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15

Reading this passage today made me want to research it. Jesus is Lord of the Sabbath, and He came to fulfill the law not break it. This passage has several aspects that are best read together as Jesus combines them: Jesus and Disciples Pluck and Eat Grains on the Sabbath At that time Jesus went through the grainfields on the Sabbath. And His disciples ...


12

It says "Don't kindle a fire," not "don't allow a fire to be burning." The prohibition is on the act of lighting a fire, not of having a fire be lit. Having a fire burning to generate heat, or a candle lit to create light, is perfectly permissible- provided that everything is set up before the Sabbath. (Stoking the fire, or adding fuel, ...


8

You appear to be overlooking the obvious reading because you are attaching the plural to the wrong thing in your head. 1 sabbath = 1 period of 7 days ending in a day of rest. 2 sabbaths = 2 periods of 7 days with days of rest on each 7th day. 3 sabbaths = 3 periods of 7 days with days of rest on each 7th day. See the pattern? Most of those plural readings ...


7

Jesus states He is the Lord of the Sabbath. Thayer’s meaning of Lord κύριος: “he to whom a person or thing belongs, about which he has the power of deciding; master, lord; used a. universally, of the possessor and disposer of a thing, the owner.” When Jesus claimed to be the Lord of the Sabbath He was stating that He was owner of the Sabbath; it was His ...


7

Genesis 2:2 וַיְכַל אֱלֹהִים בַּיֹּום הַשְּׁבִיעִי מְלַאכְתֹּו אֲשֶׁר עָשָׂה וַיִּשְׁבֹּת בַּיֹּום הַשְּׁבִיעִי מִכָּל־מְלַאכְתֹּו אֲשֶׁר עָשָֽׂה׃ The word translated as "rest" in English, is actually the conjugated word from which we get the English word Sabbath, which actually means to "cease doing". וַיִּשְׁבֹּת or by its root: שָׁבַת Here's ...


7

Unlike what some consider to a blatant mistake, the argument from David and the Showbread works to show the identity of Jesus as the Lord of the Sabbath who is also the Son of God. The original narrative (1 Samuel 21:1-9) includes David, the High Priest Ahimelech, 12 loaves of week old showbread, and Doeg the Edomite. David’s men are discussed but not ...


7

It is the commandment to circumcise one’s son on the eighth day of their life.1 3 And on the eighth day, you shall circumcise the flesh of his foreskin. The Jews debated whether it was permitted to perform circumcision on Shabbat. The question: was circumcision considered to be מְלָאכָה (melaʾkha) and therefore prohibited on the Sabbath?2 The rabbis ...


7

At the time of Exodus 16:27, there was no prescription of punishment for violating the Sabbath except sin offerings. That changed in Exodus 35 1 Moses assembled the whole Israelite community and said to them, “These are the things the Lord has commanded you to do: 2For six days, work is to be done, but the seventh day shall be your holy day, a day of ...


5

I think that the argument could be stated very simply: Jesus is in effect stating that, "You are trying to lambast us for a perceived infraction (rabbinic law), but one of your heros actually broke the mosaic law without it reducing your opinion of him."


5

The context of the scriptures is very key. Matt. chap. 24 & 25 is a discussion centered around the destruction of the temple in Jerusalem. "And having gone forth, Jesus departed from the temple, and his disciples came near to show him the buildings of the temple, 2 and Jesus said to them, `Do ye not see all these? verily I say to you, There may ...


5

When we interpret such things, first of all, a precise philosophical-theological principle should be established, otherwise we are doomed to commit an error. Here we should establish as the principle the great philosophical-theological insight which Jesus gave to His disciples of all epochs and generations: "Sabbath is for man, not man for Sabbath" ...


4

I believe the other answer is not a good understanding of the historical event in context. One thing we should not do is try to read into the text what we know from tradition. The tradition I am speaking of is Good Friday. We should not try to fit the text into man made traditions because it simply doesn't work and it does not match with the written ...


4

I find your question a little perplexing, though I assume--rightly I hope--that your question has to do with the apparently conflicting descriptions of the events which occurred after Jesus' death and before He resurrected and appeared to His disciples, starting with Mary Magdalene. In attempting to come up with an answer, I consulted Orville E. Daniel's ...


4

Matthew 28:1 is an obscure use of the preposition ὀψὲ, which means "after" when taking the genitive plural. This is explained in Blass et al., A Greek Grammar of the New Testament and Early Christian Literature (University of Chicago Press, 1961), pp.90-91. It is also discussed in Bauer's Greek-English Lexicon of the New Testament and Other Early Christian ...


