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7

The Psalms can be divided into 5 books marked by benedictions. For instance, Book 1 and Book 2 are separated by a verse that is usually included as a conclusion to Psalm 41: Blessed is the LORD, God of Israel, from eternity to eternity. Amen and Amen. So Psalm 14 is in the first and Psalm 53 is in the second book of Psalms. Psalm 40:14-18 (or 13-17 in most ...


7

I do not believe that the Psalmist's poetry is based on a custom but on a figure of speech; namely, God feels and understands our sorry and our tears are not "wasted" because it is as if God keeps them in a bottle. This is confirmed by the parallel idea in the next clause, "are they not in thy book?" - ie, have you (God) not kept an ...


6

Isiah 51:9 & Psalm 89:10 is a symbolical expression for Egypt. Awake, awake, put on strength, O arm of the LORD; awake, as in the ancient days, in the generations of old. Art thou not it that hath cut Rahab (H7294 - rahaḇ), and wounded the dragon? (Isaiah 51:9 KJV) Thou hast broken Rahab in pieces (H7294 - rahaḇ), as one that is slain; thou hast ...


5

When God slew 'their' chosen it was the chosen of Israel that he slew. When God slew 'them' he slew the chosen and stout ones. Those who repented were of Israel, the body of persons called 'Israel'. Those who were slain did not have any further opportunity to repent. But those who were left, did have opportunity, and did so. The same is seen in the visions ...


5

The Hebrew word גִּתִּית (gittith) occurs only three times in the OT and always in the title of a psalm, namely Ps 8, 81, 84. Its meaning is uncertain but it appears to be either: a musical term of some kind (eg a tune or method of performance?), or, - The name of an instrument The latter possibility appears far more probable. If this is true, then, the ...


5

It's always difficult to know which of two sources came first when the only evidence is the differences between them. But here is an argument for Psalm 53 coming first, at least in the sense of likely preserving an earlier sense that was lost from Psalm 14. We don't really know whether differences stem from manuscript traditions or from different varieties ...


5

Here's how it works. "Eyes" (עיניים) in Hebrew is a "dual" or "pair" word (צורה זוגי)1 like "ears" (אוזניים) and other parts of the body that generally come in pairs. These dual words are usually feminine gender. Exception to pairs objects are "teeth" (שיניים) and finger or toe nails (ציפורניים) that have a ...


5

Jesus did quote the beginning of Psalm 22 on the cross (Matt. 27:46; Mark 15:34; Luke 24:44) אֵלִ֣י אֵ֭לִי לָמָ֣ה עֲזַבְתָּ֑נִי (Psalm 22:2a, MT)  And about the ninth hour Jesus cried out with a loud voice, saying, “Eli, Eli, lema sabachthani?” that is, “My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?” (Matt. 27:46, ESV) περὶ δὲ τὴν ἐνάτην ὥραν ⸀ἀνεβόησεν ὁ ...


5

In verse 20 there's no doubt David references angels. The word used is מַלְאָךְ / mal'āḵ. Even though the word is sometimes applied to human beings (Mal. 2:7, Rev. 1:20), it's indeed more commonly applied to spiritual beings. Yet that's not the case in verse 21. Even though some translations use "angels" in verse 21 (NLT, NASB), most of the other ...


4

Pupil | אִישׁ֣וֹן Ishon is the "apple" of your eye. - Eyelids "guard" the pupil. Psalms | Tehillim 17:8 "Guard me like-[the] pupil of Your-Eye" שָׁ֭מְרֵנִי כְּאִישׁ֣וֹן בַּת־עָ֑יִן Radak on Psalm 17:8 Keep me as the pupil (אישׁון) of the ball of the eye: – as a man guards the pupil of his eye – that is, the black part through ...


4

What is the apple of God's eye? The 'apple of God's eye' is the pupil as defined by the original Hebrew word (see Biblehub's #380 ishon). What is the writer depicting? Think about this: if you get an eyelash or speck of dust between your eye and eyelid, you would feel it immediately and the irritation would urge you to remove the foreign particle with haste. ...


4

Did David pray to angels in Psalms 103:20-21? Psalm 103:20-21 (NASB) 20 Bless the Lord, you His angels, Mighty in strength, who perform His word, Obeying the voice of His word! 1 Bless the Lord, all you His [a]angels, You who serve Him, doing His will. Psalm 103:20-21 (ASV) 20 Bless Jehovah, ye his angels, That are mighty in strength, that fulfill his ...


4

David does the same thing in his prayer of Ps 32 and Ps 51. The sacrifices were only ever a symbol, a reminder, to seek pardon from God. Ps 51:16, 17 - For You do not delight in sacrifice, or I would bring it; You take no pleasure in burnt offerings. The sacrifices of God are a broken spirit; a broken and a contrite heart, O God, You will not despise. 1 ...


4

The key meaning here is advice. The idea is the people (giving counsel) helping you make plans by giving you advice. Think of a counselor in school. This varies depending on the person. It could be a financial advisor. For a President it's his cabinet. Some professional athletes had financial advisors that left them broke. At the very lease you want ...


4

Christians too may feel righteous anger, but Paul says do not sin. Christians do not allow anger to lead to uncontrolled outbursts, abusive speech, or violence. (Eph 4:31) Ps 4:4 advises God’s servants to express their concerns about the cause of their anger in private prayer to God. do not let the sunset while you are still angry: To the Jews, sunset marked ...


