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25

There are three Herods in scripture. 1 The one that killed the infants at the time of Jesus' birth - 'Herod the Great'. 2 The one that killed John the Baptist - 'Herod Antipas'. (Also 'the Tetrarch'.) 3 The one that killed James, the brother of John - 'Herod Agrippa'. (See Young's Analytical Concordance under 'Herod'.) Wikipedia - Herod Antipas agrees ...


21

Here is an extract from Wikipedia about the Herodian family (source): Herod the Great (born c. 74 BC, ruled 37–4 BC), client king of Judea who built the Second Temple (in Jerusalem) and in the New Testament orders the Massacre of the Innocents Herod Archelaus (born 23 BC, ruled 4 BC–AD 6), ethnarch of Samaria, Judea, and Idumea Herod Antipas (born 21 BC, ...


8

What does the word harpagmos mean in Philippians 2:6 In his book "TRUTH IN TRANSLATION Accuracy and Bias in English translations of the New Testament" Jason David BeDuhn an associate professor of religious studies at Northern Arizona University, analyzes the word “harpagmos” in Philippians 2:6. Below are extracts of the chapter. How to translators handle "...


7

It means if there is no afterlife then why bother go through all the opposition, persecution, and trouble of living for God? Why lose friends when we turn to Christ, why give up sinful pleasures? Why give up selfish ambitions if this life is all there is? What would be the point? Why not renounce our faith rather than be thrown to the lions, or covered ...


7

At the time of Exodus 16:27, there was no prescription of punishment for violating the Sabbath except sin offerings. That changed in Exodus 35 1 Moses assembled the whole Israelite community and said to them, “These are the things the Lord has commanded you to do: 2For six days, work is to be done, but the seventh day shall be your holy day, a day of ...


7

The question makes a leap of logic that is unwarranted. In all the cases cited, Ex 17:17, Num 20:2, literal (as distinct from spiritual or figurative) water is in view. This leaves us with 1 Cor 10:3 and John 4:10-14. During the conversation with the woman at Jacob's well, Jesus used the metaphor of water to teach about about divine grace and the gospel of ...


6

From the Introduction to the NIV Exhaustive Concordance [NIVEC], with some interspersed commentary: Advances in biblical scholarship have made it difficult, if not impossible, to use Strong's century-old system. In the first place, Strong's system indexes only the vocabulary of the original-language texts that underlie the KJV. This means some words in ...


5

Both versions use distinct sets of manuscripts for the Old Testament and New Testament. One might say that the NIV uses an "older" Old Testament manuscript on occasion by deferring to the Septuagint or Dead Sea Scrolls (as explained below), but I am not sure this is significant. There are rumors that the King James translators may also have done likewise, ...


5

Water is important to sustain life, in this way, Jesus was saying that He is the way to get everlasting life. He must have noticed the woman's will to learn about the events foretold. Her spiritual thirst was great. Background info: Jews were not common to speak with Samaritans, and to speak to a woman was also frowned upon. Later in the story it says the ...


4

The Greek word ἁρπαγμός is a noun denoting "to grasp at something" (source). This act of grasping can either be active or passive depending on the context.The active sense talks about "a thing to be taken" (res rapienda) while the passive sense talks about "a thing taken" (res rapta). Active To steal something by force (robbery)...


4

Comparing Translations "Which one is the correct one?" One of the challenges in interpreting the scriptures is that we cannot always be 100% confident of what the original authors intended when they wrote down the words in front of us. Longman and Shields have both called this verse "one of the most difficult verses to interpret in Ecclesiastes", so be ...


4

John 5:4 is a verse that is variously included or excluded in various manuscripts upon which the modern edited versions depend. Thus, the question is purely a textual criticism problem. Of the commonly used edited NT texts we have: NA28 & UBS5: omit Jerome's Vulgate (~400 AD): omit SBL: omit W&H: omit Souter: omit NIV GNT: omit THGNT: omit ...


4

The argument is about the difference between will and subsequent action. The Numbers' (15:33) Israelite man had the will to gathering wood, as well as performed the action to gather wood. The Israelite individuals mentioned in Exo 16:27 had only the will, since the circumstances did not allow them to perform the action of gathering manna. So, since the ...


4

If nothing was found on the sabbath, then no work was done in carrying it back to the tents. Therefore, the sabbath was not violated (in any way which could be proved). All that happened was that some people went for a walk on the sabbath. And, having found nothing, they may not have admitted what it was they were actually doing. In which case, again, no ...


4

Uncertain Hebrew Phrase Jewish scholars state the meaning of the phrase נשקו־בר, which the OP states means yearn for purity or kiss the son as in the NIV and others, is uncertain: d pay homage in good faith,d lest He be angered, and your way be doomed in the mere flash of His anger. Happy are all who take refuge in Him (Psalm 2:12 Tanakh 1985) פן־יאנף ...


