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10

To me there is a far simpler and more likely explanation than errors or scribal slips. Especially considering cases like Matthew 27:61, which is surely no slip of the pen: Μαριὰμ ἡ Μαγδαληνὴ and the other Μαρία were sitting there opposite the tomb. Note that the author uses the phrase "and the other...", confirming that as far as they were concerned ...


4

I don't see any particular explanation of the significance given in scripture but I can imagine one reason this might have been mentioned. Luke may have included Mary as one of his eye witness accounts and by mentioning that she memorized what the shepherds told her and what Jesus said to her might lend some credibility. This might have been important since ...


4

Lk 1:57, where Elizabeth gives birth, comes after Lk 1:56, where Mary leaves. Though this in itself is not conclusive evidence that Mary left before John was born, it is an indication. Furthermore, Lk 1:58-36 talk about how Elizabeth's neighbors reacted, and how her relatives who had just heard the good news reacted, and how Zachariah reacted - there is ...


4

There are numerous places where Mary is explicitly called the Mother of Jesus such as: Matt 1:16 - and Jacob the father of Joseph, the husband of Mary, of whom was born Jesus, who is called Christ. Matt 1:18 - This is how the birth of Jesus Christ came about: His mother Mary was pledged in marriage to Joseph, but before they came together, she was found to ...


3

About a quarter of all contemporary Jewish women bore the name "Mary" or a derivative (מרים, מרימא, מריה). To quote the statistics from Tal Ilan ("Notes on the Distribution of Women’s Names in Palestine in the Second Temple and Mishnaic Period," Journal of Jewish Studies 40 (1989) 186-200, online here), 58 out of 145 attested women (23.5%) were named Mary, ...


3

The fact that the neuter is employed τὸ γεννώμενον ἅγιον indicates that the phrase is referring to the quality of being born holy and not the individual that is being born that way (see, e.g., Blass et al., A Greek Grammar of the New Testament and Other Early Christian Literature, §138(1)). A couple of similar examples: John 3:6 (1900 KJV) ...


3

What is the etymology of the name of Mary? As a known and sure fact, we are unsure for there exists several interpretations in this matter. We are not even sure that in is of Hebrew origin. It may in fact be of Egyptian origin. Apparently there are nearly seventy (70) ways to interpretation the name of Mary. Mary is a word of unknown origin. To make a ...


3

These are Hebrew lunar months in the Bible, not solar months. Chinese proverbs count pregnancy period as 10 months. 30 days/month * 9 = 270 days 28 days/month *10 = 280 days Modern statistics says full term pregnancy is 280 days. Luke 1:36 Even Elizabeth your relative is going to have a child in her old age, and she who was said to be unable to conceive is ...


3

The Mary's There appear to be between 6 and 8 women in the New Testament named Mary (please call out any I've missed!): Mary the mother of Jesus, wife of Joseph, from Nazareth (e.g. Luke 1:26-27) Mary Magdalene, (probably) the first witness of the resurrection, from Magdala (e.g. Luke 8:2-3) Mary of Bethany, sister of Martha & Lazarus (e.g. John 11:1-...


3

John refers to Jesus' mother in the crucifixion scene. In John 19:26 Jesus speaks to His mother and refers to her as a woman - I think it it quite safe to say that the "mother of Jesus" in John's Gospel is Mary, the wife of Joseph. If this were ambiguous using only John's Gospel as a source, the ambiguity can be removed by comparing to the ...


3

Doesn't your premise lead to an absurd conclusion in this passage. but standing by the cross of Jesus were his mother and his mother’s sister, Mary the wife of Clopas, and Mary Magdalene. 26 When Jesus saw his mother and the disciple whom he loved standing nearby, he said to his mother, “Woman, behold, your son!” 27 Then he said to the disciple, “Behold, ...


2

Humility is a key difference between Mary's response and Zechariah’s response to Gabriel. Where Mary expressed humility Zechariah expressed doubt. In Luke 1:29 (NLT), it describes Mary as "confused and disturbed" in her response to Gabriel's greeting in verse 28, "Greetings, favored woman! The Lord is with you!" Her feeling of being confused and disturbed ...


2

Wikis, There are generally 3 views held for this question: Jesus spoke to Mary, acting, as it were, as the High Priest fulfilling the Day of Atonement (Lev. 16). Having accomplished the sacrifice, He was on His way to present the blood in heaven (after being in the heart of the earth 3 days), and, between the meeting with Mary in the garden and the ...


