14

Summarizing Hastings Dictionary of Christ and the Gospels entry on wine bottles: In ancient Israel, the grapes were pressed in the winepress and left in the collection vats for a few days. Fermentation starts immediately on pressing, and this allows the first "tumultuous" (gassy) phase to pass. Then the must (fermenting juice) was put in clay jars to be ...


14

We should first note that Jesus is telling a parable. A parable is a form of comparison to help us understand something that is difficult or abstract. The word parable means "to cast alongside." You "cast alongside" something known to help the audience understand something unknown. In this case, the unknown is the Kingdom of God (Mark 2:...


12

The Greek ζιζάνια for tares/weeds has often been understood as a reference to darnel (a type of ryegrass, see here). If so, the meaning is clarified. Wheat & darnel look essentially the same in their early growth stages; they can be distinguished when they are mature. So trying to uproot the weeds right away would risk: Missing some of the weeds by ...


10

It can be somewhat dangerous exegetically to try to force too much meaning into a specific word or phrase from a parable. Parables are meant to be evocative illustrations (not encrypted cyphers), so dissecting them too rigidly is akin to assigning specific meaning to every brush stroke in a Van Gogh painting. The most important thing, when approaching one of ...


10

Warning. Giant wall of text from my master's thesis upcoming. tl;dr; It is likely that the discount applied by the steward had no impact on his employer because of the practice of adding excessive commission to sales. The discount can be seen as the steward discounting his own commission in order to gain favor with the debtors. The Parable of The Steward (...


10

Setting to the scene The parable of the Good Samaritan is told by Jesus shortly after an expert of the law summarizes the law into 1) Love God and 2) Love your neighbor. This scene occurs in the town of Jerusalem (Luke 9:51-55.) The text then states in verse 29, But the expert [of the law], wanting to justify himself, said to Jesus, “And who is my neighbor?”...


8

At the beginning of Jesus’ ministry he taught by using analogies that would be readily understood by everyone – salt, bread, sheep – and the meaning would be clear within the context of his teaching. Later on, he employed parables and the parable about the sower and the seed that fell onto four different types of soil was the first. His audience was a ...


7

This answer is just a brief attempt at the leading question, "What is the meaning of this parable?" Interest is expressed in Matthew's version of the parable in particular. The "sower and seed" parable appears in each of the three Synoptic Gospels, Matt 13:3-25 // Mk 4:3-20 // Luke 8:5-15, with some variations in the parable and its explanation. This is ...


7

It may likely grow into the Sinapis Nigra (Black Mustard). It can grow to eight feet tall, so it could actually be literally used by small birds to nest on its branches. However parables are not to be taken so literally and the image may be a slight exaggeration as part in parcel with the point of the passage. In the OT mustard is not mentioned. Yet later ...


7

This attempt to answer the question "Why 5:5?" falls into four parts: (1) number symbolism; (2) the Matthean context; (3) why ten?; and (4) why 5:5? Number symbolism in Judaism (OP) I know that the numbers in Jewish culture have special meaning. While this is certainly true, it is difficult to see what particular symbolism the number five (or ten, for ...


7

he [Jesus] says that it is inappropriate to share the meaning behind parables with the masses Jesus didn't say or imply that. If anyone asked a disciple what Jesus told him about the hidden meaning of the parable, he would readily repeat what Jesus had told him. It was not a secret. Jesus didn't give any instruction to his disciples not to reveal the hidden ...


6

Meaning of κόκκῳ σινάπεως This is more or less just some additional information, Mike's answer is good. According to the IVP NT Commentary series: Scholars still dispute what plant is meant by the “mustard seed.” Nevertheless, by no conjecture is it the smallest of all seeds that Jesus’ listeners could have known (the orchid seed is smaller); the ...


6

The parables’ interpretation hinges on the identity of Jesus’ brothers. While it is true that at least some of these “brothers” are in need, their need does not define them. The need simply identifies them as the “least.” Jesus, in Matthew 12:48, has already made known the identity of his “brothers.” Who are my mother and my brothers?” Then pointing ...


6

I agree with the gist of several comments and previous answers that the oil does not need to have an specific symbolic meaning for the parable to make sense. That said, meaning can still be tied to the oil, and on that subject I think the questioner is on the right track. Meaning of parable as a whole To understand the (possible) meaning of the oil, one ...


6

The Kingdom is not like the man but like the man who sowed seed (Luke 13:24). We are then given an explanation about the parable's symbols: The sower is the Son of Man (v37) The field is the world [of people] (v38) Good seed is people of the Kingdom (v38) Weeds are people of the evil one (v38) The enemy who sows the weeds is the devil (v39) The harvest is ...


