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20

Short Answer: Many have come up with various numerological interpretations of the number 153 in John. I believe this to be reading into the text things not intended by the author. As the two previous answers to this questions illustrate well, this numerological method allows for several different interpretations of the same passage. Each of the words in the ...


14

While some have argued for some kind of symbolism in the number shown here, there is no direct support from the text. The notes from the Net Bible indicate the following direct implications: This may have been a larger-than-average catch (especially in context of the following phrase - the net didn't tear under the load) This may be indicative of blessing ...


11

The short answer is that, no, despite a persistent urban legend that NASA modeled this on one of their early computer systems, the reality is that such a simulation is impossible. According to Dr. Danny Faulkner writing for Answers in Genesis From time to time, one hears that NASA computers have proved the account of the unusual day that accompanied the ...


6

The setting here is long before the invention of the printing press. The scriptures were hand copied, thus ordinary people would not have been able to own a copy of the scriptures. However, in ancient Judea during the Second Temple Period, the Jewish scriptures(Christian Old Testament) would have been publicly available in the synagogues to read. In fact, ...


5

There are only two possibilities: Jesus healed him, but the healing didn't 'take. Jesus did not heal him. 1 is improbable, so what are the reasons that Jesus wouldn't have healed him? a. They didn't cross paths. Though possible is not probable. b. They crossed paths but Jesus chose not to heal him. This occurs other places: Mt 13.58 And he did not ...


4

As far as I can find out, this is the only time "153" appears in the Bible. I searched through some of the apocryphal books too. Here's Wikipedia's page on the biblical number 153. I don't really care for all the square-root-of-the-triangular-circle-number woowoo stuff, but the fact that It has also been noted that the Tetragrammaton occurs 153 times ...


4

This is purely conjecture, as the text doesn't clearly state, however, we see in the text: "Then he gave them to the disciples, and the disciples gave them to the people", and being that there were 12 disciples, each one was likely to have had bread to spread to the peoples. There may have been a larger bounty, but each disciple could carry only one basket, ...


4

This is not possible, unless (in the first feast, feeding the five thousand) the disciples made a foolish assumption: Mark 6:36: Send them away, that they may go into the country round about, and into the villages, and buy themselves bread: for they have nothing to eat. From that verse, we ought to assume the crowd really did have nothing to eat. Even ...


3

The background to this event is interesting The woman is described as a wealthy married woman in the village of Shunem. She had no child. This woman got permission from her husband to set up a guest room for Elisha, acknowledging Elisha as a true prophet and holy man of God. Elisha often passed that way in his travels, and he stayed in the guest room. ...


3

There are a variety of reasons why each gospel author may have chosen to implement what has come to be called the "messianic secret" (Messiasgeheimnis) theme (based on Wrede's watershed work).1 Most scholarly discussion of this theme is related to the gospel of Mark, which the author of the gospel ascribed to Matthew likely used as a source. Even so, the ...


3

Intro As noted by the OP, there are a number of these passage in the Gospel accounts. Collectively, this phenomenon is know as the "Messianic Secret" in academic literature. A number of explanations have been offered for the secrecy passages ranging from Jesus actually said such things for some reason (to teach the 12, to delay his death, to avoid Jewish ...


2

The staff was a symbol of authority. Moses lifted his up and the great water parted, Moses hit the rock with it and water gushed out of an actual rock. The prophet's staff was a symbol of the authority of God that was with him and working through him. Elisha sending his staff, was like Elisha sending himself to be there. (similar to Paul sending cloths ...


2

In Matthew's Gospel, Jesus twice tells his opponents that there will be no sign except that of Jonas (Jonah), using very similar words in each case: Matthew 12:38-40: Then certain of the scribes and of the Pharisees answered, saying, Master, we would see a sign from thee. But he answered and said unto them, An evil and adulterous generation seeketh after ...


2

In the Gospel narratives, Jesus never performed signs simply for the sake of performing signs. He never acceded to a request "I would see a sign from you." All the miracles attributed to him were either to fulfill a need that he saw, or to demonstrate the power of God. Even the miracle at the Wedding of Cana was done to help the bride and groom, who would ...


