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In the MT there is a closed parsha break between the verses that are numbered in Christian editions as Micah 5:1 and 5:2. The Jews adopted the Christian chapter breaks in the printed editions of the MT except when the Christian chapter breaks split a parsha within three verses of the beginning or end of a parsha, in which case the printed MT editions move ...


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The LXX reads thus: Micah 2:12-13 (LXX) συναγόμενος συναχθήσεται Ιακωβ σὺν πᾶσιν ἐκδεχόμενος ἐκδέξομαι τοὺς καταλοίπους τοῦ Ισραηλ ἐπὶ τὸ αὐτὸ θήσομαι τὴν ἀποστροφὴν αὐτῶν ὡς πρόβατα ἐν θλίψει ὡς ποίμνιον ἐν μέσῳ κοίτης αὐτῶν ἐξαλοῦνται ἐξ ἀνθρώπων · διὰ τῆς διακοπῆς πρὸ προσώπου αὐτῶν διέκοψαν καὶ διῆλθον πύλην καὶ ἐξῆλθον δ αὐτῆς καὶ ἐξῆλθεν ὁ βασιλεὺς ...


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No mention of the birth of Messiah in the north in Isaiah 9:6 Isaiah is prophesying to Judah (Isaiah 1:1, NKJV): The vision of Isaiah the son of Amoz, which he saw concerning Judah and Jerusalem in the days of Uzziah, Jotham, Ahaz, and Hezekiah, kings of Judah And though he mentions aspects of the Northern Kingdom, his prophecy is directed to the ...


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In my view the question has to be answered by separate reference to historical exegesis and Christian belief. Isaiah mentions Zebulun in Isaiah 9:1 as having been humbled, meaning that the Assyrians had conquered the district, but (as we know) not yet the Israelite capital of Samaria. At the same time Isaiah expresses the hope that in the future Zebulun ...


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To understand the verse in question it helps to understand the military context: ESV Micah 5: 1a Now muster your troops, O daughterb of troops; siege is laid against us; with a rod they strike the judge of Israel on the cheek. 2c But you, O Bethlehem Ephrathah, who are too little [insignificant] to be among the clans [armies] of Judah, ...


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Jonah was commanded by God to go to Nineveh. 1:1 The word of the Lord came to Jonah son of Amittai: 2“Go to the great city of Nineveh and preach against it, because its wickedness has come up before me.” ... 3:6 When Jonah’s warning reached the king of Nineveh, he rose from his throne, took off his royal robes, covered himself with sackcloth and sat down in ...


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The operative word in Micah 5:2 is יָצָא (yatsa) means "to go or come out" (see BDB). Therefore, both are correct. The word occurs over 1000 times in the OT and is variously translated as: Brought forth, Gen 1:12, 24, 2:10, 15:17, etc Go out, Gen 4:16, 8:7, 16, 18, 19, 12:5, etc Come from, Gen 10:14, 15:4, etc If one wanted to translate יָצָא (...


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In the LORD’s covenant with Abraham he makes this amazing prophetic promise: [Gen 28:14 NLT] (14) Your descendants will be as numerous as the dust of the earth! They will spread in all directions--to the west and the east, to the north and the south. And all the families of the earth will be blessed through you and your descendants. That is, the “going” of ...


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Brown-Driver-Briggs is right to suggest "inside," but I think my translations for בְּקֶ֙רֶב֙ (bə·qe·reḇ) would be 'within', then 'among', and sometimes 'through' depending on the situation. In most cases, I would use 'within' The ESV is not always consistent in how it translates בְּקֶ֙רֶב֙ (bə·qe·reḇ). Gen 45:6 - "in" Num 5:27 - "among" Joshua 1:11 - "...


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Autodidact asked: ‘What are ‘the days of eternity’ (yom olam) in Micah [5:1 (BHS)] asserting about the ruler?’ One We’ve understand better the meaning of the term עלם/עולם (OLM/OULM [two variants commonly used in TaNaKh]) translated ‘eternity’ by NASB, along with a number of translations. First of all, the basic meaning of עלם (OLM) is not ‘to be eternal’,...


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What scripture is being reference to in this passage? MATTHEW 2 3 When Herod the king had heard these things, he was troubled, and all Jerusalem with him. 4 And when he had gathered all the chief priests and scribes of the people together, he demanded of them where Christ should be born. 5 And they said unto him, In Bethlehem of Judaea: for thus it is ...


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As far as I know, a הַפֹּרֵיץ wasn’t a profession/military title. However, it is probable that someone who barge in something was called הַפֹּרֵיץ. One thing does not rule out the other. Yet, in the TaNaKh (Hebrew Bible), פרץ was also a proper name. We found a typical example of this usage in Gen 38:29 when Tamar said to his newborn baby מה־פרצת עליך פרץ “...


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Naturally expositors have various conjectures and the opinions are many. The main theories seem to be these: A quotation from Mica in the margin of Isaiah accidentally transferred into the main text Both quote another prophecy Both independently receive the same inspired prophecy Either one quotes the other This debate goes way back and Joseph Alexander ...


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