New answers tagged

0

Indeed, from this point on, the same man is called both "Jacob" and "Israel" in the text. Not only that, but after Abram and Sarai were renamed by God, thereafter they were known exclusively by their new names; unlike with Jacob, their old names are not used again except, just twice, to say the name “Abram” was changed. Meanwhile, the ...


3

Matt 1:1 is not even a sentence because it consists only of eight nouns, all in the genitive case, except the first which in the nominative case. Thus, the first verse is only a title (as is obvious) and thus might be literally translated: Book (of) genealogy (of) Jesus (of) Christ (of) son (of) David (of) son (of) Abraham. This phrase even lack any ...


5

Immanuel was a metaphoric name for a child which symbolised the wonderful future for Zion. It meant that God "would be with Zion", (would be with us) and there is no reason for Ahaz to fear his enemies. Zion was symbolised by a virgin or a young girl. It appears it was a habit for prophets to use the metaphoric names of children or babies for ...


3

The distinction between a "name" and a "title" is highly blurred in the Bible, assuming such a distinction can be made at all. For example, are the following names or titles of God: Elyon (God Most High), El-Shaddai (God Almighty), Adonai (Lord), "I Am", etc? The same is true of Immanuel which means (Matt 1:23), Μεθ’ ἡμῶν ὁ ...


Top 50 recent answers are included