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9

The Douay-Rheims version is a translation of the Vulgate. The Vulgate to Psalms seems to have gone through multiple revisions. I looked through all the versions I could find easily and found these translations of the word in question: Dei caeli, God of heaven (Romanum, Gallicanum, Clementine) Domini, Lord (Hebraica) Omnipotentis, Almighty (Pianum, New ...


8

I don't think it's a mistake in the NASB. The identity of ὁ λόγος ("the word") in 1 John 1:1 is puzzling and may have been intentionally ambiguous. To make matters more complicated, the syntax of vv. 1-3 is complex and odd. The basic sequence is: a string of relative clauses that form the compound object (of a verb not seen until v. 3) (v. 1a); a ...


8

The phrase in question from the Greek is μὴ ὢν αὐτὸς ὑπὸ νόμον = not being myself under the law. The MSS that include this phrase include (dates in brackets): P46(200), 01(350), 02(V), 03(IV), 04(V), 06(VI), 010(IX), 012(IX), 024(VI), 0150(IX), 6(XIII), 33(IX), 104(1087), 256(1100), 263(XIII), 365(XII), 436(1100), 459(1092), 1175(X), 1319(XII), 1573(1200), ...


8

The KJV is translated from the Textus Receptus from the Greek texts of the Computensian Polyglot, from Erasmus, from Beza 1598 and Stephanus 1550. Professor Frederick Scrivener, in 1881, produced a learned text in which, from his extensive knowledge of the manuscripts involved, he compiled a Greek text (which sits beside me as I write) being the actual Greek ...


5

Jacob's blessing on Joseph is full of symbolism. Joseph himself is likened to a fruitful bough of a tree by a spring. The mention of the archers who bitterly attack him and harass him is a figure of speech; it is an oblique reference to how his brothers, who were jealous of Joseph, plotted to have him disposed of. But the 'Mighty One of Jacob'protected ...


5

Exodus 12:44 elaborates the phrase in question as, עֶבֶד אִישׁ מִקְנַת־כָּסֶף (eved ish miknat-kesef), “a slave, a man purchase of money.” Abraham was to circumcise both his own offspring (e.g., Ishmael, Isaac) as well as the slaves that he purchased from foreigners.1 Footnotes 1 cf. Lev. 25:44


4

It is only the men of Shechem and the house of Millo which the text mentions. It is not even a complete tribe. So, therefore, significant though the use of the word 'king' is, the last words in Judges still stand : In those days there was no king in Israel.


4

To "bear upon the knees" is a very Hebrew piece of idiom surrounding the birthing custom of the time. When a child was born, it was placed, usually on the knees (in modern terms we say "lap") of the father and mother. Thus, Rachel was essentially saying that any children born to Bilhah would be placed upon Rachel's knees, thus ...


3

The name "Leah" (לֵאָ֖ה) means 'weary'. - Genesis 29:17 is a Hebrew pun : The eyes of Weary (לֵאָ֖ה) were weak. Genesis 29:17 [MT] "and The eyes of Leah were weak" (וְעֵינֵ֥י לֵאָ֖ה רַכּ֑וֹת) "Eyinei" (עֵינֵ֥י) = Eyes ; "Leah" (לֵאָ֖ה) = Weary ; "Rakhot" (רַכּ֑וֹת) = Weak / Soft. Leah also was "the ...


3

This is so because the text wouldn't make sense without it. Taken literally the text just says: When God gives you bread at night etc." but of course this sentence is incomplete and unreadable as it is unclear what will happen then. So they inserted the words "This will happen when" or "You shall know this when" to complete the sentence. This is not done ...


3

John 5:4 is a verse that is variously included or excluded in various manuscripts upon which the modern edited versions depend. Thus, the question is purely a textual criticism problem. Of the commonly used edited NT texts we have: NA28 & UBS5: omit Jerome's Vulgate (~400 AD): omit SBL: omit W&H: omit Souter: omit NIV GNT: omit THGNT: omit ...


3

To the choirmaster. A Maskil of David, when Doeg, the Edomite, came and told Saul, “David has come to the house of Ahimelech.” Why do you boast of evil, O mighty man? The steadfast love of God endures all the day. (Psalm 52:1) [ESV] לַמְנַצֵּחַ מַשְׂכִּיל לְדָוִֽד׃ בְּבֹוא דֹּואֵג הָאֲדֹמִי וַיַּגֵּד לְשָׁאוּל וַיֹּאמֶר לֹו בָּא דָוִד אֶל־בֵּית ...


3

The original meaning of the word in the 16th century: The word Holocaust is derived from the Greek holokauston, a translation of the Hebrew word ʿolah, meaning a burnt sacrifice offered whole to God. This word was chosen, and gained wide usage, because, in the ultimate manifestation of the Nazi killing program—the extermination camps—the bodies of the ...


