New answers tagged

0

The last 12 verses of Mark have long been a subject of debate, with 3 viewpoints emerging as most common: They represent the original ending of the Gospel, as written by Mark They were written by another author who was considered sufficiently authoritative to speak on the matter They represent a later addition to the text For my part, I do not believe ...


1

This question really doesn't deal with hermeneutics, so I'm not sure why it was passed over here. The question has everything to do with one's choice of Biblical manuscripts. There are thousands of Biblical manuscripts. Most manuscripts agree, but there are a minority of manuscripts, especially those of the codex sinaiticus, codex vaticanus, and codex ...


2

I find this phenomenon fascinating—so much so that I once made a couple videos about it. The phenomenon is discussed here, and my conclusions from it here. Discerning the relationship among the Synoptic Gospels (Matthew, Mark, Luke) is known as the Synoptic Problem—at the bottom of the post I’ve shared links to several of the major views, as discussed on ...


0

Why is Matthew changing the text and making it less harsh? Allow me to quote from the NAS: Mark 10:17-18: As He was setting out on a journey, a man ran up to Him and knelt before Him, and asked Him, “Good Teacher, what shall I do to inherit eternal life?” And Jesus said to him, “Why do you call Me good? No one is good except God alone. Matthew 19:16-17a: ...


1

Direct evidence The closest thing to what you're looking for would be Shem Tob Matthew. It's a copy of the Gospel of Matthew in Hebrew that was written into a 14th century Jewish polemic against Christianity. George Howard, who published an extensive review of Shem Tob Matthew (see link above), contended that the Hebrew text was not a translation but was a ...


2

There is another theory giving the Gospel of Matthew a partial priority. This theory is that the Gospel of Matthew has evolved, knowing more than one redaction. One first redaction was similar to what has been called "Q" in the 19th Century. This redaction may date very early. A later redaction (or more than one later redactions) included other ...


Top 50 recent answers are included