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16

This is an excellent question that has plagued the Christian church for millennia with copious arguments on both sides. What are the Biblical facts: There is no explicit Biblical command against alcohol, except for Nazarenes like john the Baptist. Grape juice (in various forms) was an important part of the eastern diet both socially and physiologically. ...


16

I will base this answer on the premise that an activity cannot be a reason to be excluded from the kingdom of God unless there is something sinful about it. This is a premise that it is reasonable to hold in light of verses such as: Behold, the Lord's hand is not shortened, that it cannot save, or his ear dull, that it cannot hear; 2 but your iniquities ...


14

Onan's sin was entirely related to his refusal to perform his levirate duty. Quickly about the other three: Coitus interruptus is not masturbation. It is a (very unreliable) method of birth control. Onan was attempting not to get Tamar pregnant because he did not want to provide an heir for his deceased older brother. It was not "theft of Tamar's child." ...


14

Can a person lose their salvation according to 2 Peter 2:20-22? The short answer is "Yes, most definitely." The following response may be unpalatable to some. However, it is certainly not my intent to wound those who believe we simply cannot be lost once we receive salvation in Christ. The far greater imperative here is for the truth to be told, ...


13

There are several matters here that are crucial - First, 1 John 1:8 should never be read without also reading 1 John 1:10 - 8 If we say we have no sin [noun], we deceive ourselves, and the truth is not in us. ... 10 If we say we have not sinned [verb], we make Him out to be a liar, and His word is not in us. Thus we are all sinners both because of what we ...


10

'Clean' (טָהֵר) in Leviticus 16 The Hebrew verb טָהֵר / taher is used consistently throughout the Hebrew Bible in terms of cleansing or purifying, and so in the context of Leviticus 16 the stated meaning is that by performing the described ritual, the High Priest would have his sins cleansed and he would become pure. This ritual purification was required ...


9

The seeming contradiction is from not paying careful attention to the verb tenses; the continuous action of the present tense in particular. 1 John 1:8-10 isn't so much of an issue in an English translation. The issue is understanding 1 John 3:9 Doeth no sin [KJV] (ἁμαρτιαν οὐ ποιει [hamartian ou poiei]). Linear present active indicative as in verse 4 like ...


8

The Greek behind your question is “τινων (of whomsoever) αφητε (you may remit) τας (the) αμαρτιας (sins) αφιενται (they are remitted) αυτοις (to them) αν τινων (whoesoever) κρατητε (you may retain) κεκρατηνται (they have been retained)”. This verse is often understood as equivalent to that found in other places such as Matthew 16:19: “ο (whatever) εαν δησης ...


8

τὸν μὴ γνόντα ἁμαρτίαν ὑπὲρ ἡμῶν ἁμαρτίαν ἐποίησεν....1 "For he caused him who knew nothing of sin to be sin for us...." The preceding vv. 18-20 make it clear that 'he' is θεός (God), and 'him who knew nothing of sin' in this context is Χριστός (Christ). The presence of the article (τὸν) with the participle γνόντα indicates that it functions as a ...


8

We do not inherit sin, the following is copied from Xeno's comment at Polyhat's answer: Scripture plainly teaches that sin is not inherited: “[T]he son shall not bear the iniquity of the father” (Eze. 18:20). Everyone is responsible for their own conduct (Rom. 14:12). Sinfulness begins in one's youth (Gen. 8:21; Jer. 3:25). Children must reach a level of ...


7

It is helpful to understand the purpose(s) of the Mosaic Law. Quickly: It was intended to point people to their need for a Savior (Gal 3:19; Rom 5:20). It was intended to highlight their sinful nature (Rom 7:7). It taught many aspects of God and peoples' relationship to him. For examples, the sacrificial system was a reminder of humanity's need for a ...


7

Jews reject the argument that Cain's sacrifice was insufficient because it did not involve blood, and they have some good arguments. Leviticus clearly spells out various "grain offerings," and there is even one example of a "sin offering" where the poor people were allowed to offer grain instead of an animal sacrifice. (See Lev. 5:11-13.) The traditional ...


7

Good question. Strictly speaking, we don't know how commonly held the belief was (as we do not have a huge number of documents from that exact time period, and certainly "opinion surveys" didn't exist then). However, the IVP Commentary does a good job of explaining the probable background based on rabbinic comments from the following centuries. I will ...


7

The answer can be gleaned from other places in the Bible where King David and his sin is spoken of. Paul writes in Romans 4:5-8: “But to him that worketh not, but believeth on him that justifieth the ungodly, his faith is counted for righteousness. Even as David also describeth the blessedness of the man unto whom God imputeth righteousness without works, ...


