doesn’t. They don’t. You are making a deduction, but your ‘therefore’, your conclusion fails to consider the whole verse. Look at at that ...


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The entire premise of this question is flawed. Jesus did not deny being a God with this statement; in this fourth statement of comfort/consolation (in as many verses), Jesus is affirming that he is indeed flesh. Compare this to the passage about Jesus walking on the water. There (in Mark and Matthew) the word fantasm is used instead of pneuma, but the form ...


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“I thank you, Father, Lord of heaven and earth, that you have hidden these things from the wise and understanding and revealed them to little children; yes, Father, for such was your gracious will." - Luke 10:21 In context here the little children are the disciples. "Blessed are the eyes that see what you see", Jesus tells them just one ...


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I would critique the above answers methodologically in that they focus exclusively on word meaning. An alternate methodological approach would combine a focus on word meaning with a focus on the overall meaning of the verse. Some elementary observations on the verse's meaning are the following: Adam & Eve were sinning and going through the sin-guilt ...


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I think the answer to this question is rather simple: Luke 10:22 is talking about PEOPLE not the Godhead, not heavenly beings, etc. I am sure that all the angels in heaven know Jesus and the Father very well indeed - much better than anyone here. Thus, this verse teaches a very simple fact - we can only know God as He is revealed to us by God. ...


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The Son knows the Father through the Holy Spirit. The Father knows the Son through the Holy Spirit. We know this, for this is how we know the Father and the Son. In Spirit. Else we know not God at all. God is [a] Spirit. And they that worship Him must worship [him] in Spirit and in truth. [John 4:24 KJV] ... who through the eternal Spirit offered himself ...


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for the Holy Spirit will teach you in that very hour what you ought to say." Luke 12:12 for it will not be you speaking, but the Spirit of your Father speaking through you. Matthew 10:20 Perhaps these passages don’t fit the prescribed understanding of what (or who) the Holy Spirit is, but they carry the weight of those Jesus ministered to as his ...


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This might be a possible translation! And they heard the VOICE of the LORD God walking( TRAVELING) in the garden in the cool (WIND) of the day: and Adam and his wife hid themselves from the presence of the LORD God amongst the trees of the garden. The VOICE of The LORD GOD Traveling in the WIND of the day?


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I know that according to greek, penetrates means "occurrence" it pierces διϊκνούμενος (diiknoumenos) Verb - Present Participle Middle or Passive - Nominative Masculine Singular Strong's Greek 1338: To pass through (to), come through (to), pierce. From dia and the base of hikanos; to reach through, i.e. Penetrate. There is nothing tricky about the ...


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