4

The 'prostitution' referenced by Ezekiel is in most senses a reference to idolatry: "They committed adultery with their idols; they even sacrificed their children, whom they bore to me, as food for them." (Ezekiel 23:27) In a secondary sense, it is also a reference to "lust[ing] after the nations" (Ezekiel 23:30b), which we see ...


4

Let's see the context, NIV John 5: 31“If I testify about myself, my testimony is not true. ... 33“You have sent to John and he has testified to the truth. ... 37And the Father who sent me has himself testified concerning me. ... 39You study the Scriptures diligently because you think that in them you have eternal life. These are the very Scriptures that ...


3

The NIV footnote is simply stating that after the word “me,” “most manuscripts of the Masoretic text” read “like a lion.” The word “me” is actually in all manuscripts, as it is indicated by the pronominal suffix (-ni) at the end of the word הִקִּיפוּנִי (hikkifuni)—“encircle/enclose me,” which all manuscripts have. The actual textual variant is כארו v. כארי, ...


3

It is not exactly hitting hands, but more like clapping the hands, not by the way of happiness Rashi (Rabi Shlomo Yitzhaki): הכיתי כפי. צעקתי ווי וקינה : Rashi says that "strike my hands together" is an expression of lament and grief. (Also these days, this is a common way of showing grief) There are more times which this expression appears in the Bible ...


3

To the choirmaster. A Maskil of David, when Doeg, the Edomite, came and told Saul, “David has come to the house of Ahimelech.” Why do you boast of evil, O mighty man? The steadfast love of God endures all the day. (Psalm 52:1) [ESV] לַמְנַצֵּחַ מַשְׂכִּיל לְדָוִֽד׃ בְּבֹוא דֹּואֵג הָאֲדֹמִי וַיַּגֵּד לְשָׁאוּל וַיֹּאמֶר לֹו בָּא דָוִד אֶל־בֵּית ...


3

The verse is extremely unlikely to be original, and evidently a latter addition, as the NET Bible notes on John 5:3: 9 tc The majority of later mss (C Θ Ψ 078 ƒ M) add the following to 5:3: “waiting for the moving of the water. 5:4 For an angel of the Lord went down and stirred up the water at certain times. Whoever first stepped in after the stirring of ...


3

I have not yet seen any evidence that the active noun harpagmos, the act of seizing/snatching/robbing, can replace the passive noun harpagma, the thing seized/snatched/robbed. The claim seems to be made only by Biblical academics, but not by Classicists. The request made elsewhere in this question has not been answered : precisely WHAT is the evidence for ...


3

The NIV Committee on Bible Translation simply lied and made up the new information they claim settled the matter in a way that supports the creedal formula "eternally co-equal with the Father". It was and is a bald faced falsehood with no basis in reality. The scholarship they appeal to is playing in the fields with the unicorns and leprechauns. Please note ...


3

It might be easier for you to understand the statement if it were put into a more natural modern English word order, such as: We are the most pitied of all people if we have hope in Christ for only this life. I've known many people that talk about Jesus, loving one's fellow man, praising God, having wonderful feelings, etc., without ever really being ...


3

This is a case of ketiv and qere. The ketiv (written text) has לא which is usually a particle of negation: לך אמר לא חיה תחיה Go say, "You will surely not live." The qere (read version) corrects this to its homophone לו which means "to him": לֵ֥ךְ אֱמָר־ל֖וֹ חָיֹ֣ה תִֽחְיֶ֑ה Go say to him, "You will surely live." This isn't ...


3

The logic is that being a Christian implies a difficult life of following the path of Jesus: suffering unjust insults, ingratitude from those whom you have done good, and moreover, not being allowed to avenge them, but on the contrary to empathise with them and praying for them. Furthermore, it implies not sparing one's own life for the fulfilment of ...


3

Because Christians have much misery in this life. As to where the wicked do not. How much more is a Christian to be pitied if he be not counted worthy for the kingdom of God but end up in Hell with the rest of the wicked and hypocrites. At least the wicked would have gotten to live in pleasure for a short season, as to where the hypocritical Christian lived ...


3

Jesus was preparing them for different missions. In Luke 10 we have a group being sent out as emissaries and Jesus would follow. In Luke 22 we have Jesus preparing his disciples for their life-long mission that would begin after His death and resurrection. This is why He told them to carry nothing with them in the first charge and were to proceed with ...


3

In Gen 19:17 we read the angel's (Gen 19:1) final instruction to Lot and his family: As soon as the men had brought them out, one of them said, “Run for your lives! Do not look back, and do not stop anywhere on the plain! Flee to the mountains, or you will be swept away!” Lot's wife did not obey and was tuned into a pillar of salt (V26). By contrast, ...


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