7

The Idea in Brief Jesus compared his death to Jonah, who was in the belly of the great fish for three days and three nights (Matt 12:40). Jonah had related his ordeal not only in terms of having been swallowed by the great fish but also as having been "at the roots of the mountains" (Jonah 2:6); that is, Jonah stated that "the earth with its bars was around"...


6

Clarification on Terms My definitions for clarification. Evening: The period of the Sun descending toward the horizon to set. Sunset: The exact time the Sun is no longer visible above the horizon. Evening Twilight: The period of decreasing light between Sunset and Dusk. Dusk: The exact time all sunlight is no longer visible in the western sky. Night: The ...


6

The members of the Sanhedrin are here blackmailing Pilate by saying that they will spread rumors about him or even directly inform the Emperor that he released the enemy of the Rome who claimed illegitimately that he was the king of Jews. The releaser of a political enemy would automatically be considered as a complacent to this enemy and thus also a co-...


5

My sense is that the reaction of Thomas is not the best place to raise the question of Jesus somehow looking different in the post-resurrection appearances. Thomas had, after all, the testimony of the other ten disciples (or possibly a larger group if "disciples" is not limited to the remnant of the Twelve), and there is the clear expectation that he should ...


5

Jewish culture during the Second Temple period was heavily influenced by the Babylonians. E. G. Richards says in Mapping Time, pages 221-222, that the seven-day Jewish week, although of great antiquity, was possibly of Babylonian origin. During the Babylonian Captivity the Jews adopted the Babylonian calendar and began to use month names that were based on ...


5

The phrase actually translates one word in Greek, tetelestai, from the root tele­ō, which means "to finish, fulfill." Significantly, this specific form of the verb, tetelestai, is only found twice in the entire New Testament, both times in John 19. In fact, the two occurrences of tetelestai are found within three verses of each other: "After this, Jesus, ...


5

The word "finish" appears in Daniel 9:24, in the context of the Messiah's' atoning sacrifice, which appears in verse 26. “Seventy weeks have been decreed for your people and your holy city, to finish, (συντελεσθῆναι, Greek Septuagint : LXX-Th, OG) the transgression, to make an end of sin, to make atonement for iniquity, to bring in everlasting righteousness,...


5

Pilate was a skilled politician, and typical Roman tactics were to be unconcerned with the internal politics of vassal regions. As long as tributes were paid and there were no uprisings, the Roman empire was typically unconcerned. In fact, the Roman empire actually preferred drama in their vassal states as this divided and conflicted the region. So long as ...


5

Important note about this question: this is not a question about all Jews at the time or all Jewish people in general. This is a question about why the interactions between a handful of very specific people - the Sanhedrin and Pilate - played out the way they did. I'm not sure you can skip the context. You really need the full picture here to see why it ...


5

Pilate was not a very smart man (according to the historical records we have) and here he makes a token gesture at justice. The Sanhedrin hated Jesus but the people loved Him. It was the people who had hailed Jesus as king of the Jews and Messiah less than a week earlier at the triumphal entry to Jerusalem. Thus, Pilate attempts to appeal to the masses as ...


5

He means that He taught all those things, for which He is now held answerable before the Sanhedrin as a blasphemer, openly. What are those things? That He is the promised Messiah (Luke 4:21); that He is Savior of not only Jews, but the world (John 12:47; Matthew 28:19); that He has the same dignity and authority as God the Father (John 5:23), for He is His ...


4

Answer: At that time of Spring, (the Vernal Equinox), the hours of the day would have corresponded with each other - regardless of the System used. Temporal vs. Fixed Hours: The first problem in using the day is to decide when it begins and ends – its phase – so that events may be assigned to a day without ambiguity. Some nations decided to begin their ...


4

The second of the two subjunctive verbs in Mark 14:12 is unproblematic: in classical and post-classical Greek the conjunction ἵνα is always followed by a verb in the subjunctive mode if the verb in the principal clause is in the present tense (as it is here). This is simply a rule of Greek grammar. The first of the two subjunctives is slightly more ...


4

"It is finished" The finished in v.28 "all was now finished", is the same Gr. telein as in v.30. Acc. to R.E. Brown1, this "has the connotation of completion as well as that of simple ending." He adds, "Occasionally it has sacrificial overtones." He also relates this telein to the telos of John 13:1 "he now loved ...


4

Οἱ οὖν Ἰουδαῖοι, ἐπεὶ παρασκευὴ ἦν, ἵνα μὴ μείνῃ ἐπὶ τοῦ σταυροῦ τὰ σώματα ἐν τῷ σαββάτῳ, ἦν γὰρ μεγάλη ἡ ἡμέρα ἐκείνου τοῦ σαββάτου, ἠρώτησαν τὸν Πειλᾶτον / Πιλᾶτον ἵνα κατεαγῶσιν αὐτῶν τὰ σκέλη καὶ ἀρθῶσιν. The greek text explicitly states that the motivation for breaking the legs was so that bodies could be removed for preparation for the sabbath. There ...


