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To answer your main question, there are none righteous in Luke 5:31. Christ is speaking ironically here. Even though His metaphor about the healthy people not needing a doctor (symbolic for sinners needing a savior) is true, there are no people who fit into that category. I don’t believe Christ is purposefully being sarcastic or sardonic here since this ...


7

Seek first...then... But seek first the kingdom of God and his righteousness, and all these things will be added to you. (Matthew 6:33) [ESV] The Kingdom of God is certainly a Kingdom in which God reigns supreme; as Creator, all creation is part of His Kingdom and one would expect His will to be done throughout. However, it is clear this ideal, or ...


6

The following commentary from the Jewish Publication Society provides one suggested response to this very difficult question. Fox, Michael V. (2004). Ecclesiastes. Philadelphia: Jewish Publication Society, 52-53.


5

The sudden shame for Adam's (and Eve)nakedness is an allegory, the physical of the spiritual. Not just the gained knowledge from eating the fruit. First, they were commanded not to eat the fruit from the tree, nor touch it (Genesis 3:3) This is confirmed when the Lord went searching for Adam in Genesis 3:11 "And He said, "Who told you that you were naked? ...


5

My dad, who is a pastor, has an interesting theory as of why. He says that prior to the Fall, they were clothed in light as a result of walking with God. They were physically naked, but because they were clothed in God's glory, they couldn't see that they were naked. This idea is rooted in Exodus 34:9-25, where Moses' face was radiant from being in God's ...


5

Nobody! Because “every man is liar, only God is true” (Romans 3:4), or as Søren Kierkegaard writes, “in relation to God we are always in the wrong”, therefore all men without any exception needs the Redeemer, the heavenly Physician - Lord Jesus Christ. Thus, the Lord applies irony here: “you Pharisees are healthy, need not Me, can do salvation and self-...


4

What the text says, and the author is quite clear to point this out by referring to himself in the third person (the only occasion, apart from 1:1, that he does this) and then saying 'I (have not) found', is that he has yet to meet a woman who he considers to be upright. In his wisdom, he would never assume from this that 'there are no upright women' - he is ...


4

Fantastic question! Although I don't have time to craft a thorough answer, I'd like to offer some observations. (Note: I am narrowing my discussion to the two principal alternatives you suggested: possessive or subjective genitive -- i.e., God's righteousness, or believers'.) First, I would suggest that Paul's own commentary on this particular phrase is ...


4

1. Question Restatement: In Genesis, why did Adam and Eve become ashamed when they realized they were naked after eating from the Tree of the Knowledge of Good and Evil? 2. Possible Answer - It is shameful for the one who knows good, but does not do it: The Tree of Knowledge was Knowledge of BOTH Righteousness AND Evil: NKJV, James 4:17 - Therefore, to ...


4

There is nothing in the Genesis account to indicate that this was an allegory.To do so it would mean to undermine the Word of God. Your perceptive question is addressed by almost all the biblical commentaries… On the second verse you quote, "Then the eyes of both of them were opened and they realized that they were naked," Even a blind person knows when he ...


4

The Scribes and Pharisees had been hypocrites: Matthew 23:1-4 (DRB) Then Jesus spoke to the multitudes and to his disciples, 2 Saying: The scribes and the Pharisees have sitten on the chair of Moses. 3 All things therefore whatsoever they shall say to you, observe and do: but according to their works do ye not; for they say, and do not. For they bind heavy ...


4

Since all men die, the "death" and "deliverance" that Ezekiel is discussing must refer to the man's eternal salvation. This passage in Eze 33 is one of many passages in the Scripture that show how one's eternal salvation can be rejected. Here is a sample: King Saul who was a statesman and prophet called by God (1 Sam 10:11, 12, 19:24), ...


4

Liddell & Scott reference the Greek word makran in order to explain molis, the idea of being 'a great way off'. Thayer translates molis as 'with difficulty' or 'not readily'. Luke uses the word in connection with a nautical difficulty related to wind conditions when sailing under Crete, they hardly (molis) passed it. But there is nothing in Paul's words ...


