29

Abraham told his servants that He and Isaac would return because He knew that God could raise Isaac from the dead. Heb. 11:17-19, "17 By faith Abraham hath offered up Isaac, being tried, and the only begotten he did offer up who did receive the promises, 18 of whom it was said -- `In Isaac shall a seed be called to thee;' 19 reckoning that even out of ...


23

First of all, to address your question of whether it is an accurate translation, it certainly is. As it can be seen here, the Hebrew word is ונשובה, which comes from the word שוב, to return (Strong 7725). Secondly, you have suggested a number of excellent ways to understand such a statement, and I will try to source as many of them as I can: The pulpit ...


20

The wise men came after baby Jesus was presented in the temple. If you see a harmony of the Gospels, like Study Resources :: Harmony of the Gospels, you will find that the wise men came long after Jesus was presented in the temple. Presentation in the temple A woman who bore a son was ceremonially unclean for forty days (twice that if she bore a daughter ...


16

The answer is simple: Abraham was hiding his true intentions from Isaac - were he to know what he was trying to do with him he would surely protest. This is evident from verses 7-9: The fire and wood are here,” Isaac said, “but where is the lamb for the burnt offering?” Abraham answered, “God himself will provide the lamb for the burnt offering, my son.”...


10

'Clean' (טָהֵר) in Leviticus 16 The Hebrew verb טָהֵר / taher is used consistently throughout the Hebrew Bible in terms of cleansing or purifying, and so in the context of Leviticus 16 the stated meaning is that by performing the described ritual, the High Priest would have his sins cleansed and he would become pure. This ritual purification was required ...


8

In short, the verses are not talking about sacrificing (putting to death in offering) human children, but passing over of the firstborn to the service of God. The Keil and Delitzsch Biblical Commentary on the Old Testament regarding Numbers 18 states The practical confirmation of the priesthood of Aaron and his family, on the part of God, is very ...


7

Jews reject the argument that Cain's sacrifice was insufficient because it did not involve blood, and they have some good arguments. Leviticus clearly spells out various "grain offerings," and there is even one example of a "sin offering" where the poor people were allowed to offer grain instead of an animal sacrifice. (See Lev. 5:11-13.) The traditional ...


7

Leviticus 23:18 commands us to sacrifice ten animals only. The command is a collective command on the descendants of Israel to fulfill as a nation. The command is not on each individual separately. The language of Leviticus 23:2-36, which deals with the holidays, is plural imperative. A priori, this form could be interpreted either as commandments whose ...


7

The point in Hebrews 10 is not just "It is impossible for the blood of bulls and goats to take away sins." There is a bigger picture here related to typology. Here is the context: Hebrews 10:1 The law is only a shadow of the good things that are coming—not the realities themselves. For this reason it can never, by the same sacrifices repeated ...


6

The writer of Hebrews analyses why Abel's sacrifice was accepted and Cain's wasn't. Hebrews 11:4 By faith Abel offered to God a more excellent sacrifice than Cain, through which he obtained witness that he was righteous, God testifying of his gifts; and through it he being dead still speaks. The difference between the two sacrifices was that Abel brought ...


6

Although Paul does not use the same word for 'abolish' as Jesus in Matthew 5:17, I think it helpful to bear that verse in mind, as Paul did not intend to contradict what Jesus says: 17“Do not think that I have come to abolish the Law or the Prophets; I have not come to abolish them but to fulfill them. 18For truly, I say to you, until heaven and earth ...


6

Job lived 140 years (Job 42:16), a long life, similar to the patriarchs. For that reason it is said that he lived during the period of the patriarchs. During the patriarchal age, the head of the family also covered the function of offering sacrifices. In other words, he was the priest of his family. (1) So Job, conceived by the writer as living in ...


6

They were to eat the lamb roasted over fire because it was quick: the same reason they were to eat it with their cloak tucked into their belt, their sandals on their feet and their staff in their hand. “Eat it in haste; it is the LORD's Passover.” (Exodus 12:11) They did not know exactly when the LORD was going to call them out but they were to be prepared ...


