11

In the original post Gen 11:10 is only partially cited, like this - Gn 11:10 When Shem was 100 years old, he became the father of Arpachshad… although in the OP answer, the rest of the verse is quoted: Gen 11:10 ...Shem was 100 years old, and begat Arpachshad 2 years after the flood. Of course, that end phrase ("two years after the flood") solves one ...


9

These 3 enigmas or problems can only be solved if fatherhood and childhood (life) are calculated from conception forward. Otherwise the math won't work. The 3 problems above require certain information in order to reach 2 key facts. Then the math issues can be resolved. Who entered and who left the ark? How long did the flood last? (How long was Noah on ...


9

Gen 22:17 That in blessing I will bless thee, and in multiplying I will multiply thy seed as the stars of the heaven, and as the sand which is upon the sea shore; God promised Abraham that his descendants would be as the sand of the sea, and as the stars of heaven. These two metaphors are in direct apposition to each other, and explain each other. The ...


7

The consonantal text of Genesis 1:1 as quoted by OP is the only ancient Hebrew text known for this verse: בראשית ברא אלהים את השמים ואת הארץ brʾšyt brʾ ʾlhym ʾt hšmym wʾt hʾrṣ The oldest known manuscript of this famous text is from the Dead Sea Scrolls, 4Q7 = 4QGeng. Unfortunately it is a broken text, but there is sufficient visible (for the purposes ...


7

Genesis 5:32 does not say that Noah was 500 years old exactly when he had Shem, it says: And Noah was five hundred years old: and Noah begat Shem, Ham, and Japheth. (KJV) with the colon in there it disconnects the births from his age. The five hundred years is there to note when God gave him his marching orders. It shows us in concert with Genesis 7:11 ...


6

I believe the better explanation is the common practice of rounding numbers. Shem was ca. 100 years old when the flood began, though his exact age may have been 98. Similarly, David reigned 7 1/2 years over Judah, 33 years over all Israel, and 40 years total (2Sam 5:5): unless one assumes one of these numbers are rounded, one has a serious problem. ...


5

Gen. 7:6 says that Noah was (literally) ‘the son of 600 years’ ( בן שש מאות שנה) when the flood began. This is an idiom in Hebrew, and in other Semitic languages (e.g. Arabic and Syriac) meaning ‘600 years old’, that is: in the year beginning with his 600th birthday. You can compare the Syriac translation (Pšīttā) of John 8:57, which has ܥܕ݂ܰܟ݁ܺܝܠ ܒ݁ܰܪ ...


5

Although Niobius' answer is good, it misses a bit of the point. G-d gives a childless Avram two metaphors to understand (a) that he would have a lot of progeny, and (b) that they had both tremendous potential to achieve great heights and also to suffer great lows. First, let me give you a fascinating look into how the Jewish Midrashic tales from the Torah ...


5

Let us take a look at all the measures (of time, length, surface, and volume) involved in 1 Kings 6-7, describing the construction of Solomon's Temple : 1 Kings 6:1  In the four hundred and eightieth1 year after (the Exodus), in the fourth year of Solomon, in the second month. 1 The Septuagint has four hundred and fortieth. 1 Kings 6:2  The length ...


3

Noah’s age is not the only detail in the story that gets repeated. In fact many of the points of the story are repeated. The parallels between 7:6 and 7:11 may not be anything specific to Noah’s age. For example, the story repeats: The number of animals taken into the ark (7 clean and 2 unclean in verse 7:2f, then 2 clean and 2 unclean in verse 7:8f) Noah’...


3

This is not precisely an answer to the question, but it is a requisite concept. (It also didn't fit into a comment well.) Margin of Error When Linking "When X was Y years" Statements When I say "error" here, I'm not referring to errors in the text, only inaccuracies in measuring lengths of time. Linking ages statements together has a necessarily large ...


3

In the last 5 verses of Genesis it seems Joseph’s age at death of 110 is given twice. Joseph dies at about 110 That isn’t done for anyone else and made me think the authors might be defining “life” as one thing and “years old" ("age" and "lifetime") as another. Looking at the question above from a math perspective and assuming “life” is a synonym for “...


3

Context is critical to understand this. All the following is quoted from Young's Literal Translation. What started Daniel's conversation with Gabriel? Daniel 9:1 In the first year of Darius, son of Ahasuerus, of the seed of the Medes, who hath been made king over the kingdom of the Chaldeans, in the first year of his reign, I, Daniel, have understood by ...


2

If you look at the exact wording it is all very simple. Gen 5:32 says that Noah begat Shem, Ham and Japheth at the age of 500 years (Hebrew: “the son of 500 years“). If he begat three sons in the same year he must have had at least two wives at that time, but let us leave that out of consideration. Let us assume that Noah was born on the first day of the ...


2

How are we expected to "calculate the number"? As someone has already noted, the dictionary meaning of ψηφίζω (psēphizō) is to count or add up. The word is related to the noun ψῆφος (psēphos), meaning pebble - a device commonly used for counting things. In this sense, psēphizō literally meant something like "to pebble" - though this form doesn't ...


2

The Septuagint version of 1 Kings gets it right with a diameter of 10 cubits (interior diameter) and a circumference of 33 cubits (exterior circumference). Divide 33 by 3 1/7 and you get exactly 10 1/2 cubits for the exterior diameter.


1

Genesis 7:6 And Noah was six hundred years old when the flood of waters was upon the earth. I don't know if anyone can prove the 2-year aspect or not. He could not have had three boys simultaneously. However Shem was the first-born... so it is reasonable to infer he was born (i.e. within 9 months) in Noah's 500th year. Thus Shem certainly could have ...


1

The obvious answer is that the bible is correct. The number to use in physics and engineering calculations depends on how much precision you need. For very rough calculations, it is common to use a fermi approximation, where: π = 1 When making an "in your head" calculations approximation in Physics, one will use: π = 3 And when using a calculator ...


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