3

There is no exegetical warrant necessary here: the meaning "having the same nature" is perfectly in line with ordinary Ancient Greek usage. One of the principal meanings of the noun πάθος is "state" or "condition," and we already find Plato and Aristotle using the word in the slightly more general sense denoting a "property&...


2

There is a difference in how these verses are divided in different editions of the Greek text. The explanation for why this is so, however, is a little convoluted. Probably 1 John 2:13-14 isn't the only case of this kind of discrepancy. "Original" verse divisions Verse divisions of the New Testament were first defined by Archbishop of Canterbury Stephen ...


2

I don't think it is a html question! Genesis is built up by the 'toledot' form. With Gen. 37:2 starts the toledot of Jacob. So, I think Gen 37:1 belongs to the toledot of Esau, Gen. 36. I'm studying the life and significance of Esau in Scripture and I discovered that Gen. 36 tells the history of the natural human (in contrast to the spiritual human). The end ...


2

I think this is less complicated than it appears. Lev 18:7 says - You must not expose the nakedness of your father by having sexual relations with your mother. She is your mother; you must not have sexual relations with her. This text is straight forward. The nakedness of the your father is your mother. However, v8 allows for the possibility that the ...


2

There is a difference in the various textual types at this point. The manuscripts fall into just two types: A: Those that say, "Adulteresses" [Μοιχαλίδες (Moichalides)] include the following (with appox dates in brackets after each MSS) according to UBS5: P100(~300), 01(~350 original hand), 02(V), 03(IV), 33(IX), 81(1044), 1175(X original hand), 1739(X), ...


2

“All things are lawful (permissible) for me, but not all things are profitable (beneficial). All things are lawful for me, but I will not be mastered by anything. Food is for the stomach and the stomach is for food, but God will do away with both of them.” 12-13 This is not an argument for universal license to do as one may please in any category of ...


2

How is food connected to sexually immorality in 1 Corinthians 6:13-18? 1 Corinthians 6:13 NASB 13" Food is for the stomach and the stomach is for food, but God will do away with both [i]of them. Yet the body is not for immorality, but for the Lord, and the Lord is for the body." Paul is contrasting food for the stomach and the body for immorality....


1

The first question is who the subject of וַיִּזְכֹּ֥ר is. It could be G-d, or it could be עַמּ֑וֹ meaning His nation. This is the fundamental difference between the translations presented here. Based on context, עַמּ֑וֹ makes more sense. Now יְמֵֽי־עוֹלָ֖ם means old days. מֹשֶׁ֣ה either means the name Moses here, or the action of bringing out of the water. ...


1

Great Question, Collen! - Grammatically, Neither the NASB or KJV are accurate translations of Yeshayahu (Isaiah) 63:11. "Moshe" (מֹשֶׁה) does not translate to Moses. The Dead Sea Scroll does not have the Masoretic marker "יא" for 11. The prefix "Va" (וַ) means 'And' not 'Then'. Since you cite the Masoretic Tanakh with ...


1

The literal meaning of the verb נָפַל (nafal) is “fall.” However, in Gen. 25:18, it appears to possess a more idiomatic sense. According to the 16th ed. of Gesenius’ lexicon,1 f) sich niederlassen, v. einem Heere, m. בְּ Ri 7 12, v. einem Volke, s. v. a. wohnen, m. עַל־פְּנֵי Gn 25 18 (vgl. 16 12, aber unsicher). f) “to establish oneself/settle,” with בְּ, ...


1

Technically, Gen 17 is what is known as the "Covenant" provisions. The Abrahamic Covenant is stated in two places, Gen 15 & 17, 13 years apart (and repeated in Gen 18:9-15, 22:15-18 without using the word “covenant” nor formal sacrifices) and consisted of the following: Gen 15 God promises Abram a biological son God promises Abram uncountable ...


1

According to the Oxford Jewish Study Bible, the Hebrew of Jeremiah 6:2 is "uncertain", perhaps due to some ambiguity on how the original Hebrew text might have been vocalized to create the Masoretic equivalent (someone schooled in Hebrew can comment). The underlying Jewish translation upon which the OJSB is based renders the verse similar to what ...


1

They are not in the earliest manuscripts, but may have been repeated from 1 Cor. 10:26 for emphasis. "and if any one may say to you, `This is a thing sacrificed to an idol,' -- do not eat, because of that one who shewed [it], and of the conscience, for the Lord's [is] the earth and its fulness:" (1 Cor. 10:28, YLT) "...for the Lord's [is] ...


1

2 Chronicles 32:24-26 (NRSV) Hezekiah was not rebuked for seeking a sign, because he humble himself for the haughtiness of his heart. 24 "In those days Hezekiah became sick and was at the point of death. He prayed to the Lord, and he answered him and gave him a sign. 25 But Hezekiah did not respond according to the benefit done to him, for his ...


1

Abilimek becomes King in Judges 9:4 rules over Isreal 3 years (9:22) and dies in Judges 9:54. By the time we get to Judges 21 many years have passed and there is no King in Isreal in those days.


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