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The answer is in Numbers 9:6-13, (NKJV): 6 Now there were certain men who were defiled by a human corpse, so that they could not keep the Passover on that day; and they came before Moses and Aaron that day. 7 And those men said to him, “We became defiled by a human corpse. Why are we kept from presenting the offering of the Lord at its appointed time ...


6

Legal Justification The underlying legal basis for Hezekiah's action is found in Numbers: The LORD spoke to Moses, saying, “Speak to the people of Israel, saying, If any one of you or of your descendants is unclean through touching a dead body, or is on a long journey, he shall still keep the Passover to the LORD. In the second month on the fourteenth ...


6

Exodus 12:8-9 mandates that the passover sacrifice be roasted with fire (צְלִי־אֵ֔שׁ), and prohibits its consumption when raw or when boiled in water (נָ֔א וּבָשֵׁ֥ל מְבֻשָּׁ֖ל בַּמָּ֑יִם). In contrast, Deuteronomy 16:7 uses the same verb (בֹשׁל) to describe the mandated preparation method. The definitions given in HALOT for בֹשׁל (also בָּשֵׁל) for each ...


6

Exodus 12:9 and Deut 16:7 appear in contradiction, because the former indicates there shall not be any boiling of the Passover (but only the roasting), and the latter passage states the opposite, which is the boiling (since the Hebrew verb בָּשַׁל means to boil, or to cook). In the Pentateuch, the Hebrew verb בָּשַׁל in the Piel stem also occurs in the ...


6

They were to eat the lamb roasted over fire because it was quick: the same reason they were to eat it with their cloak tucked into their belt, their sandals on their feet and their staff in their hand. “Eat it in haste; it is the LORD's Passover.” (Exodus 12:11) They did not know exactly when the LORD was going to call them out but they were to be prepared ...


5

The word "finish" appears in Daniel 9:24, in the context of the Messiah's' atoning sacrifice, which appears in verse 26. “Seventy weeks have been decreed for your people and your holy city, to finish, (συντελεσθῆναι, Greek Septuagint : LXX-Th, OG) the transgression, to make an end of sin, to make atonement for iniquity, to bring in everlasting righteousness,...


5

The phrase actually translates one word in Greek, tetelestai, from the root tele­ō, which means "to finish, fulfill." Significantly, this specific form of the verb, tetelestai, is only found twice in the entire New Testament, both times in John 19. In fact, the two occurrences of tetelestai are found within three verses of each other: "After this, Jesus, ...


4

OP writes: Or maybe, does the original account of Passover tell us who this being is? Exodus 11:4-5; 12:12-13, 23, 29 is quite unambiguous: it is the LORD who takes life. 29 At midnight the Lord struck down all the firstborn in Egypt, from the firstborn of Pharaoh, who sat on the throne, to the firstborn of the prisoner, who was in the dungeon, and ...


4

Quite difficult to explain, as it was noticed many times that it is not typical of the law codes of the Torah generally to explain the basis for their requirements or prohibitions. So maybe we have to take the risk of an "I think that the significance of leaven in the OT was this" kind of answer. One very practical explanation: Daat Zkenim on Leviticus 2:...


4

Firstfruits and Unleavened Bread In addition to the command to eat unleavened bread at Passover and during the 7-days of Unleavened bread, bread for the sanctuary had to be made every week of the year and the priests could eat the week-old bread: “You shall take fine flour and bake twelve loaves from it; two tenths of an ephah shall be in each loaf. And ...


4

Does it relate to Exodus 12:15 15 For seven days you shall eat unleavened bread, but on the first day you shall remove dough with yeast from your houses; for whoever eats anything with yeast from the first day until the seventh day, that [a]person shall be cut off from Israel. where the preparation day seems to be considered the first day, and involve the ...


4

The Torah itself does not specify who reaps the grain, but it does state that “an omer of the first-fruits of your harvest” is brought “to the priest,” so we may deduce that it was not the priest who reaped the grain. Footnotes         1 Lev. 23:10 The process itself is elaborated at length in the Talmud, which states,2 כיצד הן עושין שלוחי בית דין יוצאין ...


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1. Scripture - There is a key part of your Luke 22:36, (from Isaiah 53:12) reference where Yeshua says, "...For I tell you this: the passage from the Tanakh that says, ‘He was counted with transgressors,’ has to be fulfilled in me; since what is happening to me has a purpose.” 2. Explanation - In response to, "widely held Christian tradition", this is ...