6

Rabbi Samson Raphael Hirsch, in his commentary to Leviticus 12, explains the sin-offering of the new mother (and the nazirite’s, in that chapter) as a sort of prophylactic offering: At the moment the woman (or the former nazirite) re-enters ordinary human interactions after her period of impurity, she brings this offering to symbolize her commitment to ...


6

The writer of Hebrews analyses why Abel's sacrifice was accepted and Cain's wasn't. Hebrews 11:4 By faith Abel offered to God a more excellent sacrifice than Cain, through which he obtained witness that he was righteous, God testifying of his gifts; and through it he being dead still speaks. The difference between the two sacrifices was that Abel brought ...


6

Sacred prostitution was practised widely throughout the Mediterranean world and probably originated as a fertility ritual. The prostitute, whether male or female, could charge a fee on behalf of the temple for which he or she worked. These are not common prostitutes, but sacred prostitutes, for which the Hebrew language uses different words. The practice ...


6

In the ancient world papyrus was a valuable and expensive commodity. For ephemeral scribblings people used erasable wax tablets, or they wrote on the ground with a stick or a finger. There is the famous story of how the great mathematician Archimedes was drawing geometric figures in the dust when he was murdered by an invading Roman soldier. This was around ...


6

My dad, who is a pastor, has an interesting theory as of why. He says that prior to the Fall, they were clothed in light as a result of walking with God. They were physically naked, but because they were clothed in God's glory, they couldn't see that they were naked. This idea is rooted in Exodus 34:9-25, where Moses' face was radiant from being in God's ...


6

Since this is a hermeneutic site (not a theological discussion), I will limit the answer to Paul’s intent and theology. Paul does acknowledge people are incapable of not sinning or keeping the Jewish law. “For by works of the law no human being will be justified in his sight, since through the law comes knowledge of sin.” (Romans 3:20, ESV); ”for all have ...


6

At https://biblehub.com/1_corinthians/6-10.htm, 10 versions use the word "reviler" (G3060) and 10 versions use the word "abusers" or "abusive". Berean Study Bible nor thieves, nor the greedy, nor drunkards, nor verbal abusers, nor swindlers, will inherit the kingdom of God. This Greek word appears another time in 1 Corinthians ...


5

"Faith" here is used in a broad way. The fuller context is: [21] It is good not to eat meat or drink wine or do anything that causes your brother to stumble. [22] The faith that you have, keep between yourself and God. Blessed is the one who has no reason to pass judgment on himself for what he approves. [23] But whoever has doubts is condemned ...


5

She was not unclean because she had a baby. She was unclean because there was an issue of blood that came out of her when she gave birth (see Leviticus 12:7). Its the blood, not the baby, that's deemed unclean.


5

The answer to your question is best examined by looking at Onan's sin in the context of the exchange between Judah and Tamar and requires a good understanding and background of the place of women in ancient middle eastern culture and the purpose of Leverite marriage practices. We must remember that this culture had no medicare and no social security. ...


5

The sudden shame for Adam's (and Eve)nakedness is an allegory, the physical of the spiritual. Not just the gained knowledge from eating the fruit. First, they were commanded not to eat the fruit from the tree, nor touch it (Genesis 3:3) This is confirmed when the Lord went searching for Adam in Genesis 3:11 "And He said, "Who told you that you were naked? ...


5

1. Question Restatement: In Genesis, why did Adam and Eve become ashamed when they realized they were naked after eating from the Tree of the Knowledge of Good and Evil? 2. Possible Answer - It is shameful for the one who knows good, but does not do it: The Tree of Knowledge was Knowledge of BOTH Righteousness AND Evil: NKJV, James 4:17 - Therefore, to ...


5

God sent Nathan to David to expose his sin and pronounce God’s judgment upon him: “Now therefore the sword shall never depart from thine house; because thou hast despised me, and hast taken the wife of Uriah the Hittite to be thy wife. Thus saith the LORD, Behold, I will raise up evil against thee out of thine own house, and I will take thy wives before ...


5

Most of these questions ask for subjective answers, but in the spirit of this site I will try to answer from a hermeneutical perspective. :) Is there anything inherently wrong with alcohol or getting drunk? There is no prohibition in scripture to the drinking of alcohol, but drunkenness. This does suggest that the drinking of alcohol itself is not inherently ...


5

Yes, of course, how otherwise? Moreover, it will be even worse for that person for "a servant who knows the will of his lord will be beaten more than a servant who does not know it" (cf. Luke 12:47). To claim, upon a wrongheaded interpretation of 1 Corinthians 3:15, that a person who has been enlightened by Holy Baptism and has become a Christian ...


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