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In his commentary of Exodus, Dennis Prager makes this statement about Exodus 3:14: ...God identifies Himself with a name having four possible meanings, each one perfectly accurate. "I am what I am"; "I am who I am"; "I will be what I will be"; "I will be who I will be"; The reason all four translations are accurate is ...


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Some would argue that English has no real future tense, only the statement of a 'willingness' for the future. Such is Biblical Hebrew. Earlier forms of the Hebrew language did not have strictly defined past, present, or future tenses ... Wikipedia - Modern Hebrew Verbs And some would argue that the true translation is 'I be who I be', which is a statement ...


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Probably the best translation is "I will be whom I will be." However, this still does not give the full implications of the continuous action of the imperfect tense as used here. It isn't limited to time as are English tenses. See Doesn’t Moses hypothetical response of the Israelites in (4:1) answer his proposed question in (3:13), then “I AM” is ...


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My answer was taken from "I AM" - Part 3 with redactions to some portions of it. Let us examine Exodus 3:14. Those Bible translators who follow the King James tradition translate Ex. 3:13-15 like this: "(:13) And Moses said unto God, Behold, when I come unto the children of Israel, and shall say unto them, The God of your fathers hath sent me ...


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With due respect to the alleged complexity in Ex. 03:14 I still believe the answer is simple. The phrase literally means "I WILL BE WHAT I WILL BE" because it is the future conjugation. To those who prefer the imperfect future, the phrase literally means "I WILL COMPLETE WHAT I WILL COMPLETE" To understand this phrase or any phrase ...


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The answer to this question about the "correct" translation of "ehyeh asher ehyeh" in Ex 3:14 is much debated. Most translations make a valiant attempt but it is impossible to fully render the meaning of the Hebrew. Before proceeding further, let me remind ourselves of a few facts: Hebrew verbs do not have temporal tense in the same way ...


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While I firmly believe that the Holy Spirit is an integral and eternal member of the Godhead, this comparison of these two texts cannot be used as evidence for that conclusion. Let me elaborate. In Heb 3:7, 8 has Therefore, as the Holy Spirit says: “Today, if you hear His voice, do not harden your hearts ... In Ps 95:6-8 has O come, let us worship and ...


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When one worships God your worshipping the Son and the Holy Spirit since there is only one God. The Holy Spirit is a person in relation to the Father and the Son. The Holy Spirit is God in relation to us. If your in a relationship with the Father/Son/Holy Spirit, then you must be in a relationship with them all; for there is only one God. If you deny one, ...


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Many early manuscripts, and so translations like KJV and NIV, have it so the "which you have given me" is referring to those whom he has given, not the name.


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Best start with the Shema, which the apostle Paul would have understood inside out and back to front. Regarding Deuteronomy 6:4, this commentary notes: "In Heb. shem'ayisrael y'hovah'eloheynuy'hovah echad = "Hear , O Israel, Jehovah [the Self and ever existing One), our Elohim, is one Jehovah." one. Heb. 'ehad - a compound unity (Latin unus),...


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Let us take the three verses referenced Gen 17:1 - The LXX simply has Ἐγώ εἰμι ὁ θεός σου = "I am your God". That is, "El-Shaddai" is not mentioned. Gen 35:11 - The LXX simply has ἐγὼ ὁ Θεός σου = "I am your God". That is, "El-Shaddai" is not mentioned. Ex 6:3 - The LXX simply has Θεὸς ὢν αὐτῶν = "being their ...


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It seems highly coincidental that יהוה (YHWH) means "he will be," while the Egyptian god Khepri has the same meaning. That is, since King Hezekiah made a strategic political alliance with Egypt around the same time that the tetragrammaton became popular and when winged scarabs and winged suns begin to be employed in Judean royal imagery (approx. ...


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The question forces an answer that יה must be a contraction יהוה. Perhaps it is not. In forty eight times יה is used in scripture, It appears twice with יהוה as יה יהוה . Isa 12:2 and Isa 26:4. And it is translate LORD JEHOVAH. In extra-biblical writings It is also used. If it was a 'nickname' for Jehovah, as is suggested by the contraction theory, what ...


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