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39

Paul didn't take analytic geometry. People in his day would look at spatial dimensions based on how they would measure them, not on a coordinate system. They could measure length all at once, and width all at once. But, height they would measure from ground/water surface level up, and depth from ground/water surface level down. Combining height and depth ...


10

Epimenides was himself a Cretan who was born in Knossos and died on the island. Apparently he lived in a cave that was sacred to Zeus. I visited that cave almost 40 years ago and was impressed by the extravagant claims surrounding the various myths. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Epimenides If all Cretans are liars, then Epimenides was also a liar. If ...


9

Don't stretch the metaphors too much. While other passages such as 1 Timothy 5:17 do indicate that the ministry of some people is of a higher status than others, what Paul is saying here in 1 Corinthians 3 is that despite differences in our ministries, we're all one team, and it is ultimately God's work, not ours. Both planting and watering are essential ...


8

First, "Moses and the prophets", or sometimes, "the Law of Moses and the prophets", is a common hendiadys meaning what we now call the OT Hebrew scriptures. John 1:45, Luke 16:29, 31, 24:44, Acts 13:15, 26:22, 28:23, Rom 3:21, etc. There are many examples of where the NT writers quoted the OT to show that Jesus fulfilled OT prophecies ...


8

This is quintessential Hebrew idiom based on multiple hyperbole. Paul is trying to convey the matchless riches of God's love and grace and struggles to find words to express it. He uses three metaphors: a tree "rooted and grounded in love", ie, firmly anchored and convinced of God's love size/magnitude, "breadth and length and height and ...


7

Did Saul see Jesus or a bright light? Answer: A bright light. This is an interesting question, because the explanation appears not only in Acts 9, but also Acts 22 in which we read: Acts 22:6-11: “But it happened that as I was on my way, approaching Damascus about noontime, a very bright light suddenly flashed from heaven all around me, and I fell to the ...


7

Everything in creation is subject to decay or entropy. Nothing is permanent in creation. Everything in creation has an end. For the present form of this world is passing away. (1 Cor. 7:31, ESV) And the world is passing away along with its desires, but whoever does the will of God abides forever. (1 John 2:17, ESV) It's the new heaven and new earth that ...


6

Your are pre-supposing that a Paul was supposed to only go to the gentiles. You are saying Jesus told Paul he was an apostle to the gentiles. He was according to ‘theology’ the apostle to the gentiles - but we need to look a little closer.. ROMANS 11:13 For I speak to you Gentiles; inasmuch as I am an apostle to the Gentiles Here Paul is calling himself an ...


5

Paul makes it clear in Romans 7:12 that the law is 'holy and just and good'. But the problem lies in flesh : in me, that is in my flesh there dwelleth no good thing, Romans 7:18. Flesh and blood does not inherit the kingdom of God, as saith Paul, 1 Corinthians 15:50. But nor does flesh and blood possess goodness, in and of itself. It is just flesh. By ...


5

קַל וָחֹמֶר (qal vahome) (from lesser to greater) argument: Jesus used it 9:8–10. Deuteronomy 25:4 was intended as a principle to teach that the laborer should be fed; here Paul may argue in the sense of the common Jewish qal vahomer argument: if for an ox, how much more for a person. Some Jewish teachers felt that God’s teachings about animals were only to ...


5

1 Cor 9:8-10 is a perfect example of arguing from the lesser to the greater - Paul uses the same argument in V7. There are many examples of this type of hermeneutic in the both the OT and the NT. Matt 7:11 - So if you who are evil know how to give good gifts to your children, how much more will your Father in heaven give good things to those who ask Him! ...


5

The punctuation in the NKJV of bracketing the phrase in Rom 7:18, "that is, in my flesh" suggests it is simply a parenthetical remark. Other versions simply use two commas rather than parentheses. The use of the parentheses is not intended to suggest that the phrase is spurious. The text of Rom 7:18 is undisputed. The convention in the NLJV for ...


4

What lies behind the situation is one fact : that the Jews (of that day) wanted Paul to die. They had no good reason. There was no just cause. It is quite clear that, had they the power and authority to execute him, they would have done so, unjustly, with false witnesses. But Rome was the occupying power and Rome did not permit the local authority to have ...


4

In the "scholarly" theological literature (which need not delay us here) there is much debate about whether Paul as "unitarian", "binitarian", or, "trinitarian". There is a huge amount of evidence for all three positions and so this cannot decided on the basis of a single text. This age-old problem will not be ...