4

Οἱ οὖν Ἰουδαῖοι, ἐπεὶ παρασκευὴ ἦν, ἵνα μὴ μείνῃ ἐπὶ τοῦ σταυροῦ τὰ σώματα ἐν τῷ σαββάτῳ, ἦν γὰρ μεγάλη ἡ ἡμέρα ἐκείνου τοῦ σαββάτου, ἠρώτησαν τὸν Πειλᾶτον / Πιλᾶτον ἵνα κατεαγῶσιν αὐτῶν τὰ σκέλη καὶ ἀρθῶσιν. The greek text explicitly states that the motivation for breaking the legs was so that bodies could be removed for preparation for the sabbath. There ...


4

The NASB translation, as quoted, is a reasonable translation of Genesis 2:2-3. The verses as they appear in the MT do not present any linguistic problem in terms of composition, word choice or grammar. The claim regarding the v'yivarech (blessing of) and v'yikadesh (sanctification of) the seventh day being more than simple utterances is obviously correct. ...


4

The argument is about the difference between will and subsequent action. The Numbers' (15:33) Israelite man had the will to gathering wood, as well as performed the action to gather wood. The Israelite individuals mentioned in Exo 16:27 had only the will, since the circumstances did not allow them to perform the action of gathering manna. So, since the ...


4

If nothing was found on the sabbath, then no work was done in carrying it back to the tents. Therefore, the sabbath was not violated (in any way which could be proved). All that happened was that some people went for a walk on the sabbath. And, having found nothing, they may not have admitted what it was they were actually doing. In which case, again, no ...


4

I do not believe Jesus is implying that He expects His disciples to be Sabbath keepers and certainly not from Matthew 24:20. Let me set the table with some context. At Matthew 24:3 the disciples ask Jesus a very important question? "And as He was sitting on the Mount of Olives, the disciples came to Him privately, saying, "Tell us when will these ...


4

This Hebrew passage talks of the day of rest. In the days of Joshua, he bought the Israelites a certain kind of rest but it wasn't a permanent one. A long time later God spoke through David in Psalm 95 7for he is our God and we are the people of his pasture, the flock under his care. Today, if only you would hear his voice, 8“Do not harden your hearts as ...


4

In terms of other nations observing a sabbath, this is divided into two questions Which nation observed a seven day week. Once you have the week, you will mark the seventh day as a special day with prescriptions and prohibitons on that day. Indeed, that's what it means to observe a week. Of those required observances, how similar were they to the Mosaic ...


4

This is part of the discourse on impending destruction. Some read this chapter as a reference strictly to the events of the Roman-Jewish war of 66-73; others read it as a prophetic statement referring to two future events--the Roman-Jewish war and a subsequent second coming of Christ. (For a discussion of the prevalence of dual fulfillment prophecies in ...


4

It is true that in the Hebrew, "Sabbath" almost always refers to the weekly Sabbath with only very few exceptions such as Lev 16:31, 32 where it refers to the Day of Atonement. However, in NT Koine Greek, Sabbath only ever refers to the weekly Sabbath or a period of 1 week. See BDAG. This remains true in non-Biblical Koine Greek was well. Put ...


3

In regards to your citing of 2 Chronicles 36:21: "To fulfil the word of the Lord by the mouth of Jeremiah, until the land had enjoyed her sabbaths: for as long as she lay desolate she kept sabbath, to fulfil threescore and ten years." The Sabbath for the land was different than the Sabbath for the man. The land had a Sabbath rest every seventh year, in ...


3

Leviticus 23 contains all the appointed times starting with the most frequent, the weekly Sabbath. Then there are annual days primarily set by the day of the month. The two exceptions are first fruits and weeks. Each of these follow a weekly Sabbath. The first follows the first Sabbath after Passover; the second follows the seventh Sabbath. Many of the ...


3

The Law (Ex. 20:8-11) Remember the sabbath day, to keep it holy. 9 Six days shalt thou labour, and do all thy work: 10 But the seventh day is the sabbath of the LORD thy God: in it thou shalt not do any work, thou, nor thy son, nor thy daughter, thy manservant, nor thy maidservant, nor thy cattle, nor thy stranger that is within thy gates: 11 For ...


3

John 11:53 / 12:1 suggest that the Pharisees began plotting to kill Jesus around a week before the Passover (depending on the degree of a time gap you suspect between the verses), and 11:57 suggests they were waiting until somebody told them where he was: Jn 11:53 "So from that day on they made plans to put him to death." Jn 11:57 "Now the ...


3

You are correct to say that the two verses in Genesis imply that the time from the 17th day of the 2nd month to the 17th day of the 7th month is exactly 5 x 30 = 150 days; that is: each month is exactly 30 days. What you overlook is that in a lunar calendar the time from one sighting of the new moon to the next sighting will be 30 days in about half of the ...


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