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The wise men came after baby Jesus was presented in the temple. If you see a harmony of the Gospels, like Study Resources :: Harmony of the Gospels, you will find that the wise men came long after Jesus was presented in the temple. Presentation in the temple A woman who bore a son was ceremonially unclean for forty days (twice that if she bore a daughter ...


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There are two possible reasons why 'they were signing' (ἐνένευον) to him in Luke 1:62: Zechariah was mute and deaf. While there is no indication that the angel Gabriel brought about anything other than muteness,1 v. 22 states that he remained κωφός, which in addition to referring to a "lack of speech capability," can also imply a "lack of hearing capability,...


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The similar command in Matthew 10:37 shows that the ancient world understood this saying of Jesus to be not complete hatred 37 "Anyone who loves their father or mother more than me is not worthy of me; anyone who loves their son or daughter more than me is not worthy of me". There is no reason to assume an Aramaic source for the Gospels based on ...


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Summarizing Hastings Dictionary of Christ and the Gospels entry on wine bottles: In ancient Israel, the grapes were pressed in the winepress and left in the collection vats for a few days. Fermentation starts immediately on pressing, and this allows the first "tumultuous" (gassy) phase to pass. Then the must (fermenting juice) was put in clay jars to be ...


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If there is a contradiction at all between Paul's tradition and the tradition of the Gospel writers, it can be resolved as a text critical issue here in 1 Corinthians 11:24. Most of the early manuscripts simply have Τοῦτό μού ἐστιν τὸ σῶμα τὸ ὑπὲρ ὑμῶν - "This is my body, which is for you." The short phrase τὸ ὑπὲρ ὑμῶν also appears in 2 Corinthians 9:3, ...


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Similarly, Elisha instructed his servant in 2 Kings 4:29 Elisha said to Gehazi, "Tuck your cloak into your belt, take my staff in your hand and run. Don't greet anyone you meet, and if anyone greets you, do not answer. Lay my staff on the boy's face." Jesus sent his disciples out on a mission tour. He didn't want them to waste time and be ...


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It is very important to keep in mind that we have no manuscripts of Macion's gospel and no translations of it. Furthermore, we have no extant neutral or pro-Marcion commentaries. The two commentaries we have, by Tertullian and Epiphanius, have a strongly anti-Marcion agenda, furthermore they disagree with each other at some key points. This makes saying ...


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It is omitted in versions where the committee of experts behind the translation determined that those words were most likely not in the original text of Luke. In this particular case, the evidence that these words were not original is very strong, though not completely overwhelming. The shorter version is found in: Both extant Papyrus texts (P45 and P75, ...


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OP: Is it possible, through the interpretation of scripture, to determine approximately when this event happened? Yes, I believe it is. Luke 10:18 in Greek (SBL GNT), with the New American Standard Bible, reads this way: εἶπεν δὲ αὐτοῖς· Ἐθεώρουν τὸν Σατανᾶν ὡς ἀστραπὴν ἐκ τοῦ οὐρανοῦ πεσόντα. eipen de autois, Etheōroun ton Satanan ōs astrapēn ek tou ...


12

There are three variants of the Greek text here: (a) ... τῇ μεμνηστευμένῃ αὐτῷ γυναικί ... ("his betrothed wife") (b) ... τῇ μεμνηστευμένῃ αὐτῷ ... ("his betrothed") (c) ... τῇ γυναικί αυτου ... ("his wife") Variant (a) is found in the majority of Greek manuscripts, including the Codex Alexandrinus (early 5th century). It is the reading ...


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Tithing was an institute of the Mosaic Law and consisted of agricultural produce and reared livestock (Lv 27:30-33). The Israelites offered the tithe to the landless Levites who in turn offered a tenth of the tithe to the Aaronic priesthood (Nm 18:26-28). Unlike the other tribes, the Levites were denied any inheritance or land ownership in Israel. They were, ...


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Some say the "Kingdom of Heaven" refers to the a physical/political kingdom on earth while the "Kingdom of God" is the spiritual, coming reign of Christ. Arguments against the two being the same often come down to hair splitting and misinterpretation of verses. For example, the site listed above relies on a single verse in an attempt to ...


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The Greek word ἀλώπηξ (alopex, fox) appears in the Septuagint (LXX) and other early literature. In western culture the word has long signified craftiness or cleverness, and this meaning had even come to be associated with the Greek word by the first century. However, it is not likely that Jesus spoke this phrase in Greek. According to the NET translators: ...


