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5 votes

Isaiah 33:15(d) "He who stops his ears from hearing about bloodshed" modern 21st century English translation issue

It took me about 10 times reading through the question. And I think I might get the premise: The issue isn't as much about the 'bloodshed' as it is about the 'hearing' of it. Specifically, it seems ...
Epimanes's user avatar
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3 votes
Accepted

What is the connection between Y-H-V-H's battle with the dragon and creation in Psalms 74?

Sumerian creation myth and the myths of many related cultures and cultures descendant from it (Like the Akkadians; see the Epic of Atra-hasis and Babylonians) were based off of the Enûma Eliš. Most of ...
James Shewey's user avatar
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3 votes

Does Hosea 14:5-7 echo the themes of Song of Songs?

The answer depends largely on whether or not Hosea interpreted the Song of Songs to be an allegory of God's love for Israel. Jews have often understood it that way. But we also have to wonder whether ...
Dan Fefferman's user avatar
3 votes

Nature, tone, speakers & audiences of the Isaiah 8:5-10 bible passage

Isa 8:8-10 is part of the speech from the LORD which begins in V5. It is in three parts which I will set out to show more clearly: 5 And the LORD spoke to me further: - about Israel 6 “Because ...
Dottard's user avatar
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3 votes

Does the acrostic structure of Lamentations indicate a composition from 5 separate psalms?

Summary In his introduction to Lamentations, Daniel Grossberg has this to say about authorship: Ancient tradition, reflected in the Talmud, the Septuagint, and the Vulgate, ascribes authorship of ...
Revelation Lad's user avatar
2 votes
Accepted

Is John 3:8 an allusion to Ecclesiastes 11:5?

Yes, it is very possible that Jesus had in mind Ecclesiates 11:4-5 as He spoke the words in John 3:8, for the context in Ecclesiastes 11 supports His intention in John 3. Ecclesiastes 11:4-5 (KJV) ...
alb's user avatar
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2 votes

In Genesis 1:26, is there a play on the Hebrew words translated "image" and "likeness" to represent male and female?

Here is the full Genesis 1:16 verse: וַיֹּ֣אמֶר אֱלֹהִ֔ים נַֽעֲשֶׂ֥ה אָדָ֛ם בְּצַלְמֵ֖נוּ כִּדְמוּתֵ֑נוּ וְיִרְדּוּ֩ בִדְגַ֨ת הַיָּ֜ם וּבְע֣וֹף הַשָּׁמַ֗יִם וּבַבְּהֵמָה֙ וּבְכָל־הָאָ֔רֶץ וּבְכָל־...
Tim Biegeleisen's user avatar
2 votes

Nature, tone, speakers & audiences of the Isaiah 8:5-10 bible passage

The RSV starts a fresh paragraph at v9. It might be helpful to regard vv5-8 and vv9-10 as separate messages. But there is one train of thought which links them. Firstly, why is Assyria going to become ...
Stephen Disraeli's user avatar
2 votes

How big were the giants of Amos 2:9 (Amorites) really? Is it poetic, or literal?

Yes, the Amorite were literally really tall people. They are listed with the tribes living in Canaan with the other giants in Gen. 15:18-21. "18 In that day hath Jehovah made with Abram a ...
Gina's user avatar
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2 votes

Is Proverbs 22:19 repetitive emphasis on “you” just an example of Poetic device’s alliteration or are three multiple-layers of reasons for it?

First let me state, again, that proverbs are notoriously difficult to translate; sometimes more difficult that poetry. This is often because they are deliberately vague so as to maximize their ...
Dottard's user avatar
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2 votes

Isaiah 12:2 God is my salvation vs he has become my salvation

This passage is a chiastic synonymous parallelism 1. Chiasmus The chiasmus takes the form A-B-B'-A' A. God is my salvation B. He will keep me safe 2. Synonymous parallelism As Victor Ludlow has ...
Hold To The Rod's user avatar
2 votes
Accepted

Are there practical rules for distinguishing between literal and nonliteral expressions?

I don't know if there is a book that sets out rules for the metaphors and similes in God's word. But, there ought to be as very many people believe the false mantra that everything in the Bible is ...
Gina's user avatar
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2 votes

Does Hosea 14:5-7 echo the themes of Song of Songs?