4

Short answer There would have been no conflict between Paul and James at the Jerusalem council because in their letters they cited Gen 15:6 for a different purpose. Furthermore, "works" in Galatians means differently and has a different relationship with faith than in James. In Galatians "works" means obeying the law of Moses to be ...


4

Therefore, I urge you, brothers, in view of God’s mercy, to offer your bodies as living sacrifices, holy and pleasing to God—this is your spiritual act of worship. Do not conform any longer to the pattern of this world, but be transformed by the renewing of your mind. Then you will be able to test and approve what God’s will is—his good, pleasing and perfect ...


4

The reason for the difference in translation of these two passages, John 10:33 vs Acts 28:6 is subtle. For completeness let me list the two: John 10:33 - ὅτι σὺ ἄνθρωπος ὢν ποιεῖς σεαυτὸν Θεόν = because you being human make yourself God Acts 28:6 - αὐτὸν εἶναι θεόν = he is a god Grammatically, the two are slightly different with different coupling verbs ...


4

Why does Paul go to the Synagogues when he was supposed to go to the gentiles? Yes, time and again we read that Paul was an "apostle to the nations" (Rom. 11:13). This was his main task to spread the gospel of Jesus. Was Paul only to teach the gentiles? Paul's own words at 1 Cor 9:19-23 let us know to what extent he preached to all people: 19 For ...


4

We could render Paul's statement to mean: Moses said all these things & the prophets said all these things OR Between Moses & the prophets all these things were said The former cannot be unambiguously reconstructed based on the Old Testament; the best we can do there is acknowledge that there are multiple instances in the New Testament where a ...


4

In this case, the translation of the NASB is misleading as it translates two different words with the same English word. Worse than this, one in the original is a noun and the other is a verb and the NASB renders both as nouns! A more literal rendering of Matt 5:33 is provided by the BLB: Again, you have heard that it was said to the ancients, 'You shall ...


4

How to understand 1 Timothy 2:9 in light of 1 Corinthians 11:15? Consider another example: Suppose you are drawn to a certain style of dress that could possibly disturb some in the congregation. Yet, you may know of no specific Bible law that forbids it. What is God’s mind on the matter? The apostle Paul offered this inspired counsel: “The women should adorn ...


4

Why, indeed? My first thought was that the love of Christ is such that he laid down his life for us and literally went into “the depths” – the grave, not to be confused with hell. However, I suspected there was much more to it than that. To find out if there is some interpretive significance to the “depth” of the love of Christ, I went to Matthew Henry’s ...


4

When it comes to translated words, it doesn’t always follow that derivative words must absolutely hold to the root word of the translated language. • δωρεαν - gratuitously Derived from • δωρεά - gift Derived from • δῶρον - gift made sacrificially, offering The adverb in English gratuitously is defined as being without apparent reason, cause, or ...


4

We are not told the answer to the question but here are some other instances of what may have happened. Acts 18:9 - One night the Lord spoke to Paul in a vision: “Do not be afraid; keep on speaking; do not be silent. Acts 23:11 - The following night the Lord stood near Paul and said, “Take courage! As you have testified about Me in Jerusalem, so also you ...


4

GEN 3:17 To Adam he said, “Because you listened to your wife and ate fruit from the tree about which I commanded you, ‘You must not eat from it,’ “Cursed is the ground because of you; ‘Ground’ - ăḏāmâ, the earth, earth substance (Strongs) Through Adam the earth was ‘blessed’. That is, through Adam’s righteousness. Adam was created ‘righteous’ - but so was ...


4

How do you reconcile Rom. 4:2-5 with John 6:28-29: believing a work or not a work? In order to answer this question, I would like to clarify the original wording within both scriptures. The original Greek uses the root word πιστεύω (pisteuó Strong's G4100) which is most often translated as faith. Some scripture that helps to understand these verses is James ...


4

Paul's language, throughout the whole passage cited, is a complicated mixture of past tense, present tense, and future tense. Let me detail that: I thank Christ Jesus our Lord, who has strengthened me, - present tense because He considered me faithful, putting me into service, - past tense 13 even though I was formerly a blasphemer and a persecutor and a ...


3

This will only give the briefest possible introduction to the HUGE topic that the Christian church has debated for 2000 years and was the topic of Church councils, etc. So here I will only quote a few verses and show the main problems. For a more extensive discussion - see the material on the debates at all the church councils where topics such as the ...


3

It is clear that the author here is simply saying that humans have no right to question God, and that's it. Whether that ("have no right") is true or not is a separate question and whether you believe it is true or not depends on your other beliefs. Yes, it may seem unfair if God is completely sovereign but at the same time holds us responsible for ...


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