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Frequently, an "Angel of the LORD" will appear in passages throughout the Bible to bring a message to an individual. In these instances, the speech used is always that of God himself. Tradition held that messages came with the full authority, weight, and force of the person who sent it. This messenger was an extension of the originator of the messenger ...


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There are three possible reasons to think it is God who is speaking to Moses, in Exodus 24:1: 1. In the context of Exodus, there is that great "sermon" beginning in Exodus 20:22. That is going on and on and there is no another "And the LORD said to Moses ..." or anything similar until Exodus 24:1. This makes me think that the fact that it is God who is ...


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Revelation 1:5 To him who loves us and has freed us from our sins by his blood, 6and has made us to be a kingdom and priests to serve his God and Father—to him be glory and power for ever and ever! Amen. 7“Look, he is coming with the clouds,” and “every eye will see him, even those who pierced him”; and all peoples on earth “will mourn because of him.” So ...


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This question highlights a genuine textual challenge: ancient Greek texts did not include quotation marks. Michael Palmer, a Hellenistic Greek linguist, notes, “While it’s usually very easy to see where a quote begins, finding the end of the quote is much more challenging because there was no punctuation, and no grammatical convention, to indicate this.” ...


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