Given that Hosea wrote his prophecy long after king Solomon had died, and that what is sometimes called "The Song of Solomon" (Song of Songs) is poetic literature, it's questionable whether ...
Anne's user avatar
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2 votes

Nature, tone, speakers & audiences of the Isaiah 8:5-10 bible passage

According to the NABRE, the audience in the first verses is Judah. The "flowing waters of Shiloah," refers to pool of Shiloah in Jerusalem, fed by the Gihon spring. The stream that flows ...
Dan Fefferman's user avatar
2 votes

What is the connection between Y-H-V-H's battle with the dragon and creation in Psalms 74?

The Sumerian and other legends are addressed in @James Shewey's answer. I would like to add something about the Canaanite myth mentioned in the OP's footnote 2. In this story, Ba'al defeats the sea ...
Dan Fefferman's user avatar
2 votes

What is the connection between Y-H-V-H's battle with the dragon and creation in Psalms 74?

All these are echoes and prophecies of the final Redemption to come, per Tikkunei Zohar #21: At that time, all the Chayot will rise up with song, and their "wings spread up to him" in ...
Nissim Nanach's user avatar
1 vote

Viewing (Isaiah 8:5-12) as modern day's Christian journaling of Godly Revelations & Personal Declaration

There are critical differences between Isaiah's writing, or any other scripture, and journaling. They are different in: Purpose Authority Craftsmanship Isaiah wrote a message from God directed at a ...
David D's user avatar
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1 vote

Isaiah 41:1 use of the terms "coastlands" and "islands" a reference to heathen nations as in any nation Other Than the chosen nation of Israel

Isaiah uses the term "coastlands" at least a dozen times in his prophecies. The term combines the more general concept of heathen nations (goy'im - usually translated as "gentiles" ...
Dan Fefferman's user avatar
1 vote

Are there practical rules for distinguishing between literal and nonliteral expressions?

What [Book] contains rules which enable a person to distinguish between literal and nonliteral Biblical expressions? The Guide for the Perplexed written by Maimonides (Rambam) & composed 1190 CE ...
חִידָה's user avatar
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1 vote
Accepted

Does God speak in poetry in Genesis 1?

The only Hebrew poetry is Gen 1 is in V27 which is usually presented as: So God created man in His own image; in the image of God He created him; male and female He created them. The rest of the ...
Dottard's user avatar
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1 vote

Is the speaker in Psalm 22:1 forsaken literally or poetically?

Literally or Poetically? The Book of Psalms, as it is now composed, is a compiled Psalter (hymn book) which contains references to actual events experienced by heroes and nations in Israeli history. ...
ray grant's user avatar
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1 vote

Is the speaker in Psalm 22:1 forsaken literally or poetically?

I take offense to this phrase in one answer: And speaking of Jesus Christ? He was not forsaken on that cross either While David was in a very difficult situation and his prayers were not answered ...
S.A.'s user avatar
  • 59
1 vote

Is the speaker in Psalm 22:1 forsaken literally or poetically?

In a word, no! The reason David was because he was being hunted down by King Saul and he was describing his own feelings of forsakenness. At vs11-13, "Be not far from me, for trouble is near; For ...
Mr. Bond's user avatar
  • 3,645
1 vote

Is the speaker in Psalm 22:1 forsaken literally or poetically?

There are a few things that we should look at here: Genre, Book, Psalm, Sentence Features, and the context of all God's story. I think you've gotten most of that, but I'll try laying it out. For this ...
Kyle Johansen's user avatar
1 vote

Were the words changed to preserve alliteration in Ecclesiastes 12:6-7?

I think you would to reassess your definition of ‘alliteration’. You write: “… pitcher/spring (the p is the alliteration)”. If a single repeated letter – in different positions inside a term, too! - ...
Saro Fedele's user avatar
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1 vote
Accepted

Why is the description of Leviathan much longer than the Behemoth's in Job?

Great question. When considering poetic books like Job, it is good practise to consider the 'objective' of the text - indeed, you're spot-on to ask the question: "this bit is longer... why?" Similarly ...
Steve can help's user avatar
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