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Let's look at another psalm, Psalm 110: Of David. A psalm. 1The Lord says to my lord: “Sit at my right hand until I make your enemies a footstool for your feet.” The title claims that this is a psalm of David. Jesus confirms it in Luke 20: 42 David himself declares in the Book of Psalms: “’The Lord said to my Lord: “Sit at my right hand For this psalm, ...


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In the context of the Scriptures, the word “inspiration” simply means “God-breathed.” Inspiration means the Bible truly is the Word of God and makes the Bible unique among all other books. All Scripture is God-breathed and is useful for teaching, rebuking, correcting and training in righteousness, so that the man of God may be thoroughly equipped for every ...


2

The Hebrew reads, הַפְקֵ֣ד עָלָ֣יו רָשָׁ֑ע וְ֝שָׂטָ֗ן יַעֲמֹ֥ד עַל־יְמִינֽוֹ׃ If King David had intended to mean a specific wicked man he would have written הָרָשָׁ֑ע and by analogy, if he had meant a specific accuser, he would have written וְ֝הַשָׂטָ֗ן putting the letter ה before the word. Therefore The New International Version is to be preferred.


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It is up to translator preference, as there is no capitalization or separate treatment of proper names in Hebrew and Satan just means "accuser". I also fail to see how the meaning would be different in either translation. Those preferring Satan see an allusion to Christ as per Zechariah 3.1: Then he showed me Joshua [Yeshua] the high priest ...


2

The verse 1 title you mention is part of the Hebrew text and part of the original Book of Psalms. לַמְנַצֵּ֣חַ אַל־תַּשְׁחֵת֮ לְדָוִ֪ד מִ֫כְתָּ֥ם בִּשְׁלֹ֥חַ שָׁא֑וּל וַֽיִּשְׁמְר֥וּ ‬ אֶת־הַ֝בַּ֗יִת לַהֲמִיתֹֽו׃ הַצִּילֵ֖נִי מֵאֹיְבַ֥י׀ אֱלֹהָ֑י מִּמִתְקֹומְמַ֥י תְּשַׂגְּבֵֽנִי׃ (Psalm 59:1–2, MT) However, some translations will add there own title, not ...


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New King James Version Psalm 60: 8 Moab is My washpot; Over Edom I will cast My shoe; Philistia, shout in triumph because of Me.” Can anyone shed light on the cultural context of casting a shoe? Ellicott might be helpful: Of the "shoe," as a figure of what is vilest and most common, Dr. J. G. Wetzstein quotes many Arabic proverbs. A covering for ...


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There is some debate as to what is meant. Here is the Word Biblical Commentary[1] translation and notes: Moab is my washpot; I will throw my shoe over Edom— Philistia, shout because of me!” Moab is my washpot The metaphor is one of humiliation and servitude. Washpots were often dirty, used for bathing, and even for toilet purposes. The ...


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what does it mean to cast a shoe? I will make Edom my servant. Psalm 60:8 NET Moab is my washbasin.[a] I will make Edom serve me.[b] I will shout in triumph over Philistia.”[c] Psalm 60:8 NASB 8 Moab is My washbowl; I will throw My sandal over Edom; Shout loud, Philistia, because of Me!” Footnotes NET Bible b/ Psalm 60:8 tn Heb “over Edom I will throw ...


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Note the comments of Ellicott about Ps 139:15 - In the lowest parts of the earth.—This figurative allusion to the womb is intended no doubt to heighten the feeling of mystery attaching to birth. There may also be a covert allusion to the creation from dust as Ecclesiasticus 40:1, “From the day that they go out of their mother’s womb, till the day that they ...


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This question is contentious precisely because there is no hard and fast grammatical rule to distinguish "accuser" (a general noun) from "Satan" (a proper name). Let us examine the data: שָׂטָן (satan) The Hebrew word שָׂטָן definitely means "adversary", or, "accuser" and occurs 27 times in the OT. [Note: it occurs 36 ...


1

English Bibles are not changing a plural into a singular, they are translating. Translation requires expressing the same idea in different languages with different conventions for using singular and plural. That means in one language it may be singular and in another it may be plural. To get this right requires a deep understanding of both languages. For ...


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aefrs is correct. The Hebrew uses dor, whose gloss is "generation, time period, age" in the first instance, and olam, whose gloss is "everlasting, eternity" in the second instance. It is unfortunate that the YLT translation uses two words from the gloss of dor here. I prefer the LEB: A prayer of Moses, the man of God. O Lord, you have ...


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Job 29:2 English Standard Version “Oh, that I were as in the months of old [H6924], as in the days when God watched over me, Psalm 74:12 English Standard Version Yet God my King is from of old [H6924], working salvation in the midst of the earth. Why would translators use the phrase "is from of old"? ESV did it to be consistent with the usage ...


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