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First, "Moses and the prophets", or sometimes, "the Law of Moses and the prophets", is a common hendiadys meaning what we now call the OT Hebrew scriptures. John 1:45, Luke 16:29, 31, 24:44, Acts 13:15, 26:22, 28:23, Rom 3:21, etc. There are many examples of where the NT writers quoted the OT to show that Jesus fulfilled OT prophecies ...


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We could render Paul's statement to mean: Moses said all these things & the prophets said all these things OR Between Moses & the prophets all these things were said The former cannot be unambiguously reconstructed based on the Old Testament; the best we can do there is acknowledge that there are multiple instances in the New Testament where a ...


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A significant difference is numerical. In Matthew, Jesus speaks of the Scriptures, plural, which must be fulfilled, plural. In John He speaks of Scripture, singular, which must be fulfilled, singular. 52 Then Jesus said to him, “Put your sword back into its place. For all who take the sword will perish by the sword. 53 Do you think that I cannot appeal to ...


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Revelation 6: 12 And I beheld when he had opened the sixth seal, and, lo, there was a great earthquake; ... 15And the kings of the earth, and the great men, and the rich men, and the chief captains, and the mighty men, and every bondman, and every free man, hid themselves in the dens and in the rocks of the mountains; Revelation 8: 1 And when he had ...


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Zechariah’s vision: one or two donkeys? Answer: There were two donkeys, and for good reason. First, we might recognize that all four Gospels refer to this event, that of Christ's Triumphal Entry into Jerusalem. Three of the gospels agree that Jesus rode on the colt. So, why does the Gospel of Matthew mention two?: Matthew 21:5: “Say to the daughter of Zion, ...


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It's interesting how much depends upon a single conjunction. In both the Hebrew & Greek texts of Zechariah, "donkey" (or a generic beast of burden) is mentioned twice. What is less clear is whether the conjunction implies an extra donkey. The Hebrew gives us: a donkey "wə-‘al-" a colt... The Greek: a beast of burdern "kai" a ...


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What is the meaning of "fulfill" in John 17:12 and Matthew 26:54 ? Firstly, the Q. here, should really have been with regard to "might be fulfilled/should be fulfilled" respectively, rather than just "fulfill". The mere word "fulfill" is not part of either of these bible verses in question and therefore is not seen to ...


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By fulfill, the passages clearly mean the fulfillment of the prophecies and the Mission of Jesus. The question basically asks about whether Jesus could fail his mission and fall into sin; and the problem of predestination with freewill. Note, that Jesus was not praying that Judas should betray, to fulfill the predictions, or he did not plan his betrayal to ...


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Is John writing about the same event or two separate events? Answer: These are two entirely separate events. Revelation 6:15-16: "Then the kings of the earth and the great men and the commanders and the rich and the strong and every slave and free man hid themselves in the caves and among the rocks of the mountains; and they said to the mountains and ...


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Zechariah - Two Donkeys Rejoice greatly, Fair Zion; raise a shout, Fair Jerusalem! Lo, your king is coming to you. He is victorious, triumphant, yet humble, riding on an ass, on a donkey foaled by a she-ass. (Zechariah 9:9 JPS) גילי מאד בת־ציון הריעי בת ירושלם הנה מלכך יבוא לך צדיק ונושע הוא עני ורכב על־חמור ועל־עיר בן־אתנות Of this passage Ehud Ben Zvi ...


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Is. 11 is mostly interpreteted as a reference to Messiah, but the dividing line is whether it refers to a far future material reign (e.g. an actual kingdom on earth) or a present spiritual reign (e.g. Christ triumphing on the cross and bringing the Kingdom of Heaven into the Earth to exist as his Church). This dividing line is shared by both lay and ...


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How would a Samaritan woman know the Messiah might soon arrive (Jn. 4:25)? Their acceptance of the Pentateuch, by and large, gave the Samaritans the basis for believing that a prophet greater than Moses would come. Deuteronomy 18:18-19 NASB 18 I will raise up for them a prophet from among their countrymen like you, and I will put My words in his mouth, and ...


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The Samaritans lived in what has been thought as the Northern Kingdom of Israel.The kingdoms capital was called Samaria, and was placed between Galilee to the north and Judea to the south. They affirmed only the first five books of the Bible as canonical, considered their temple as Mount Gerizim rather than Mount Zion in Jerusalem (John 4:20). The Samaritans ...


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I know that Messiah is coming (he who is called Christ). When he comes, he will tell us all things.” (John 4:25, ESV) This doesn't necessarily mean she knew the Messiah would soon arrive. In fact, the Samaritans only had the Torah, not the rest of the Tanakh. They looked for the prophet Moses predicted, but not the Jewish Messiah as a descendent of David. ...


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There is no suggestion in John 4:25 that Messiah's advent was soon. The only sense is that Messiah is "coming" at some indefinite time in the future. This was presumably based in the well-known Messianic prophecy in Gen 3:15 - And I will put enmity between you and the woman, and between your seed and her seed. He will crush your head, and you ...


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Isaiah pronounced oracles on many nations. He was aware of how international and global his prophecies were. He was talking about the rise of fall of nations. These oracles would take many years to be completely fulfilled. In particular, Isaiah 40: 3 A voice of one calling: “In the wilderness prepare the way for the Lord; make straight in the desert a ...


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There are theological arguments for rendering this as a reference to the present day, or to the interval between the resurrection of Jesus & the destruction of Jerusalem by Titus, and so on. But from a strictly theologically neutral standpoint, Isaiah does not indicate how much time will pass, rather, he points out signs by which the fulfilment of the ...


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This question is a thorny issue with many for two reasons: Isaiah's prophecy might have been fulfilled IF Israel had been faithful. Unfortunately, Israel was not and rejected Messiah when He came by (among other things) saying, "Take him away! Take him away! Crucify him!" "Shall I crucify your king?" Pilate asked. "We have no king ...


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When I tried the title of my question, I must have missed two questions (with relative answers) that were quite close to mine: Two donkeys upon which the messenger of the covenant rides (asked 4 years ago) How many animals is the King of Zion to ride according to Zechariah? (asked 8 years ago) I am not sure whether @RevelationLad got it right, or simply ...


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New International Version Zechariah 9: 9 Rejoice greatly, Daughter Zion! Shout, Daughter Jerusalem! See, your king comes to you, righteous and victorious, lowly and riding on a donkey [H2543 male donkey], on a colt [H5895 young donkey], the foal of a donkey [H860 female donkey]. There are two animals mentioned in this verse: colt-donkey and mother-donkey. ...


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The Jew's question clearly indicates that the Messiah and Son of God are interchangeable titles to them. They [implicitly] taught & knew that the Messiah was divine and understood the meaning of claims like [the] Son of God, coming in the clouds in the divine power and glory. The reason they rejected him because he was a meek and lowly, ordinary man, ...


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Definition: Fulfil - Strong's Gr 4137 "pleroo" means to make full, to complete. The NASB translation uses it for "accomplish (1), accomplished (1), amply supplied (1), approaching (1), complete (1), completed (3), completing (1), elapsed (1), fill (3), filled (16), fills (1), finished (1), fulfill (20), fulfilled (20), fully carry (1), fully ...


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