2

According to Lev 15:19-24, staying until the birth would have made Mary unclean, as she would likely be involved in the birth to some degree. Adhering to Scripture, as stated, it is inclusive. But Mary, being a humble, obedient servant, likely would do whatever she could to remain clean according to the law.


2

She left in order to remain ritually clean so as not to come in contact with blood from the birth of John. Mary remained a pure vessel...the tabernacle of the Lord.


2

It is generally understood that the sayings in the Gospels were in Aramaic, and there is no need to make an exception here. The Eerdmans Bible Dictionary (revised edition of 1987 edited by Allen C. Myers), on page 72 states: "It is generally agreed that Aramaic was the common language of Palestine in the first century A.D. Jesus and his disciples spoke ...


2

Greek word: Κεχαριτωμένη (source) Transliteration: Kecharitomene Translation: Literally,” You, who have been graced” (You that are highly favored, KJV) English: You (Second Person Singular) Have (present tense) Been (past participle of “to be”) Graced (past participle of “to grace”). Greek: KE – perfect tense (prior event/occurrence/happening ...


2

The assumptions behind your question are based on two false premises. First, the meaning of the words Jesus spoke to Mary and to Thomas eight days later is not the same. Jesus said to Mary, Do not hold on to me, whereas the words he spoke to Thomas were Reach here with your finger . . . and your hand . . . [and touch the wounds in my hands and side]...


2

Here is what I get from the Greek: Then the angel answered and said to her 1, "The Holy Spirit will come upon you and the power of the Highest will overshadow you. Consequently, the holy one who is born will be called the Son of God." ‒ Luke 1:35 Details: The verb γεννωμενον (parsed PPP-NNS) is being deployed as a noun. It has an article, το (NNS), so ...


2

According to Torah, if a betrothed bride is found to have been promiscuous, the punishment was clear: Deut 22:21 - she shall be brought to the door of her father’s house, and there the men of her city will stone her to death. For she has committed an outrage in Israel by being promiscuous in her father’s house. So you must purge the evil from among you. ...


2

It was a matter of wisdom, not trust. Joseph must obey God above all things. It is not wise to base decisions on a supernatural revelation given to someone else. So, whether Joseph wants to believe Mary's account of the angel or not, he should not make decisions based on it. Though sometimes forgotten today, this is a teaching in Scripture. For instance ... ...


2

Acts 22:3 English Standard Version “I am a Jew, born in Tarsus in Cilicia, but brought up in this city, educated at the feet of Gamaliel according to the strict manner of the law of our fathers, being zealous for God as all of you are this day. at παρὰ (para) Preposition Strong's Greek 3844: Gen: from; dat: beside, in the presence of; acc: alongside of. ...


1

The famous text of Gen 3:15 created a metanarrative that is alluded to throughout Bible history - two groups, the seed of the woman (the righteous) and the seed of the serpent (the wicked), would be mutually antagonistic. Sometimes the seed of the woman is also called, "sons of God", etc. Here are some examples: 1 John 3:10, By this it is evident who are ...


1

I would be careful about assuming that "her seed" refers to Jesus even though this protoevangeliun has been present since at least as early as the fourth century in Jerome's translation of the vulgate when he changed this pronoun from "he" to "she" because he had such high respect for Mary. Note the following: 1) Empereror Augustus's (the emperor up to ...


1

Did Mary give birth to other physical children? The Koine Language. The Koine Greek language at he time of Jesus was a very rich language, having an unparalleled and wide vocabulary and grammar , it was the language of literature. By the first century BC, was the universal dialect of its time ,it became the every day language, that people used and ...


1

Is it not simply to distinguish Mary the mother of our Lord from all the other Marys? If what you have produced in the text is correct(?!) then all the cases where the name μαριαμ is used are for Mary, Jesus's mother, except in cases where it is clearly indicated that it is not: So in John 11:28 it is used for the sister of Martha, (which is clear from the ...


1

There are seven blessings pronounced upon Mary, in all. Three are from Gabriel who says 'favoured', or it may be translated 'highly favoured', the word recorded by Luke, in Greek, being charitoo, Luke 1:28. Then the word eulogeo, 'blessed' is recorded, of Gabriel's words, in 1:28. And finally, the word charis is recorded 'favour with God' in 1:30. Simeon ...


1

After reading all these explanations, I need to bring some clarity to this statement made to Mary by Jesus on "Resurrection morning." This statement by Jesus is the "core" or the objective of Christianity. Mary obedience (not clinging to Jesus) before He ascended to the Father, is the hope of a "Resurrection life" to all who are called and chosen by the ...


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