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Stephen's long and meandering history may not appear to have a point, let alone answer the charges leveled against him. But Stephen is indeed addressing these charges: “This man never ceases to speak words against this holy place and the law, for we have heard him say that this Jesus of Nazareth will destroy this place and will change the customs ...


8

This would take a book to answer well, but here's the gist: Israel out of Egypt? Israel in the Pentateuch was typological of God's people (cf. 1 Cor. 10) (God's people would have to leave "Egypt", pass through the "water", follow God through the "wilderness", live by God's "law", etc.) Israel failed to actually be God's people (cf. Hos. 11 and the rest ...


8

A supplement to Mark Edward's answer: Though "strength" and "praise" are two very different words, the "strength" in Ps 8 in the Hebrew text comes from "mouths", and the psalm is about praising God. It is not a stretch to think that the psalm talks about praise from the infants' mouths. Moreover, the New Testament seldom quotes the Old Testament word for ...


8

As the OP correctly notes, Hebrews 1:6: ὅταν δὲ πάλιν εἰσαγάγῃ τὸν πρωτότοκον εἰς τὴν οἰκουμένην, λέγει Καὶ προσκυνησάτωσαν αὐτῷ πάντες ἄγγελοι θεοῦ. (Westcott and Hort) And again, when he brings the firstborn into the world, he says, “Let all God's angels worship him.” (ESV) is most likely a quote of an LXX version of Deuteronomy 32:43 ...


7

One argument that has been made is that the care for the righteous, i.e. the preservation of a man's (David's) bones in suffering, imagery is joined up with the passover theme. In the passover they were not to break any bones of the sacrificial Lamb. 46 “It must be eaten inside the house; take none of the meat outside the house. Do not break any of the ...


7

The explanation is not contradictory. First we see how Paul expands the meaning of Habakkuk 2:4 in the relevant verse here in Romans - Romans 1:17 (GNT) δικαιοσύνη γὰρ θεοῦ ἐν αὐτῷ ἀποκαλύπτεται ἐκ πίστεως εἰς πίστιν, καθὼς γέγραπται, Ὁ δὲ δίκαιος ἐκ πίστεως ζήσεται. The key in this verse is that we live "from faith to faith" (ἐκ πίστεως εἰς πίστιν). ...


7

Not ambiguous, but inclusive in meaning Ambiguity implies two or more possible meanings that are unclear as to which it is, or more broadly simply being unclear. I do not believe that is the situation here at all. Examining the statements Let's start with the basically undisputed OT reference Paul is using in Romans. Habakkuk 2:4 The (very literal) ...


7

In Hebrew, the first "Lord" is Yahweh (God's name), and the second "Lord" really means Lord. So the text is "Yahweh said to my Lord." The way Peter uses the words in Acts 2:34 seems to indicate that the second Lord is the Messiah. This is also corroborated by Matthew 22:42-45.


7

The short answer to OP's question regarding the teaching in James 2:10: Is it in the torah? is: "No". A much longer answer discusses James's teaching as derived from Jesus (depending on Douglas Moo), and the essentials are given there. It is important to note, however, that this understanding of the law (i.e., breaking one bit is like breaking the ...


7

In the temptation story, Jesus is quoting a scripture passage, introduced by the words "It is written." The focus at that point is Jesus acknowledging the truth and authority of God's word. He is saying in effect, God has spoken and I must submit to that word. In the Sermon on the Mount, the focus is different. Jesus here is a rabbi teaching his disciples (...


6

The evidence strongly suggests that when New Testament authors refer to scripture, or say "it is written", they are referring to pre-Christian Jewish sacred writings and not what is now the New Testament. The one possible exception is the author of 2 Peter. (I hesitate to say "Hebrew Bible" for three reasons. First, most of them use the Septuagint ...


6

The Tanakh (the Old Testament) is replete with prophecies concerning the Messiah. Beginning with Genesis 3:15, also called the protoevangelium, there are hints, allusions, and explicit references to the identity, the roles, and the work of the promised Messiah. Jesus explained (likely) every one of them in His conversation with Cleopas and an unnamed ...


6

Matthew 27:46: ܘܠܐܦܝ ܬܫܥ ܫܥܝܢ ܩܥܐ ܝܫܘܥ ܒܩܠܐ ܪܡܐ ܘܐܡܪ ܐܝܠ ܐܝܠ ܠܡܢܐ ܫܒܩܬܢܝ Around (in the surface, face of) the ninth hour (3 o'clock in Roman time), Jesus yelled in a loud voice, saying "Ayl Ayl lamana shabaqthani" Written Ayl Ayl, lamana shabaqthani, Ayl means God in Syriac. It's independently ܐܝܠ but ܐܠ as a compound in names. lamana ...


6

It certainly apears that John 8:58 is an allusion to Psa. 90:2 since both share the same syntax.1 Both Meyer2 and De Wette3 refer to Psa. 90:2 in their commentary on John 8:58. On his notes of Psa. 90:2,4 Frederick Field wrote,5 Jerome in Epistle to Sunnias and Fretela: “You are God.” And you say that “God” isn’t in the Greek [manuscript]. It is clear that [...


