9

The context (see verse 6) justifies translating the v' as "but." Furthermore, it clearly demonstrates that she is not actually black but simply very darkly tanned. Do not stare at me because I am swarthy [i.e. dark], For the sun has burned me. My mother’s sons were angry with me; They made me caretaker of the vineyards, But I have not taken care ...


9

Does Song of Songs 8:6 contain a reference to YHWH? Yes ... and no. "Yes", there is a use of the short form of the divine name, found suffixed to the word of Song 8:6, שַׁלְהֶבֶתְיָה šalhebetyāh, combining the rare word for "flame", שַׁלְהֶבֶת šalhebet (on this analysis, found only here and in Job 15:30 and Ezekiel 21:3) with the final -yah representing the ...


7

The consonantal text, דדיך, can be read דַּדַּיִך, from דַּד "nipple" (Ezekiel 23:3,8,21). This was the reading used in translating דדיך as μαστοί σου. The meaning "beloved" is consistently spelled דּוֹד in Song of Songs. The lack of the letter ו in this and all other cases in the book (1:4, 4:10, 7:13) renders all of them ambiguous between "love" and "...


5

Is a gentilic suffix normally used on non- place names (a la NET)? Yes, it's pretty common. So called gentilic suffixes in Hebrew indicate affiliation, not necessarily affiliation with a place. Is it reasonable to posit that the beloved may indeed be from Shunem/Shulem? It's definitely a possibility. One problem with the gentilic interpretation is that ...


4

According to Ibn Ezra it means a flame of God fire of a great flame: coals of a strong fire that comes from the force of the flame of Gehinnom. The cantillation symbol of the zakef gadol, which punctuates רִשְּׁפֵּי (coals of) teaches us about the word אֵשּׁ (fire) that it is connected to שַּׁלְהֶבֶתיָהּ, meaning fire of a great flame, [or a flame of God,...


4

The plural noun in classical Hebrew can do other "non-number" jobs than simply the plural of "majesty". One common one is the "plural of abstraction", and that is the way maḥămaddîm is typically understood here. Waltke-O'Connor para. 7.4.2(a) further refine this as refering to qualities: Cf. Joüon-Muraoka, who explain it precisely the same way: a "plural of ...


4

The KJV establishes it as all one sentence, beginning with לְרֵ֙יחַ֙; from Keil and Delitzsch's Commentary, To smell thy ointments are sweet shows that when this song is sung wine is presented and perfumes are sprinkled; but the love of the host is, for those who sing, more excellent than all. It is maintained that ריח signifies fragrance emitted,...


3

First of all, remember that this is poetry, erotic poetry, and the writer's intent is to be slyly suggestive, so trying to nail down a precise single meaning is not going to be super productive. Secondly, you should have backed up and asked what the prepositional mem (מ) "from" is doing before menishikot (נשיקות) in verse 2. What does "from the kisses" or "...


3

I just think someone should mention that earlier, more traditional, translations add the word "my" in front of love, interpreting this as referring to the beloved rather than to the abstract concept of love. The KJV, ASV, and NASB all do this. KJV: "I charge you, O ye daughters of Jerusalem, by the roes, and by the hinds of the field, that ye stir not up, ...


3

It has been said elsewhere that the Hebrew word 'tsav' in relation to 'turtle/dove' refers in Leviticus 11.29 to a creature that "creepeth upon the earth", with the specific creature being unidentified in the text. This comes directly from the Hebrew, having no connection with later Latin or derived English onomatopoeic interpretations for the 'turtle' in '...


3

1st of all, one has to see that this "love letter", between the "Beloved"-a type or figure of Solomon, but not Solomon himself, and the Shulamite, as a 'type' of the nation of Israel, of whom she is a 'daughter'. There are numerous textures and layers regarding the Song of Solomon; at it's basic level it's a "song" describing the intimacy between a soul and ...


3

In context to the poem, we find in Song of Songs ( שִׁ֥יר הַשִּׁירִ֖ים ) Chapter 1 : verse 5 - The Woman who loves My-Beloved (Dodi, דּוֹדִ֥י) is questioning the contributions of Maidens who supposedly love God by examining their physical lack of hard labor for His city Yerushalem. Song of Songs ( שִׁ֥יר הַשִּׁירִ֖ים ) - Chapter 1:7 [MT] "Tell me, you ...


3

The names that the two lovers have for each other are many in the famous love poem of the Song of Songs, such as: "My beloved", SS 1:13, 2:8, 5:16 "My darling", SS 1:9, 15, 4:1, 6:4 "My friend", SS 5:16. "My bride", SS 4:9 "My dove", SS 2:16 "My sister", SS 4:9 Most beautiful", SS 5:9, 6:1 &...


3

Even today, one might be a 'brother' to a 'sister' in a church congregation. And then marry the sister, making her a spouse. The spirituality of the Song of Solomon exceeds natural relationships and transcends the limitations of them, to express what is true of Christ and the Bride of Christ. No, it should not be read as 'romantic'. It is setting forth ...