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0) AN APOLOGY FOR THE LENGTHINESS OF THIS POST Ι realize that by apologizing for the length of this post, I'm actually making the post longer. But so be it. I tried making the post shorter without compromising the content, but was not able to. You can skip most of the verses I quote without missing much, if you want. 1) THE PHRASE "DAUGHTER OF JERUSALEM"...


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Jesus means none of the four things you noted Here is a slightly expanded context to the words you quote. John the Baptist had just sent messengers to confirm some things about Jesus (Lk 7:18-23). After they leave, Jesus says some very impressive words about John the Baptist (Lk 7:24-28). At this point is... Luke 7:29-35 29 (All the people, even the ...


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The word used in the Greek original is ἀσκός “skin, hide”, but usually a “skin made into a bag, wine skin”. http://perseus.uchicago.edu/cgi-bin/philologic/getobject.pl?c.9:2:100.LSJ The point of the Biblical parable is that a wine skin will dry out with age and become brittle. If you put fresh grape juice in an old wine skin the fermenting of the wine ...


10

Zacchaeus (Luke 19:1-10) tl;dr; Analysis of the grammar indicates that Zacchaeus is on the verge of a large shift in his understanding of his place and power as well as the nature of of whom this Jesus is. Jesus, having demonstrated the capacity to know the hearts of humans, understands the eternal implications of this shift. Specific Context Jesus ...


10

Whatever the solution to this problem, and there are good solutions, It appears to me that Luke mentions Quirinius at least in part to connect Jesus’ birth in the mind of his original readers with the census of A.D. 6. Here’s why The census that year sparked a major Jewish revolt. Luke knows of this event because he refers to it in Acts 5:37. After this ...


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The idea of a "son" in first century Christian writings was different than it is today. The term "son" simply signified that he came from God and bore His image. (examples) Both of these things are true of Adam: Then God said, “Let Us make man in Our image, according to Our likeness . . . " God created man in His own image, in the image of God He created ...


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Jesus is being compared to John the Baptist by the Pharisees in that John ate sparingly and only things such as locust and honey and drank no wine. Jesus ate pretty much whatever he wanted to and drank wine, and was accused of gluttony and being a winebibber or drunken, because of this. They thought John the Baptist diet strange and too controlled, but when ...


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Not all prophets have recorded prophecy It should be noted that it is possible to a prophet and not have any of your prophetic utterances recorded in scripture, for example in 1 Kings 18:4 we read "For so it was, while Jezebel massacred the prophets of the LORD, that Obadiah had taken one hundred prophets and hidden them, fifty to a cave, and had fed them ...


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I wouldn't call it a "deeper hidden meaning", but a "graphic obvious meaning" -- at least to John the Baptist's hearers. Here, and in the parallel synoptic passages (Matt 3:11 // Mark 1:7 // Luke 3:16), John emphasizes the greatness of the one to come by reinforcing his own unworthiness in comparison. He uses the word picture of undoing the sandals -- the ...


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The short answer is because they chose to. This "quip" answer reveals the challenge of answering most "why" questions, as "why" normally requires inference of motive, rather than actually interpreting anything directly from the text (unless the text gives insight into motive, in which case the "why" question would likely not even be a question, as it would ...


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A fundamental problem of this question is the a priori of "the current consensus of the writing of the gospels". Such a consensus does not exist. This two-sources-theory is just one of several attempts to reconcile the difficulties in explaining the synoptic problem, and admitted: fairly popular at that. There are other theories, which like this one have ...


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A Generation is 40 years in Bible. Here are some examples. Numbers 32:13 (ESV) - And the Lord's anger was kindled against Israel, and he made them wander in the wilderness forty years, until all the generation that had done evil in the sight of the Lord was gone. Deuteronomy 1:34-36 (ESV) - And the Lord heard your words and was angered, and he swore, ‘Not ...


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The name “Theophilus” may indicate a primarily Gentile audience, perhaps in Rome, given its decidedly Greek nature and that Luke’s account ends with Paul’s arrival in Rome. However, Theophilus could have just as easily been a diaspora Jew living in Rome. Heinz Joachim Held takes this perspective further by hypothesizing that Luke’s intent was to reach the ...


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While Luke indeed points out in his Gospel that Joseph was of the house of David,1 it is curious why this was of importance to the narrative, since Jesus was conceived without the seed of Joseph. This led many early Christian Church Fathers and scholars to propose that Mary is also of the house and lineage of David.2 From here several hypotheses emerged to ...


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