6

This passage is the conclusion of a string of events attested to in this chapter, and so we must take these events together to understand the broader context. Parables about Obedience and Judgement Just prior to this passage, the chief priests and elders had demanded a proof of Jesus' authority (Matthew 21:23-27). In response, he had asked them to judge ...


6

What an interesting question, one that gave me pause to stop and think. It is obvious that the produce from a vineyard is grapes, but what do “grapes” represent in this parable? The context in which Jesus delivers this parable is important. Mark 12:12 proves that Jesus’ parable was being made against the chief priests and scribes who wanted to silence ...


6

To answer this question, let us first crack the metaphor of this strange parable, that taken at a face value, approves cheating for one's personal benefit. a) Within the context of the parable, the friends are those people whom the clever steward has helped by his unjust reducing of their debts to their - and his - master. They will definitely become his ...


6

In answering this question, we MUST remember that it is a PARABLE!! It is not necessarily literally true but teaches an important spiritual lesson. However, we observe several things about the foolish virgins who are distinguished ONLY by the amount of oil they possessed. Note the comments of Ellicott: (3) Took no oil with them.—In the interpretation of ...


5

Oil symbolises something without which it is impossible to enter the Kingdom of Heaven. Moreover, this something is that which does not depend solely on the merit of God, for otherwise all virgins, i.e. all Christians, would have had it; on the contrary, the possession of the oil depends also on the merit of the virgins themselves, for otherwise their ...


5

The robe, ring & sandals help show the father’s high level of love, honor and authority for the son. The robe and the ring are symbolic of how well the father will be treating his son (i.e. somewhat like Jacob and Pharaoh treated the favorite son Joseph). Jacob honored Joseph by getting him a long tunic, and the jealous brothers saw how Jacob was the ...


5

Keep in mind that the parable is given in the context of a lawyer who knows the commandments and seeks to justify himself by defining who should be considered his neighbor. Priests and Levites were people vocationally called to be ministers to God. Traditionally, they would have followed all the rituals and rules that were prescribed in the Law. The ...


5

But recently I heard it suggested there might be a connection to the birds in the Parable of the Sower just a little before this passage The way the parable is phrased doesn't lend itself to any negative allegorical interpretation of the birds. The concept of nesting under protection is hard to square with any link to the birds in the parable of the soils: ...


5

According to the OT this is true, in part. I’m sure that centuries later it might have been modified, where if a father rejects his son the community would purge the son from their midst without the parent’s initiative, especially in a society that is heavily based on honor (and shame). “"If a man has a stubborn and rebellious son who will not obey the ...


5

Excellent question? In fact I was thinking about this parable today and then I spotted your question. One of the main points of the parable is the fact that The Son Jesus Christ preexisted His incarnation. I looked through some of my papers from 12 years ago and found a detailed explanation by a man named James Montgomery Boice. Under the title of his paper ...


5

@HoldToTheRod did an excellent job of explaining the agricultural references being made. I would just point out that the OT background for this parable includes: [Jer 31:27 NASB20] 27 "Behold, days are coming," declares the LORD, "when I will sow the house of Israel and the house of Judah with the seed of mankind and the seed of animals. [...


4

The natural antipathy between the old (Judaism) and the new (Jesus's message) is what Jesus spoke of in His wineskin/garment analogies. He thought Judaism was brittle and inflexible, like an old wineskin, or a worn-out garment not fit to wear. In Jesus' day, unfermented grape juice was placed in wineskins instead of bottles. If the wineskin container was ...


4

A parable, I have been taught since childhood, is a "heavenly story with an earthly meaning," which is good as far as it goes. The word parable, however, carries with it the idea of placing alongside. What is placed alongside what? you may ask. The answer is: Our lives are placed alongside the story, and the point of the story is meant to stir ...


4

A parable is not necessarily a story, although most parables in the Gospels are stories. Psalm 49:4 and Psalm 78:2 say that a "parable" is a "dark saying". Ezekiel 17: 2 says a parable is a riddle. Habakkuk 2:6 says a parable is a "taunting proverb". When you realize that parables are basically coded ways of speaking, then the parable of the fig tree is ...


4

The clear questions posed might be worded this way: how, in Roman-era Palestine, would an imprisoned slave pay back a financial debt? The impetus comes from Jesus' parable of the unforgiving servant/slave of Matthew 18:21-35. It really requires an answer in two parts: first, to explain why the concern of OP's main question would not be in the thoughts of ...


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