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14

The Hebrew word תֵּבָה (tebah) occurs 28 times in the OT and simply means (literally), chest, box, coffin, etc. That is, a box-like container used to house and protect some contents that are (by definition) precious. See BDB meaning in appendix below. Interestingly, the noun is only ever used to describe just two objects: Noah's ark - the great ship, 26 ...


11

In the original post Gen 11:10 is only partially cited, like this - Gn 11:10 When Shem was 100 years old, he became the father of Arpachshad… although in the OP answer, the rest of the verse is quoted: Gen 11:10 ...Shem was 100 years old, and begat Arpachshad 2 years after the flood. Of course, that end phrase ("two years after the flood") solves one ...


10

Since our goal is to understand what the author of the text meant by what he wrote, it is more helpful to look at how the event is described by the author, in the text than to get hung up on semantic possibilities, ANE discoveries, or personal beliefs. The author clearly meant it to be understood as a global event. In addition to the evidence you already ...


9

These 3 enigmas or problems can only be solved if fatherhood and childhood (life) are calculated from conception forward. Otherwise the math won't work. The 3 problems above require certain information in order to reach 2 key facts. Then the math issues can be resolved. Who entered and who left the ark? How long did the flood last? (How long was Noah on ...


9

It is the generally accepted view in Midrashic literature that God communicated to the Patriarchs which animals were clean (Heb.טָהוֹר) and which were unclean (Heb.טָמֵא) for the purpose of sacrifice. Evidence to support this is that the Patriarchs only sacrificed clean animals before (and after) the time of Noah. For example, in Genesis 4:4 Abel brings a ...


9

According to Genesis, Noah's ark was box shaped. At 300 cubits long (450 feet), 50 cubits wide (75 feet), and 30 cubits high (45 feet), the shape is not round. Genesis 6:15-16 And this is the fashion which thou shalt make it of: The length of the ark shall be three hundred cubits, the breadth of it fifty cubits, and the height of it thirty cubits. A window ...


8

It is clear from the text of Genesis 5 that Enoch was certainly viewed as being different from the other patriarchs. The major differences we can see within the text itself are that Enoch a) died early, and b) died in a manner different than the other patriarchs. The patriarchs listed in Chapter 5 all lived between 777 and 969 years, except for Enoch, who ...


7

Genesis 5:32 does not say that Noah was 500 years old exactly when he had Shem, it says: And Noah was five hundred years old: and Noah begat Shem, Ham, and Japheth. (KJV) with the colon in there it disconnects the births from his age. The five hundred years is there to note when God gave him his marching orders. It shows us in concert with Genesis 7:11 ...


7

The Masoretic vowelization here isn't changing the meaning of the consonantal text. The letter ה as a suffix is used throughout the Bible, though less often than ו, to represent the /o/ that marks masculine possession. Examples: Genesis 12:8 אׇהֳלֹה "his tent" Genesis 49:11 עִירֹה "his donkey" and סוּתֹה "his garment" Exodus 32:17 בְּרֵעֹה "in its ...


6

I believe the better explanation is the common practice of rounding numbers. Shem was ca. 100 years old when the flood began, though his exact age may have been 98. Similarly, David reigned 7 1/2 years over Judah, 33 years over all Israel, and 40 years total (2Sam 5:5): unless one assumes one of these numbers are rounded, one has a serious problem. ...


6

As you noted, the Great Flood story is detailed to even the day. The wording shows us in 3 different ways (making it indisputable) that only Noah, his wife, his 3 sons, and his sons’ wives got into the ark, and only they got out later. That point, some math, and the detail below, lead to one conclusion. A man can’t possibly become a father when his child is ...


6

As noted in other answers, the meaning of גֹּפֶר seems lost to us, and any translation must therefore be speculative. To support the translation "cypress", however, consider the following extract from Beekes/Van Beek, Etymological Dictionary of Greek: κυπάρισσος [f.] 'cypress' (ε 64). <PG(V)> - VAR Att. -ιττος. [...] - ETYM Clearly a Pre-Greek word,...


6

While OP poses his question in these terms... What then is the significance of Noah's name meaning "rest" or "comfort" and how does it relate to the flood narrative? ...I will adjust that slightly and work with this (alterations indicated in square brackets): What then is the [meaning] of Noah's name [...] and [...] does it relate to the flood ...