3

Since I was asked to put my comment into an answer/post, I will do so: Nothing to do with incest, but it is about sublimity of romantic love, when love is sublimated and refined, and “sister” is a symbol-word of this sublimity. Similarly, in another inspired text of roughly the same period, Homer’s “Iliad”, Andromache says to her husband Hector: “Hector, ...


2

This book is attributed to Solomon by a very old tradition. Yet as noted in this video from the Bible Project, min 1:03 onwards ... you do have to admit Solomon is a very odd candidate as the author of this book, given the fact he had seven hundred wives. For the lovers in the Song of Songs, they are the only ones in the world for each other. referencing 1 ...


2

Superscripts were added to many of the Old Testament books and psalms by scribes, mostly during the Exilic or post-Exilic period. The superscript to Song of Solomon, "The Song of Songs, which is Solomon’s," only says that it is the best song ("song of songs") that belongs to Solomon. This reference to Solomon could mean that Solomon wrote it or that it was ...


2

The strongest Biblical parallel is found here: And Isaac brought her into his mother Sarah's tent, and took Rebekah, and she became his wife; and he loved her: and Isaac was comforted after his mother's death. - Gen. 24:67 This is a little bit different that the Song of Songs, but the premise in the same. Symbolically, the apple tree is something ...


2

Pascal I have made the same observation and I was stunned to see how the LXX consistently translates דדיך to "breasts" rather than "love". However, the LXX in my opinion goes too far, and I cant help but think that the MT's version is superior than the LXX (in this particular instance). So while I agree that the term alone is ambiguous as @ba has pointed out,...


2

"I don't know my soul" is a perfectly valid way to read the text. Job 9:21 is a close parallel (לֹא אֵדַע נַפְשִׁי), from which we can deduce that "I don't know my soul" is an expression of confusion or strong emotion. Here the words לֹא יָדַעְתִּי נַפְשִׁי are the equivalent but conjugated as perfect instead of imperfect. This reading is suggested by E. S. ...


2

The comparison between the mentions of רקה in Song and in Judges invite us to agree with the conclusion that the Shulamite's anatomic part of the head is the temple. Moreover, the Hebrew conceptual root (including some allomorphic variants of the expressed idea, namely רקע, and רקח) cover the meaning of 'to grind, to stamp, to reduce an element into very ...


2

You present two translation possibilities, both linguistically acceptable, theoretically: (a) "[...] who feeds [his flock] among the lilies. Until the day breathe and the shadows flee turn and make yourself resemblant [...]."; (b) "[...] who feeds [his flock] among the lilies until the day breathe and the shadows flee. Turn and make yourself resemblant [......


2

In Song of Songs 5:7 - Why did the Watchmen wound the beloved woman? Song of Songs (שִׁ֥יר הַשִּׁירִ֖ים) - Chapter 5: verse 7 [MT] The-Watchmen who patrol the city found me; they smote me and wounded me; the-Watchmen of the walls took my jewelry off me. ( מְצָאֻ֧נִי הַשֹּֽׁמְרִ֛ים הַסֹּֽבְבִ֥ים בָּעִ֖יר הִכּ֣וּנִי פְצָע֑וּנִי נָֽשְׂא֤וּ אֶת־רְדִידִי֙ ...


2

The watchmen performed policing work. They mistook her for a bad woman of the night. John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible they smote me, they wounded me; taking her for a night walker, they gave her ill words and hard blows this was not very becoming watchmen to use those of the city in this manner; for, as Plato says, keepers of cities should be mild ...


2

Sometimes the Hebrew bible flips from female plural to male plural as male plural is seen as more abstract. Another example of this is "וּמִ֨תּוֹכָ֔הּ דְּמ֖וּת אַרְבַּ֣ע חַיּ֑וֹת וְזֶה֙ מַרְאֵֽיהֶ֔ן דְּמ֥וּת אָדָ֖ם לָהֵֽנָּה׃ וְאַרְבָּעָ֥ה פָנִ֖ים לְאֶחָ֑ת וְאַרְבַּ֥ע כְּנָפַ֖יִם לְאַחַ֥ת לָהֶֽם׃" "And from within it was the appearance of four ...


2

Song of Solomon 8:1 Oh, that you were like my brother, Who nursed at my mother’s breasts! If I should find you outside, I would kiss you; I would not be despised. It does seem to indicate that if she kissed someone not her brother outside, she would be despised. It should be read from the mindset of the wishful thinking of an innocent girl with no sexual ...


1

Yes he was dark complexioned, but he did not say he was black. The Shulamite said that.


1

The Mirriam-Webster dictionary definition of poetry includes the following: writing that formulates a concentrated imaginative awareness of experience in language chosen and arranged to create a specific emotional response through meaning, sound, and rhythm The Old Testament books are not organized chronologically but by category. The categories are: The ...


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