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Jesus didn't give an approach to lust in the Sermon on the Mount. The point Jesus was making there was self-righteousness falls short. While lust isn't specifically listed, Jesus' way to deal with lust is in John 14-16. If you love me, you will keep my commandments. 16 And I will ask the Father, and he will give you another Helper, to be with you forever, ...


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Not at all. Jesus is, as He's very much wont to, employing rhetoric to make His teachings more memorable, and to drive the point through. (I think it's quite clear that Jesus didn't intend for us to be limbless, eye-less, etc. people, which we would be if we took this, and obeyed it literally.) Rather, He's teaching us to remove occasions of sin (things that ...


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First of all, children are not by-product of a marriage, they are blessings from God, just like we are not by-products of God's creation :) Answering your question regarding 1 Cor 7:14 Now to answer your question, let's look at the context of the verse. Paul has discussed marriage related topics with 2 categories of people: Believers who were not married ...


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Can the spouse of a believer be sanctified by simply being married to the believer? Answer: Unfortunately, No. Each of us is uniquely accountable to God and our salvation is not transferrable. I have seen several spouses of saints that do not obey God at all. How could they be saved through such negligence? 1 Corinthians 7:14, 15: For the unbelieving ...


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Let me quote 1 Cor 7:14 - For the unbelieving husband has been sanctified through his wife, and the unbelieving wife has been sanctified through her believing husband. Otherwise your children would be unclean, but as it is, they are holy. First, note that Paul is discussing the situation where a believer is married to an unbelieving spouse - this was ...


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I’ll offer a response in 2 parts: The semantic range of ἁγιάζω (“hagiazó”) Application of #1 to the passages in the OP Semantics I suggest that a one-size-fits-all definition of hagiazó (“to sanctify”) is unhelpful because it is inconsistent with the semantic range of the word found in the Bible. The word hagiazó can describe an event that happens once (...


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Are all followers of Christ guaranteed sanctification (1 Thess. 5:23-24 vs. 2 Peter 2:20-22)? Answer: Sanctification is contingent upon our sustained faith (1 Jn. 1:7, 9). That is, 1) No we are not guaranteed sanctification if we fall away (the point of 2 Pet. 2:20+), and 2) yes, we can most definitely lose our salvation if we choose to abandon it (Col. 1:23,...


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The answer to this question depends on what we mean by "sanctification". The word as used in the NT is NOT a process but an even that is almost synonymous with justification. [NOTE: the word sanctification has in modern theology a different meaning from that in the NT - its modern use is not wrong but simply different from the NT - see appendix ...


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Yes. Different Clearly so. Let’s look a little closer ... MAT 5:5 And seeing the multitudes, He went up on a mountain, and when He was seated His disciples came to Him Your quoted verse from Matthew are from what is commonly known as the sermon on the mount. Here Jesus is teaching Law, to the ‘nth’ degree, explaining it up to the highest standard - because ...


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Jesus was already pure, holy, and undefiled. He was sinless, and therefore we could say he had been "sanctified" already. But as we observe his life, we see that he exemplified, through his own behavior, the sanctification that his disciples needed. This was to show them how they might also be sanctified. For example, in Jesus' baptism, he ...


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The difference is only apparent, for Jesus does not say in a direct sense but in a metaphoric sense about "cutting one's hand" or "plucking one's eye", for it is not that hand or eye are tempting us, but a sinful desire is tempting us; thus, "cutting of hand" or "plucking of eye" means nothing else than killing the ...


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English Standard Version, John 17:19a And for their sake I consecrate myself This is a euphemism: Jesus consecrated/sanctified himself by going to the Cross. It alludes to the consecration in Exodus 13: 2 “Consecrate to me every firstborn male. The first offspring of every womb among the Israelites belongs to me, whether human or animal.” After the Cross,...


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The Matthew 5 passage is not a teaching on how to deal with sin here, it is a teaching about the severity and consequence of sin and that he gives no provision for sin (5:19-20). Jesus is essentially saying he is greater than Moses by comparing himself to the contemporary teachings. It is also full of hyperbolic language, you can figure the logic, it is ...


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1 Thessalonians 5:23-24 (ESV): 23 Now may the God of peace himself sanctify you completely, and may your whole spirit and soul and body be kept blameless at the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ. 24 He who calls you is faithful; he will surely do it. Unfortunately, some brethren were not faithful, they would fail to complete the sanctification process which ...


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You state that (...) it is implied that an unbelieving spouse, of a believer, may also be made holy in God's eyes but only if that spouse comes around to the believer's stance with God. It is also implied that the children of such an alliance can be sanctified merely by being a bi product of such a marriage. While that could be true from your perspective, ...


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