5

This is a messianic vision, and David is primarily concerned here with Christ and his place with God, and his Priesthood Authority. I see the first part of your question as having two elements. Element 1, "The Lord says to My Lord" is a conversation between God The Father (Elohim) and Christ The Son (Jesus Christ). Element 2, it was necessary to ...


5

This text consists of five imperatives: κήρυξον τὸν λόγον, | kēryxon ton logon | (Preach the Word) ἐπίστηθι εὐκαίρως ἀκαίρως, | epistēthi eukairōs akairōs | (be ready in season [and] out of season) ἔλεγξον, | elenxon | (reprove) ἐπιτίμησον, | epitimēson | (rebuke) παρακάλεσον, | parakaleson | (exhort) ἐν πάσῃ μακροθυμίᾳ καὶ διδαχῇ. | en pasē makrothymia ...


5

Possible Parallels A number of commentators seem to consider the possibility that Luke deduces parallels between the two events. Among those who see some link are Bruce (NICNT), Longnecker (EBC), Polhill (NAC), and Witherington (SRC). F.F. Bruce writes: The story of Ananias is to the book of Acts what the story of Achan is to the book of Joshua. In both ...


5

INDICATIONS OF LXX PROVERBS 1:7 IN GREEK NEW TESTAMENT(?) Conlusion: There are indications (reasons) to believe the LXX of Proverbs 1:7 has an canonical-theological influence, but the specific evidence of a references to this verse in the Gk. New Testament appears to be indeterminate. Nevertheless, we ourselves, may be reminded, wherever we read εὐσέβεια ...


5

Psalm 110:1 New International Version Of David. A psalm. The LORD says to my lord: "Sit at my right hand until I make your enemies a footstool for your feet." The LORD יְהוָ֨ה ׀ (Yah·weh) Noun - proper - masculine singular Strong's Hebrew 3068: LORD -- the proper name of the God of Israel to my Lord: לַֽאדֹנִ֗י (adoni) Preposition-l | Noun - ...


5

James got the idea that "if you break one commandment, you break them all", right from Scripture of course. Cursed be he that confirmeth not all the words of this law to do them. And all the people shall say, Amen. -- Deuteronomy 27:26 KJV And say thou unto them, Thus saith the LORD God of Israel; Cursed be the man that obeyeth not the words of ...


5

The comment of the Apostle Paul that “The worker deserves his pay” appears to have been the prevailing interpretation of this verse according to the oral traditions of the Jews during the First Century and beyond. For example, in regard to this passage from Deuteronomy, the Jewish historian Flavius Josephus wrote the following in his compendium on the ...


5

The question in a sense has no answer because it contains an incorrect premise - that Jesus and John were 'cuddling'. As Benson says, "This phrase only expresses the then customary posture at meals, where the guests all leaned sideways on couches, and each was said to lie in the bosom of him who was placed next above him" https://biblehub.com/...


4

Good question. There are many fascinating aspects of Paul's hermeneutic that come to the fore here, and we need to do some digging to recognize the source of the connections which he makes. How is Hagar connected to Sinai? First, the connection is there simply in terms of Paul's own controlling metaphor. Throughout Gal 3:22 and onward, Paul has been ...


4

The question and the answers suffers from the assumption that the Psalms are prophecy, rather than statements of fact or faith, and also from the inconvenience that in context, Christologic explanations make no sense. The theme of Psalm 34, written by King David, is God's relationship with the righteous and evildoers. According to Rabbi Samson Raphael ...


4

The Idea in Brief In both passages (in Deuteronomy and Romans) the "Word of God" is what saves man. According to the Christian New Testament, this same "Word of God" was in direct reference to Jesus of Nazareth. Discussion In the Christian New Testament in Romans Chapter 10, the Apostle Paul identifies Jesus of Nazareth within the Torah, where "the ...


4

James explains the reasoning employed in verse 10 in the immediately following verses: For he who said, "Do not commit adultery," also said, "Do not murder." Now if you do not commit adultery but do commit murder, you have become a violator of the law. (Jas 2:11-12 ESV) James is expressing the Jewish view (shared by Romans) that the law was ...


4

"It is finished" The finished in v.28 "all was now finished", is the same Gr. telein as in v.30. Acc. to R.E. Brown1, this "has the connotation of completion as well as that of simple ending." He adds, "Occasionally it has sacrificial overtones." He also relates this telein to the telos of John 13:1 "he now loved ...


4

Romans 10:19 But I say, did Israel not know? First Moses says: "I will provoke you to jealousy by those who are not a nation, I will move you to anger by a foolish nation." 20 But Isaiah is very bold and says: "I was found by those who did not seek Me; I was made manifest to those who did not ask for Me." 21 But to Israel he says: "All day long I have ...


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