2

John 12:23-28 (DRB) But Jesus answered them, saying: The hour is come, that the Son of man should be glorified. 24 Amen, amen I say to you, unless the grain of wheat falling into the ground die, 25 Itself remaineth alone. But if it die, it bringeth forth much fruit. He that loveth his life shall lose it; and he that hateth his life in this world, ...


2

I see it as grief induced. She had prayed for a son and been granted one, only to lose him. She may have felt that she would have preferred never to have had her child than to have had him and watch him die.


1

At the time of Christ, Judaism was a religio licita (permitted religion); as such there were legal concessions made to the Jewish people. For example, "Jews might gather freely in thiasoi, observe the Sabbath and the Jewish festivals, send money to the Temple in Jerusalem, and enjoy autonomy in their communal affairs. Jews were also absolved from compulsory ...


1

I think if we interpret My hour to mean not simply the time for Jesus to do miracles, but rather the time for Him to reveal His power, there is not so great a contradiction. There is nothing in the passage that shows the wedding guests actually realized that a miracle took place. The ruler of the feast complements the bridegroom on the quality of the wine (...


1

Your answer is in the next verse. Mark 6.6 says that he marvelled at their unbelief. Whenever Jesus healed someone, we hear him say" your faith has made you well". The healing anointing of Jesus was released when those people had faith. To be accurate, their faith became a sort of receptor device,through which they received their healing. People in this ...


1

If we ignore the casting out of demons, the first miracle, or 'sign, mentioned in Mark's Gospel as performed by Jesus was actually when he cured Simon's mother, and then he performed many miraculous cures and exorcisms: Mark 1:30-34: But Simon's wife's mother lay sick of a fever, and anon they tell him of her. And he came and took her by the hand, and ...


1

It would seem from the passage in question that calling on the name of Jesus is all that is needed in order to perform great miracles. According to Matthew, the 'false prophets' were able to perform miracles (variously translated as 'wonderful works' or 'deeds of power') and exorcise demons merely by calling on the name of Jesus, even though they were not ...


1

Being a Hebrew speaker I’d say that there’s a difference between “miracles” and “signs”. Miracles are acts of the supernatural intervening in the natural. Signs are indicative acts that proof one’s legitimacy and confirmation of a message. Isaiah told Ahaz, who did not want to test God: “Moreover the Lord spoke again to Ahaz, saying, “Ask a sign for ...


1

John chapter 9 is, in its entirety, a commentary on the claim Jesus makes in John 8:12: John 8:12: Then spake Jesus again unto them, saying, I am the light of the world: he that followeth me shall not walk in darkness, but shall have the light of life. The story of the blind man should therefore be read in the context of chapter 9 as a whole. Chapter 9 ...


1

It is impossible to answer this question beyond giving a baseless opinion. We have exactly what is in the text and nothing more. Even if we had a tradition to refer to in this matter, it would be nothing more than that - a tradition - and really have no more weight than the opinion of anyone here, because of a lack of information from the text. One thing ...


1

I tend to agree that the man was born without eyes. Aside from the thoughts mentioned above, the fact that he was born blind was apparent from looking at him, and, after he was healed, people had a difficult time recognizing him, implying that his appearance had changed.


1

The gospel of Matthew has a lot of interesting things to say about bread. Its first mention is when the devil tempts Jesus in Matthew 4, commanding the stones to become bread. Jesus refuses to do a bread miracle to satiate his own hunger, despite the fact that he will ultimately feed at least 9,000 men with miraculous bread. Jesus' rebuke of the devil says ...


1

This encounter was specifically sat up to restore Peter. He was initially called to follow Jesus after the Lord borrowed his boat. Sowing into Christ's ministry in this way yielded the remarkable catch of fish. After which Peter, James and John forsook their nets and followed Him. This encounter is the same: a calling to once again return to His work. But ...


1

The Scene John didn't miss the significance of the miracle. A mysterious man on the shore had told them where to cast their net, and the catch was amazing. John knew, it was the Lord standing there on the shore! This was clearly an emotional moment -- especially for Peter, who immediately cast himself into the sea in order to get to Him quicker, even ...


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