5

Gen. 7:6 says that Noah was (literally) ‘the son of 600 years’ ( בן שש מאות שנה) when the flood began. This is an idiom in Hebrew, and in other Semitic languages (e.g. Arabic and Syriac) meaning ‘600 years old’, that is: in the year beginning with his 600th birthday. You can compare the Syriac translation (Pšīttā) of John 8:57, which has ܥܕ݂ܰܟ݁ܺܝܠ ܒ݁ܰܪ ...


5

The short answer is…Yes. According to the text in Genesis 5 through Genesis 10, every person living today is a descendant of Shem, Ham, or Japheth. Reading Gen 5:32 through Gen 10:32 reveals that Noah only had three sons (i.e. Shem, Ham, and Japheth). Noah and they were the only males who entered the ark, survived the flood, and exited the ark. Right ...


5

Green's literal, interlinear Hebrew translation of the Masoretic text of Genesis 5:29 gives : This one/shall comfort us/from our work/and the toil of/our hands/from/the ground/ which Jehovah has cursed. The biblehub literal interlinear gives : This shall comfort us from our work and toil of our hands concerning our work of the ground which the Lord ...


5

Is it the case that Noah, his family, and all the animals had but one small window to breathe through (Gen. 6:16)? In the article "Ark" under the heading "Design and Size", the Insight on the Scriptures gives another alternative: “You will make a tsoʹhar [roof; or, window] for the ark,” Noah was told. (Ge 6:16) Just what this was or how ...


4

I have a line of thought on this that leads to a conclusion that Lamech would have had what he considered divine insight into an expectation that his son, Noah, was likely destined to play a role of rescuer in the plans of God. Two of the antediluvian fathers listed in Gen.5 are said to have "walked with God". This is seemingly always taken by commentators ...


4

On the surface, this question sounds unanswerable. What do we know about Lamech? He lived 777 years, dying approximately 5 years before the flood. Methuselah, Lamech's father, died within a year of the flood (as late as in the flood, but this isn't known). Lamech's lifespan was unusually short (118 years shorter than anyone else whose age at death is ...


4

Those same phrases of clean and unclean (in Hebrew, טהור and טמא, Vulgate: mundus and inmundus) appear in Leviticus chapter 11, with lists and guidelines regarding certain animals. For example, "Every animal that parts the hoof but is not cloven-footed or does not chew the cud is unclean" (Lev. 11:26 ESV). The camel, hyrax (or rock badger), hare, and pig are ...


4

God shall enlarge Japheth, and he shall dwell in the tents of Shem; and Canaan shall be his servant. - Genesis 9:27 There is no indication that anything in this verse is mutually exclusive. That is to say: Japheth would do all of these things. We can first establish that the descendants of Japheth were enlarged: ... to them belonged all Europe, and lesser ...


4

There are no other servants in Genesis 9:25. The phrase "servant of servants" is an example of one of several forms of emphasis in OT Hebrew. This type of emphatic form is constructed by doubling a noun or verb root. The intent in Genesis 9:25 is to say, the lowliest of servants, the ultimate OT Hebrew pejorative. Other verses using this emphatic form, ...


3

I must take issue with the idea that "The author clearly meant it to be understood as a global event." This is not even a possibility! The Hebrew author, whomever one wants to say he was, was not aware of a "global" world. This was not even a possible perspective for a person living in the world of that day. There was no knowledge of a "global world" at that ...


3

Noah’s age is not the only detail in the story that gets repeated. In fact many of the points of the story are repeated. The parallels between 7:6 and 7:11 may not be anything specific to Noah’s age. For example, the story repeats: The number of animals taken into the ark (7 clean and 2 unclean in verse 7:2f, then 2 clean and 2 unclean in verse 7:8f) Noah’...


3

In the last 5 verses of Genesis it seems Joseph’s age at death of 110 is given twice. Joseph dies at about 110 That isn’t done for anyone else and made me think the authors might be defining “life” as one thing and “years old" ("age" and "lifetime") as another. Looking at the question above from a math perspective and assuming “life” is a synonym for “...


3

This is not precisely an answer to the question, but it is a requisite concept. (It also didn't fit into a comment well.) Margin of Error When Linking "When X was Y years" Statements When I say "error" here, I'm not referring to errors in the text, only inaccuracies in measuring lengths of time. Linking ages statements together has a necessarily large ...


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