4

The wisemen were not at the manger and Jesus' birth. They came later and found Mary and the baby in a home. At the time of his presentation at the temple, Mary and Joseph had not received the gift from the wiseman. It was probably within two years of his birth that the wiseman found him as Harod killed all the babies, 2 years and under around Bethlehem. ...


4

In addition to Soldarnal's point I would like to add that there is evidence that Jephthah's dagheter's request to "mourn her virginity" was an ancient cultic rite associated with the cult of Anath and Baa'l, The role of women in this rite is reminiscent of the part that the goddess Anat plays in mourning and searching for the dead Baal (GORDON UH 67 ...


4

While I like various points from a number of highly upvoted answers here, I do not feel any one of them captures the whole picture, so I'll offer a compilation of what I see as the primary points to answer the question itself, some of which will obviously overlap certain of these other answers. Possibilities Are these mistranslations of the original? It ...


4

According to Jewish tradition, the total number of bull sacrifices were 70 (13+12+11+10+9+8+7) to represent the 70 nations of the world - beyond Israel, and to protect those nations. Sukkot is also called the Feast of the Nations, when other nations would be welcomed. Traditional belief is that 35 of them represented the nations of Ishmael, and 35 ...


4

Is there an Old Testament basis for Hebrews 10:3? "But in those sacrifices there is a reminder of sins year by year."- Hebrews 10:3. Is there an Old Testament basis for Hebrews 10:3? Yes Paul, was alluding to the annual sacrifices for atonement of the people of Israel.Leviticus 16:34 Under the Mosaic Law, sacrifices were made, on the annual Day of ...


4

The phrase in question is כִּיקַר כָּרִים (kiqar karim). As it stands it means either "like the preciousness of young rams" or "like the preciousness of pastures". (See the standard lexicons such as BDB, HALOT, and the Dictionary of Classical Hebrew for this double meaning of the homonym כַּר, kar). If the former, then it may refer to the fat of male lambs ...


3

The Idea in Brief The apparent reading is that blood cleanses from sin, but that water provides complete cleansing in respect to the removal of death (covenant separation). In the Hebrew Bible, blood atones for sin, but it is water that washes away death. This washing away therefore restores one to covenant relationship to the Lord. In this respect, Jewish ...


3

Restatement of the Question: Why was Abel's sacrifice considered 'greater', 'more', or 'above' Cain's? Was it because they were different types of sacrifice, or was there something else at work? Historically, there is a great amount of speculation regarding this passage, but this answer is constrained to Scripture only : Answer 1: Because Cain was ...


3

Background Info As other answers here show, to even begin to answer this from Scripture, one has to piece together other Scriptures, as the wording of Heb 9:12 is not distinct enough by grammar alone to know whether "διὰ δὲ τοῦ ἰδίου αἵματος" ("but by his own blood") implies in the exact same way as the picture of the OT sacrifices ...


3

Then the king of Moab took his oldest son, who would have been the next king, and sacrificed him as a burnt offering on the wall. So there was great anger against Israel, and the Israelites withdrew and returned to their own land. (2 Kings 3:27, NLT) I'd interpret this as saying that the king sacrificed his son which then fuelled the rage of the Moabites - ...


3

The lamb was to be roasted with fire not eaten raw or boiled. The lamb was to be proportioned between households so that everything would be eaten: …every man shall take a lamb according to their fathers’ house, a lamb for a household. And if the household is too small for a lamb, then he and his nearest neighbor shall take according to the number of ...


3

The next verse makes it clear that we are dealing with a burnt offering. On the sabbath day: two male lambs a year old without blemish, and two-tenths of an ephah of choice flour for a grain offering, mixed with oil, and its drink offering— this is the burnt offering for every sabbath, in addition to the regular burnt offering and its drink offering. (28:...


3

You need to correctly divide and interpret these two symbols of the blood you seem to be mixing together. First, Pesach. The Lamb represents Jesus’s body which he gave to us/you to take your judgement. But, the blood was a sign, a sign of a covenant , that covenant he made. It was a blood covenant, a covenant that would only come into effect after a death. ...


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