4

"Did Pilate acknowledge Jesus as the King of the Jews - challenging Herod's own claim?" Have a look at this: John 19:10-12 ESV So Pilate said to him, “You will not speak to me? Do you not know that I have authority to release you and authority to crucify you?” Jesus answered him, “You would have no authority over me at all unless it had been given you ...


4

I am not aware of a law requiring the charge to be hung. However, there is record by Cassius Dio of the same practice having taken place in the Roman world. but in the case of the second slave, who had deserted his son, led him through the midst of the Forum with an inscription making known the reason why he was to be put to death, and afterwards ...


4

And they had then a notable prisoner, called Barabbas. Therefore when they were gathered together, Pilate said unto them, Whom will ye that I release unto you? Barabbas, or Jesus which is called Christ? For he knew that for envy they had delivered him. Matthew 27:16, 17,18 KJV] The scribes and Pharisees, the religious leaders, desired the chief seats in ...


4

The surrounding verses provide valuable context: 15 Now at the feast the governor was accustomed to release for the crowd any one prisoner whom they wanted. 16 And they had then a notorious prisoner, called Barabbas. 17 So when they had gathered, Pilate said to them, “Whom do you want me to release for you, Barabbas or Jesus who is called Christ?” 18 For he ...


4

Did Judas Expect Jesus to be Rescued? There are several good reasons why we should dismiss such an idea. Two of them are as follows: Any extrabiblical source that, on the surface, might seem to shed light is invariably unhelpful (even blasphemous, e.g. Book of Enoch, and here: The Gospel of Judas). Throughout the texts, Judas is repeatedly referred to as &...


3

1. Scripture - There is a key part of your Luke 22:36, (from Isaiah 53:12) reference where Yeshua says, "...For I tell you this: the passage from the Tanakh that says, ‘He was counted with transgressors,’ has to be fulfilled in me; since what is happening to me has a purpose.” 2. Explanation - In response to, "widely held Christian tradition", this is ...


3

Consider understanding: a) Judges 19: 4-5, and the difference between the Hebrew text and the Greek text (LXX). His father-in-law, the girl’s father, persuaded him to stay with him for three days, and they ate and drank together, and spent the night there. On the fourth day they woke up early and the Levite got ready to leave. But the girl’s father said to ...


3

Matthew 12:38-40 is often quoted in the context of the timing of Jesus death, burial and resurrection, but seldom is the cryptic nature of Jesus’ reply to the request by his enemies for a sign, alluded to (e.g. the phrase “the heart of the earth” is not a literal phrase). Also, seldom is sufficient attention drawn to precisely who it is that Jesus is ...


3

In all four gospel accounts Pilate lobbies for Jesus to be spared his eventual fate of execution, and acquiesces only when the crowd refuses to relent. The gospels describe various attempts by Pilate to avoid responsibility include offering to free Jesus instead of Barabbas, including sending him to Herod Antipas for trial (Luke 23:7) and telling the Jews ...


3

In addition to Nigel's excellent answer, I suggest here another motive. John 11:47 Then the chief priests and the Pharisees called a meeting of the Sanhedrin. “What are we accomplishing?” they asked. “Here is this man performing many signs. 48If we let him go on like this, everyone will believe in him, and then the Romans will come and take away both our ...


3

It appears that Jesus the Christ and Barabbas shared the same name: Jesus. I can think of a few line of 'evidence' for this. Manuscripts The first is that some of the earliest manuscripts actually had "Jesus Barabbas." So if it wasn't original to the text itself, it seems nonetheless to have been an accepted tradition, explaining its inclusion in ...


3

Jesus was making a distinction between himself and the false messiahs who were politically subversive wanting to drive the Romans out of Judah. He taught openly in the Temple, where Roman soldiers watched his every move. The temple area is about thirty-five acres. At that time, around three sides of that large enclosure there was a long, covered walkway. ...


2

I think we should allow the text to say exactly what it says. Jesus was crucified on the day of the Passover at the time when the Passover lamb was slaughtered, and died late on Friday afternoon, "the preparation day"; Matt 27:57, 62, Mark 15:42, Luke 23:54, John 19:41. The next day was to be the Sabbath; Matt 27:62-65, Luke 23:56. Jesus had His ...


2

I am in total agreement with what Revelation Lad wrote. I would add only three additional things. When Jesus broke bread and passed it to His disciples, He broke artos which is normal leavened bread. Were He eating the Passover with His disciples, He would have been eating azumos, unleavened bread. No later than the beginning of Nisan 14 (the day of ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible