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14

Reading this passage today made me want to research it. Jesus is Lord of the Sabbath, and He came to fulfill the law not break it. This passage has several aspects that are best read together as Jesus combines them: Jesus and Disciples Pluck and Eat Grains on the Sabbath At that time Jesus went through the grainfields on the Sabbath. And His disciples ...


9

You appear to be overlooking the obvious reading because you are attaching the plural to the wrong thing in your head. 1 sabbath = 1 period of 7 days ending in a day of rest. 2 sabbaths = 2 periods of 7 days with days of rest on each 7th day. 3 sabbaths = 3 periods of 7 days with days of rest on each 7th day. See the pattern? Most of those plural readings ...


7

Genesis 2:2 וַיְכַל אֱלֹהִים בַּיֹּום הַשְּׁבִיעִי מְלַאכְתֹּו אֲשֶׁר עָשָׂה וַיִּשְׁבֹּת בַּיֹּום הַשְּׁבִיעִי מִכָּל־מְלַאכְתֹּו אֲשֶׁר עָשָֽׂה׃ The word translated as "rest" in English, is actually the conjugated word from which we get the English word Sabbath, which actually means to "cease doing". וַיִּשְׁבֹּת or by its root: שָׁבַת Here's ...


7

It is the commandment to circumcise one’s son on the eighth day of their life.1 3 And on the eighth day, you shall circumcise the flesh of his foreskin. The Jews debated whether it was permitted to perform circumcision on Shabbat. The question: was circumcision considered to be מְלָאכָה (melaʾkha) and therefore prohibited on the Sabbath?2 The rabbis ...


6

Jesus states He is the Lord of the Sabbath. Thayer’s meaning of Lord κύριος: “he to whom a person or thing belongs, about which he has the power of deciding; master, lord; used a. universally, of the possessor and disposer of a thing, the owner.” When Jesus claimed to be the Lord of the Sabbath He was stating that He was owner of the Sabbath; it was His ...


6

The early christians made a tradition out of meeting on "the first day of the week", which is Sunday, because Saturday is the last day of the week (you can compare this to an American calendar which start the week on a Sunday and ends it on a Saturday.) Acts 20:7: On the first day of the week we came together to break bread. Paul spoke to the people ...


5

Unlike what some consider to a blatant mistake, the argument from David and the Showbread works to show the identity of Jesus as the Lord of the Sabbath who is also the Son of God. The original narrative (1 Samuel 21:1-9) includes David, the High Priest Ahimelech, 12 loaves of week old showbread, and Doeg the Edomite. David’s men are discussed but not ...


5

I think that the argument could be stated very simply: Jesus is in effect stating that, "You are trying to lambast us for a perceived infraction (rabbinic law), but one of your heros actually broke the mosaic law without it reducing your opinion of him."


5

Because Jesus was the one who created all things: 1 In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. 2 He was in the beginning with God. 3 All things were made through Him, and without Him nothing was made that was made. [...] 14 And the Word became flesh and dwelt among us, and we beheld His glory, the glory as of the only ...


5

Οἱ οὖν Ἰουδαῖοι, ἐπεὶ παρασκευὴ ἦν, ἵνα μὴ μείνῃ ἐπὶ τοῦ σταυροῦ τὰ σώματα ἐν τῷ σαββάτῳ, ἦν γὰρ μεγάλη ἡ ἡμέρα ἐκείνου τοῦ σαββάτου, ἠρώτησαν τὸν Πειλᾶτον / Πιλᾶτον ἵνα κατεαγῶσιν αὐτῶν τὰ σκέλη καὶ ἀρθῶσιν. The greek text explicitly states that the motivation for breaking the legs was so that bodies could be removed for preparation for the sabbath. There ...


4

The NASB translation, as quoted, is a reasonable translation of Genesis 2:2-3. The verses as they appear in the MT do not present any linguistic problem in terms of composition, word choice or grammar. The claim regarding the v'yivarech (blessing of) and v'yikadesh (sanctification of) the seventh day being more than simple utterances is obviously correct. ...


3

Matthew 28:1 is an obscure use of the preposition ὀψὲ, which means "after" when taking the genitive plural. This is explained in Blass et al., A Greek Grammar of the New Testament and Early Christian Literature (University of Chicago Press, 1961), pp.90-91. It is also discussed in Bauer's Greek-English Lexicon of the New Testament and Other Early Christian ...


3

The Law (Ex. 20:8-11) Remember the sabbath day, to keep it holy. 9 Six days shalt thou labour, and do all thy work: 10 But the seventh day is the sabbath of the LORD thy God: in it thou shalt not do any work, thou, nor thy son, nor thy daughter, thy manservant, nor thy maidservant, nor thy cattle, nor thy stranger that is within thy gates: 11 For ...