3

Good question. First I would suggest not going by a fringe, unorthodox source like Jesuswordsonly.com. Secondly, I claim no Hebrew expertise, but point out that the normal understanding of this verse — that God counted Abram's faith as righteousness — has been agreed upon by both Jews and Christians for eons. This is evidenced by the Septuagint — the 2nd-...


3

Three things in this verse need to be identified (1) What is this ‘death’ – literal or spiritual? (2) What ‘Spirit’ is being spoken of? (3) What is this ‘righteousness’? Only then should it become clear what ‘because of’ means. (1) The verse says ‘…the body is dead because of sin’ yet this cannot be literal death as chapter 8 addresses living Christians who ...


3

It just so happens that relates to the subject of my PhD dissertation that I am currently working on, so the subject is of great personal interest to me. In an answer here there is no way to answer these questions fully in this context Since the arrival of the New Perspective on Paul in the late 70s this has been a hotly debated subject for a couple of ...


3

The answer is in Luke 15 the righteous are those that has no need of repentance. In the same way, I tell you that there will be more joy in heaven over one sinner who repents than over ninety-nine righteous ones who do not need to repent. (Luke 15:7)


3

The answer to this is actually in the previous few verses of Ps 85:10-13 (the translations vary somewhat)- 10 Loving devotion and faithfulness have joined together; righteousness and peace have kissed. 11 Faithfulness sprouts from the earth, and righteousness looks down from heaven. 12 The LORD will indeed provide what is good, and our land will yield its ...


2

If you want to investigate the righteousness of God the best reference I've found is Iustitia Dei by Alister McGrath which is available online. It is a very long document - over 400 pages - but if you just take the first 30 you will start to understand the issue. He starts with the Old Testatment (which after all was the basis of Paul's world view even if ...


2

Knowledge of good & evil (kge) made them feel guilty of being naked. That is why God forbid them from choosing kge. They were naked (which was sinful before the law or kge) & yet accepted by God for the sake of His Son Jesus. But they rejected Jesus and chose the law. Now we are given an opportunity to reject law & accept Jesus (Romans 7:4 , ...


2

Possible lessons from the account of Adam and Eve's nakedness: the story provides the origin of conscience, which Paul describes as "a law written upon men's hearts". This presages the role of the Torah which, rather than producing righteousness, produces Self-consciousness and shame. The point wasn't that they were naked but that they had become aware of ...


2

I would translate the Hebrew of Genesis 3:7 like this: Then the eyes of both of them were opened. And when they perceived their own nakedness, then they sewed fig leaves and made coverings for themselves. Details: "Sight/eyes" comes from the Hebrew word עַיִן (Strong's H5869 - `ayin). It is clearly not a reference to the physical eyes of Adam and Eve, ...


2

Yes, Paul is saying here that submitting to obedience brings righteousness in exactly the same way that obeying sin brings death. In this chapter Paul does compare and contrast the old man with the new man, and that is exactly the relationship he is presenting here. He is reminding us that no matter what we say about our salvation, our actions do have some ...


2

Peace. Adam and Eve BECAME (hayah) naked….that is, they became without works of righteousness (God’s righteousness) to clothe themselves with. They were put in the garden to work and keep it....that is, to work and keep His commandments which are a delight (the meaning of "Eden") as they are not burdensome. This working and the keeping of His ...


2

Most commentators have that the nations (gentiles) are the ones discussed in the last half of Romans c.1 because of verse 20. "20 For the invisible things of him from the creation of the world are clearly seen, being understood by the things that are made, even his eternal power and Godhead; so that they are without excuse:" (KJV) All men have the ...


2

One of the keys to understanding Romans 6-8 is Paul's personification of sin. I like to make that clearer to the reader by rendering "sin" as "Mr. Sin": Rom 7:13  Was then that which is good made death unto me? God forbid. But [Mr.] sin, that it might appear sin, working death in me by that which is good; that [Mr.] sin by the commandment might become ...


2

Here is how I see the Greek of this verse: The one knowing no sin He made to be sin for our sakes, that we ourselves might become God's righteousness in him. Details: Further explanation Paul makes reference in this verse to the righteousness of both Jesus and God. Regarding Jesus' righteousness: Paul recognises and declares Jesus' righteousness when ...


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