4

Literal Standard Version Galatians 2:21b for if righteousness [is] through law—then Christ died in vain. There is no verb in the original Greek if-clause. NIV: for if righteousness could be gained through the law, Christ died for nothing!” The law does refer to the Torah. It's just that no one can keep the whole Torah perfectly. Ellicott explains: If ...


4

Let's look at another psalm, Psalm 110: Of David. A psalm. 1The Lord says to my lord: “Sit at my right hand until I make your enemies a footstool for your feet.” The title claims that this is a psalm of David. Jesus confirms it in Luke 20: 42 David himself declares in the Book of Psalms: “’The Lord said to my Lord: “Sit at my right hand For this psalm, ...


3

Verses 25 and 26 provide the answer you seek: Whom have I in heaven but you? And earth has nothing I desire besides you. My flesh and my heart may fail, but God is the strength of my heart and my portion for ever. The preceding verses help to put this Psalm into context. The arrogant and the wicked, who appear to be healthy and strong and who seem to ...


3

In Psalm 19 [verses 2-6], we read a romantic wedding analogy describing the relationship between God's sun and the earth. -- Similar to the wedding ceremony described in [Joel 2:16]. "The-Sky" ( הָ-רָקִֽיעַ ) is used as a wedding canopy / chupah (חוּפָּה) "Tent" ( אֹ֥הֶל ) to welcome the "Sun" ( שֶּׁ֗מֶשׁ ), "like a Groom&...


3

The Bible often used the word אֱלהִים (elhohim = literally "gods") in the sense of human judges. Here is a sample: Ex 21:6 - then his master is to bring him before the judges [אֱלהִים]. And he shall take him to the door or doorpost and pierce his ear with an awl. Then he shall serve his master for life. Ex 22:8 - If the thief is not found, the ...


3

I don't think so. Psalms 144 is a psalm of David, for rescue and prosperity. To fulfill means to bring to an end Are you asking if David was rescued then in Mark 4:36-39? That's not making much sense to me. Also, in Psalms 144:11 Rescue me and save me from the hand of foreigners, (...) the image of the foreigns as floodwaters isn't present anymore. So ...


3

Note the consistent pattern in the Bible: 2 Sam 12:9 - Why then have you despised the command of the LORD by doing evil in His sight? You put Uriah the Hittite to the sword and took his wife as your own, for you have slain him with the sword of the Ammonites. [David is held responsible for killing Uriah the Hittite because he issued the order that resulted ...


3

There is doubt as to the most accurate translation. I read this as the plural "gods", with the understanding that what is most likely meant by "gods" is "heavenly bodies", such as stars, comets due to the overall structure of the psalm, as per NICOT The second stanza closes with four balanced cola that specify the subjects over ...


3

Bible Hub is not giving the full information, which is like this. Eyes in your eyes עֵ֝ינֶ֗יךָ is neither singular or plural. It is dual construct with the second person singular suffix. You are singular and you have two eyes. The construct form in both dual and plural drop the ם. Dual Nouns 4.21 The dual is used to refer to two things, not one or ...


3

Jews were familiar with the Old Testament in much the same way as Christians are familiar with Paul, and stories from the Gospel - if you knew the first part, you knew how the rest of the story went. As such, when someone quotes Scripture in the New Testament, they quote minimal portions, and expect the reader to remember the whole story, and thus the place ...


3

This question is part of a far more general pattern between the OT and NT that takes the titles and unique attributes of Jehovah in the OT and applies them to Jesus in the NT. Unique Attribute OT Jehovah NT Jesus God Deut 4:35, 6:4, 32:39, Isa 44:6, 45:5, 6 Matt 1:22, 23; John 1:1, 18, 20:28, Col 2:9, Rom 9:5, Heb 1:8, 9, Tit 2:13, 2 Peter 1:1, 1 Tim 3:16, ...


3

I'd interpret the psalm Messianically. Psalm 45 For the director of music. To the tune of “Lilies.” Of the Sons of Korah. A maskil. A wedding song. 1 My heart is stirred by a noble theme as I recite my verses for the king; The psalm is a Jewish royal wedding song. 2 You are the most excellent of men and your lips have been anointed with grace, since God ...


3

This is a thorn in the side of those who hold some minority views of Deity. The OP raises several matters that must be dealt with separately. Psalm 2:12 In understanding Heb 1:6, Ps 2:12 is not germane because it is NOT quoted. Instead, Heb 1:6 is alluding to Deut 32:43 - (especially the LXX). Rejoice, O heavens, with Him, and let all God’s angels worship ...


3

Τῷ λόγῳ is masculine singular dative. In Koine, there is such a thing as instrumental Dative. In Classical Greek, the dative case is used as the instrumental case. This can be seen in the sentence "..με κτείνει δόλῳ," or "..me ktenei dolôi" (Book IX, line 407 of the Odyssey), which means "he kills me with a bait". Here, "...


3

The first thing to observe is that the OP is confusing two different nouns - names for different things that in Hebrew are different words: In Ps 89:10, Isa 51:9 has, רַהַב (Rahab) = storm, sea monster, or emblematic name of Egypt (BDB), eg, Job 9:13, 26:12, Ps 87:4, 89:10, Isa 30:7, etc. In Josh 6:23 has רָחָב (Rachab), the harlot of Jericho, eg, Josh 2:1, ...


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