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19 votes
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Is there a reason Psalm 136 has exactly 26 repetitions of "For His mercy endures forever"?

In Hebrew Gematria, the number 26 = YHVH ( יְהֹוָ֣ה). The sum of the Name "YHVH" ( יְהֹוָ֣ה) = "Yod"(10) + "Hei"(5) + "Vav"(6) + "Hei"(5).
חִידָה's user avatar
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18 votes
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(Psalm 139:18) Feminine God?

עִמָּֽךְ contains the pausal form of the 2nd person, masculine gender, singular number (2ms) pronominal suffix. This form is identical to the 2nd person, feminine gender, singular number (2fs) ...
Der Übermensch's user avatar
11 votes
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Psalm 29:9 > Do the deer give birth or do the large trees bend?

Is the first image of Psalm 29:9 one pertaining to flora (e.g. NET's "trees"), or fauna (e.g., ESV's "deer")? Good question! The Septuagint took the key word as "deer" (ἔλαφος) here, and the KJV, and ...
Dɑvïd's user avatar
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11 votes

Is the Law eternal?

Psalms 119:160 does have the following definition: judgments מִשְׁפַּ֥ט (miš·paṭ) Noun - masculine singular construct Strong's 4941: A verdict, a sentence, formal decree, divine law, penalty, justice,...
Cork88's user avatar
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11 votes
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How can God draw near to us (James 4:8) if He is already wherever we are (Psalm 139:7-12)?

Psalm 139:7-12 means that there is nowhere one can go to escape God's presence. This represents distance. While it may seem paradoxical, they are not speaking of the same type of nearness. Drawing ...
Jason_'s user avatar
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10 votes

Why did Jesus say, "Eli, Eli, lama sabachthani?" that is to say, My God, my God, why hast thou forsaken me?

Jesus is directly quoting the first line of Psalm 22: My God, my God, why have you forsaken me? Why are you so far from saving me, from the words of my groaning? Psalm 22: ESV The Psalm describes ...
DonJewett's user avatar
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10 votes

Why is Psalm 22:16 not quoted in the New Testament?

Jesus did quote the beginning of Psalm 22 on the cross (Matt. 27:46; Mark 15:34; Luke 24:44) אֵלִ֣י אֵ֭לִי לָמָ֣ה עֲזַבְתָּ֑נִי (Psalm 22:2a, MT)  And about the ninth hour Jesus cried out with a ...
Perry Webb's user avatar
9 votes
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How does the Douay Rheims Bible translate שַׁדַּי as God of Jacob in Psalms 91:1?

The Douay-Rheims version is a translation of the Vulgate. The Vulgate to Psalms seems to have gone through multiple revisions. I looked through all the versions I could find easily and found these ...
b a's user avatar
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8 votes
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In Psalm 82:1 who are in the "congregation" and who are the "gods"?

Background In their commentary Adele Berlin and Marc Zvi Brettler have this to say about Psalm 82: A vision of a heavenly court where God condemns those who judge unfairly. The psalm plays on the ...
Revelation Lad's user avatar
8 votes

Is there a reason Psalm 136 has exactly 26 repetitions of "For His mercy endures forever"?

This will not answer the question but may provide some further information. If we temporarily ignore the last half of each verse "His love endures forever") and examine the first half of ...
Dottard's user avatar
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8 votes

Psalm 14 or Psalm 53 - Which came first?

The Psalms can be divided into 5 books marked by benedictions. For instance, Book 1 and Book 2 are separated by a verse that is usually included as a conclusion to Psalm 41: Blessed is the LORD, God ...
Jon Ericson's user avatar
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8 votes

Is the Law eternal?

The MT for Psalm 119:160 is: רֹאשׁ-דְּבָרְךָ֥ אֱמֶ֑ת וּ֝לְעוֹלָ֗ם כָּל-מִשְׁפַּ֥ט צִדְקֶֽךָ short, pithy, poetic and figurative, a stand-alone verse without context. This verse is open season for a ...
Abu Munir Ibn Ibrahim al Yahud's user avatar
7 votes

Why did Jesus say, "Eli, Eli, lama sabachthani?" that is to say, My God, my God, why hast thou forsaken me?

The key to understanding Matt 27:46 is found in Ps 5:4 - For You are not a God who delights in wickedness; no evil can dwell with You. At the moment Jesus cried out, " ... why have you forsaken ...
Dottard's user avatar
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7 votes
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Is John 8:58 an allusion to Psalm 90:2 LXX?

It certainly apears that John 8:58 is an allusion to Psa. 90:2 since both share the same syntax.1 Both Meyer2 and De Wette3 refer to Psa. 90:2 in their commentary on John 8:58. On his notes of Psa. 90:...
Der Übermensch's user avatar
7 votes

"If I make my bed in hell" from Psalm 139:8

The word "hell" in this text is from the Hebrew word "sheol" (שְׁאוֹל), and can mean grave, pit, or tomb. To make one's bed there, obviously, would be a euphemism for death or ...
Polyhat's user avatar
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7 votes

What is the grammatical basis for understanding אלי in Psalm 2:7 differently than Psalm 22:1?

It's like "Wind the clock" and "The wind blows" in English, where the appropriate word is automatically understood from the context, despite having the same spelling. In Hebrew, &...
Ray Butterworth's user avatar
7 votes
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What is the difference (in the Hebrew) between 'sin' and 'sins' in Psalm 51:2 and Psalm 51:9?

The two words in question are: חַטָּאָה (khatta'ah) = "sin", feminine in Ps 51:2, & 3 [derived from the verb חָטָא (khata) "to miss, go wrong, sin"] חֵטְא (khet) = "sin&...
Dottard's user avatar
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6 votes
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Is Romans 3:10 a quote from the Septuagint?

For Psalms 14 & 53 as a whole, mostly "yes" A few opening thoughts: Yes, it does seem like he is using or borrowing from the Septuagint in particular. Yes, it seems to be a kind of quote/...
Jesse's user avatar
  • 2,054
6 votes

What happened to Psalm 14 verses 5–7?

These verses are only found in a very few late copies of the Septuagint. They’re neither in the Hebrew Masoretic text of the Psalms, nor in the majority text of the Septuagint. For instance, the New ...
Daphne Preston-Kendal's user avatar
6 votes
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Hebrews 1:10 and Psalms 102:25 (101:26)

[Note for anyone who might be suspicious: This is NOT a "sweetheart" question agreed between Der Übermensch and myself. We have had no other correspondence whatsoever, and we do not ...
Dottard's user avatar
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6 votes

How does Psalms 89:10 say Rahab was crushed?

Isiah 51:9 & Psalm 89:10 is a symbolical expression for Egypt. Awake, awake, put on strength, O arm of the LORD; awake, as in the ancient days, in the generations of old. Art thou not it that ...
Daniel Dahlberg's user avatar
6 votes
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Was Psalm 56:8 written on the basis of a custom which prevailed at that time?

I do not believe that the Psalmist's poetry is based on a custom but on a figure of speech; namely, God feels and understands our sorry and our tears are not "wasted" because it is as if God ...
Dottard's user avatar
  • 110k
6 votes

What is Jesus' argument in John 10:34-36?

There is context to this verse in question Pay close attention to when they interrupt Jesus to determine what they were offended by and what didn’t offend them “I and the Father are one.” John‬ ‭10:...
Nihil Sine Deo's user avatar

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