3

The lamb was to be roasted with fire not eaten raw or boiled. The lamb was to be proportioned between households so that everything would be eaten: …every man shall take a lamb according to their fathers’ house, a lamb for a household. And if the household is too small for a lamb, then he and his nearest neighbor shall take according to the number of ...


2

I believe that the laws of the Passover sacrifice closely resemble the laws which apply to all of the sacrifices which took place in the ancient Temple. The Passover sacrifice was unique among all the sacrifices in one important way. The commandment to offer the Passover sacririce was given before the Temple (or even the Tabernacle) existed. This means ...


2

Was the Last Supper a Passover meal? Many scholars claim that the Synoptists "clearly" describe the Last Supper as a Passover meal. And then the Apostle John clearly overturns that, indicating that the Passover was yet future of Jesus' trials and crucifixion. Though reading the Synoptic Gospel accounts seems to indicate a Passover meal was being prepared, ...


2

John's Gospel differs from the synoptic gospels in that it does not mention the Last Supper as a sacred feast (cf Mark 14:18-26), instead having Jesus wash the feet of the disciples after what appears to have been the normal supper meal (John 13:2). Clearly, the author of John's Gospel was aware that the crucifixions could not take place on the Day of the ...


2

The first uses in the LXX are in Numbers 25 describing the incident at Shittim: And Israel was initiated to Beel-Phegor, and the Lord was angry with wrath against Israel. (v 3) (NET) και ετελεσθη ισραηλ τω βεελφεγωρ και ωργισθη θυμω κυριος τω ισραηλ (LXX) And Moses said to the tribes of Israel, "Each of you kill his family-member who has been ...


2

One thing that is often missed in the Bible texts is that the day in question is often included in the numbering of days. Passover was on the evening of the 14th, which was a Thursday. The 14th is included in the 6 day numbering, being that the daytime of the 14th is a day. Thursday, 14th-6, Wednesday, 13th-5, Tuesday, 12th-4, Monday, 11th-3, Sunday, 10th-2, ...


2

I did not see a response to my comment about providing a strictly New Testament answer, so I’m taking a risk that you may find this response useful. I apologize if the NT doctrine here offends you but to properly address your question, we must address the fundamental difference between Judaism and Christianity, namely Law vs Grace. The use (or non use) of ...


2

Were some Egyptians saved? We can speculate, but that's all since no such exemption is mentioned. On the contrary, Exodus 12:30 tells us there was loud wailing throughout Egypt, כִּי־אֵין בַּיִת אֲשֶׁר אֵין־שָׁם מֵת for there was no house in which there was no one dead. Of course, the OT often uses language about total destruction hyperbolically, such ...


2

Exodus 12:8 That same night they are to eat the meat roasted over the fire, along with bitter herbs, and bread made without yeast. Vertically, the Israelites were commanded to make bread without yeast. Horizontally, it was happening this way: 31 During the night Pharaoh summoned Moses and Aaron and said, “Up! Leave my people, you and the Israelites! Go, ...


2

Let's see the parallelism: Judah became God's sanctuary, Israel his dominion Judah יְהוּדָ֣ה (yə·hū·ḏāh) Noun - proper - masculine singular became הָיְתָ֣ה (hā·yə·ṯāh) Verb - Qal - Perfect - third person feminine singular Judah is masculine yet the verb is feminine, so this is a figure of speech to mean the land (feminine) of Judah. ...


2

The "day of preparation" is neither a holiday nor a holy day. There is nothing official about it. Perhaps the biggest cause of confusion is that the translators chose to capitalize it, making it seem like a proper noun. For the weekly sabbath, and those high holidays that are treated as sabbaths (High Sabbaths - Wikipedia), people must do extra ...


1

The answer to the question is "No". The important thing to remember is that what we understand by a day and even what day we consider Passover to be, may not be what a first-century Jew would think - and certain first-century Jews celebrated Passover according to a different calendar to the "official" calendar. John uses the official calendar but the ...


1

This is traditionally explained in terms of Jesus and the disciples arriving in Bethany six days prior, but John not giving the specific day of the anointing. I can't do any better here than to simply quote Calvin: "Having come to Bethany six days before the passover, he remained there four days; which may easily be inferred from Matthew and Mark. On ...


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