3

In regards to your citing of 2 Chronicles 36:21: "To fulfil the word of the Lord by the mouth of Jeremiah, until the land had enjoyed her sabbaths: for as long as she lay desolate she kept sabbath, to fulfil threescore and ten years." The Sabbath for the land was different than the Sabbath for the man. The land had a Sabbath rest every seventh year, in ...


3

You are correct to say that the two verses in Genesis imply that the time from the 17th day of the 2nd month to the 17th day of the 7th month is exactly 5 x 30 = 150 days; that is: each month is exactly 30 days. What you overlook is that in a lunar calendar the time from one sighting of the new moon to the next sighting will be 30 days in about half of the ...


3

Scriptural context must be the primary driver for the answer, particularly because this section starts with "therefore". Paul's admonition to "let no one pass judgment" springs forth from verses 2:1-15. In 2:1-5, he desires to visit them "face-to-face" so that they may have a "...full assurance of understand and the knowledge of God's mystery, which is ...


3

Simply put, humanly speaking, God never really rested. The Sabbath (Hebrew Shabbat or Shabbas) was made for people, and not vice versa, which Jesus made quite clear (see Mark 2:27 NAS). Careful exegesis and hermeneutics require that we become sensitive to expressions which describe human beings and the human condition, but which when applied to God are ...


3

I find your question a little perplexing, though I assume--rightly I hope--that your question has to do with the apparently conflicting descriptions of the events which occurred after Jesus' death and before He resurrected and appeared to His disciples, starting with Mary Magdalene. In attempting to come up with an answer, I consulted Orville E. Daniel's ...


3

1. Scripture - There is a key part of your Luke 22:36, (from Isaiah 53:12) reference where Yeshua says, "...For I tell you this: the passage from the Tanakh that says, ‘He was counted with transgressors,’ has to be fulfilled in me; since what is happening to me has a purpose.” 2. Explanation - In response to, "widely held Christian tradition", this is ...


3

From the MT Hebrew it is clear that God did not create anything ("work"), or even put the finishing touches on anything on the seventh day. The question arises because of the use of "completed" or "finished" to translate ויכולו instead of "had finished" or "ceased". The English words "completed" or "finished" can indicate the action or work that completes ...


3

The command to observe the Sabbath established a system of reckoning time. Unlike months and years which can be counted and tracked by the moon and the sun, the seven-day cycle has no natural or astronomical markers. It can only be observed on the correct day by correctly and continually counting days. There is no Scripture which names days of the week; ...


3

The Rabbis and leaders in Christ's day had made the Sabbath a burden for the people by enjoining upon the people countless rules and regulations which God did not require. For them, it was hard work and exhausting labor to try and serve the Sabbath the way that it was prescribed by those Jewish leaders. Christ, in His message, "the Sabbath was made for man, ...


2

In order to understand the New Testament we must first understand the foundation on which it sits: the Old Testament. The passage that Jesus is making reference to is found in I Samuel 21. It is of most importance to note that Jesus affirmed that it was lawful only for priests to eat the bread. Leviticus 24 details how the bread (or cakes ) were prepared and ...


2

Pleasd read Acts 20:7 or 1 Cor. 16:2 using a Greek interlinear, you will find that in Greek it shows the word Saturday or Sabaton and not 1st day or Sunday. The first Christians kept the Sabbath or the 7th day. The translation is a complete lie or misslesding intent.


2

I believe the other answer is not a good understanding of the historical event in context. One thing we should not do is try to read into the text what we know from tradition. The tradition I am speaking of is Good Friday. We should not try to fit the text into man made traditions because it simply doesn't work and it does not match with the written ...


2

Leviticus 23 contains all the appointed times starting with the most frequent, the weekly Sabbath. Then there are annual days primarily set by the day of the month. The two exceptions are first fruits and weeks. Each of these follow a weekly Sabbath. The first follows the first Sabbath after Passover; the second follows the seventh Sabbath. Many of the ...


2

All four accounts use the same word when describing the day: Now after the Sabbath (σαββάτων), toward the dawn of the first day of the week (σαββάτων)… (Matthew 28:1) And very early on the first day of the week (σαββάτων)… (Mark 16:2) But on the first day of the week (σαββάτων)... (Luke 24:1) Now on the first day of the week (σαββάτων)… (...


2

The "He" Refers to the LORD Grammatically Hebrew functions just like many other language in that pronouns, unless specified by some grammatical gender distinction that would point to a further back referent, typically refer to the nearest antecedent. So the last personal reference was "the LORD" (which is a third person form of reference to Himself as ...


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