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Corinthians 4:11 Is specifically related to Paul in this passage and goes along with Acts 9:16. For I will show him how many things he must suffer for my name's sake." The apostle Paul is describing his fight against the unbelievers and all the pain and suffering they have physically and mentally emotional pain they have brought upon him. It was ...


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The metaphor of "death to sin" is regularly used or alluded to in the NT. Rom 6:1-11 - 1 What then shall we say? Shall we continue in sin so that grace may increase? 2 Certainly not! How can we who died to sin live in it any longer? 3 Or aren’t you aware that all of us who were baptized into Christ Jesus were baptized into His death? 4 We were ...


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"What does 2 Corinthians 4:10-11 mean?" "I don’t understand the meaning, especially 11. I don’t see it as referring to persecution. Agree?" I must disagree. I believe the option you exclude is the most Biblically consistent. One of the Major themes of Paul is that our salvation is actually conditioned on our willingness to suffer with/for ...


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First, note that he is not making value judgments of them as compared to him. He is describing a process. Death in you allows a gift of life to someone else. Death in them allows a gift of life to a third group, etc. The idea of death in the teacher creating life in the student is the lesson being taught. The idea here is that Paul is constantly dying - 1 ...


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‘Sin’ [verb] is something you do. Emphasis on ‘you’ - more about this soon 2 COR 5:10 For we must all appear before the judgment seat of Christ, so that each of us may receive what is due us for the things done while in the body, whether good or bad. But let’s go back a few verses. This whole chapter has been about your ‘body’. Which Paul likens to a ‘tent’...


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Note the context: So we are always of good courage. We know that while we are at home in the body we are away from the Lord, 7 for we walk by faith, not by sight. 8 Yes, we are of good courage, and we would rather be away from the body and at home with the Lord. 9 So whether we are at home or away, we make it our aim to please him. 10 For we must all appear ...


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This answer is from the perspective of the hemeneutic previously referred to as 'sensus plenior'; so-called because it purports to be able to exegete the Old Testament the way the NT authors did; expounding God's intended meaning of which, the human authors were unaware. The foundation - it's all about teaching In the study of 'the mystery, hidden from the ...


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There are probably at least two answers to this question: 1. Similar Questions Message of the NT prophets addressed to specific groups are frequent such as: the seven churches of Asia-minor in Rev 2, 3 specific cases about a particular person and his sin in 1 Cor 5 a series a specific stories about specific people throughout the book of Acts all the ...


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I would suggest two good reasons to understand that Paul's epistles apply to all believers today: They are specifically called "scriptures" by Peter. And account that the longsuffering of our Lord is salvation; even as our beloved brother Paul also according to the wisdom given unto him hath written unto you; As also in all his epistles, speaking ...


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These messages arguably do not contradict. They relate to modesty and women should cover themselves and dress modestly. The veil / covering of hair was usual practice at the time and Nuns still cover their hair / head. 1 Corinthians 11:5-15 – itself appears contradictory. V5 relates to women praying / prophesising – yet v6 appears to make a general point ...


2

I agree with what has already been stated in that long hair and extensively adorned hair are different. I'd also like to add some historical context with respect to 1 Timothy. Timothy is leading the church in Ephesus (1 Timothy 1:3), a major city in its region, where Paul himself had lived for more than 2 years (see Acts 19), and home to the Temple of ...


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This is about unity. The early churches were house gatherings that consisted mostly of people who were poor and did not come from the upper classes. But there were some converts who came from wealthy backgrounds. These were used to adorning themselves with expensive gold and pearls and having servants spend hours elaborately braiding hair and putting on make ...


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1 Corinthians 11:15 NIV but that if a woman has long hair, it is her glory? For long hair is given to her as a covering. Having long hair is natural. 1 Timothy 2:9 NIV I also want the women to dress modestly, with decency and propriety, adorning themselves, not with elaborate hairstyles or gold or pearls or expensive clothes Elaborate hairstyles are ...


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How to understand 1 Timothy 2:9 in light of 1 Corinthians 11:15? Consider another example: Suppose you are drawn to a certain style of dress that could possibly disturb some in the congregation. Yet, you may know of no specific Bible law that forbids it. What is God’s mind on the matter? The apostle Paul offered this inspired counsel: “The women should adorn ...


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"Greek" as a Label for a Gentile Convert to Judaism Gentile, ἔθνος, is different than Greek, Ἕλλην, and the passage should be approached accordingly. There is a nuance which requires Paul to make a distinction between the two, at least in the particular arguments being made. In this case it appears he intends "Greek" to identify someone ...


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