16

There were two thieves reviling Jesus; one then repented. John Chrysostom, who was fluent in, and therefore familiar with, the Koine Greek of the New Testament, made no mention of the use of the grammar with regard to the apparent confusion and contradiction between the gospel accounts. Instead, he noted the following - Now that you may understand what is ...


7

Although the prominence of long lists in the court tales of Daniel is often noted by commentators, I am aware of only one study devoted to understanding their use in the book, and their relation to literary conventions in the ancient Near East: Peter W. Coxon, "The 'List' Genre and Narrative Style in the Court Tales of Daniel", Journal for the Study of the ...


4

There are no other servants in Genesis 9:25. The phrase "servant of servants" is an example of one of several forms of emphasis in OT Hebrew. This type of emphatic form is constructed by doubling a noun or verb root. The intent in Genesis 9:25 is to say, the lowliest of servants, the ultimate OT Hebrew pejorative. Other verses using this emphatic form, ...


4

God shall enlarge Japheth, and he shall dwell in the tents of Shem; and Canaan shall be his servant. - Genesis 9:27 There is no indication that anything in this verse is mutually exclusive. That is to say: Japheth would do all of these things. We can first establish that the descendants of Japheth were enlarged: ... to them belonged all Europe, and lesser ...


3

Are Some Bible Scripture verses merely monotonously descriptive/instructive Or do they have more meaningful undertones?(layers of meaning) Yes, they do have more meaningful undertones. A good example is the curtains in Exodus 26: 1“Make the tabernacle with ten curtains of finely twisted linen and blue, purple and scarlet yarn, with cherubim woven into them ...


3

The issue is that it is difficult if not impossible to divorce the spiritual/supernatural elements from the literary aspect of the psalms. From a pure literary perspective, sure, one can say that hyperbole, metaphor, etc. are employed in the writing of the psalms, even in this specific case for Psalm 44 in question. The trouble comes when such ...


3

Philo argues at length in De Sobrietate that "qaton" is not a measure of age at all. II. (6) Such then is the condition of the sober man; but when Moses speaks of Noah's "younger son," he is not so much meaning to make a statement respecting his age, as to show the disposition with which those persons are endued who are inclined to innovation; since ...


3

Is it possible that King Saul merely asks who David's father was in 1 Samuel 17 for rhetorical effect in response to seeing how a young shepherd boy like David killed a giant named Goliath? Unlikely. 1 Samuel 17: 55 Now when Saul saw David going out against the Philistine, he said to Abner the commander of the army, “Abner, whose son is this young man?” ...


2

Jesus faced the same insult. John 8:48 (NASB) 48 The Jews answered and said to Him, “Do we not say rightly that You are a Samaritan and have a demon?” The charge was illegitimacy. Saul was telling Jonathan that his mother played the harlot (perverse rebellious woman who uncovered her nakedness) and the result was Jonathan, who was an illegitimate son. ...


2

Saul understood that David was being preferred by Israel over himself. He was concerned that he would lose his kingdom to David, which meant that Jonathan, his son, would also lose the kingdom. Jonathan did not care about any of this, since he loved David as deeply as a brother. As a result, Saul became angry with Jonathan. He thought Jonathan should have ...


2

עֶ֥בֶד עֲבָדִ֖ים abad abadim "A servant of servants." Meaning: an extremely lowly or humbled person. This is a Biblical Hebrew equivalent to a superlative (which they don't technically have, but create using this construct—e.g. 'Song of Songs': meaning, essentially, 'the most [sublime] of Songs' or 'A Song par Excellence'). As such "servants" has no ...


2

I see no exaggeration in either Joshua or Psalms. What we know is this: The majority of the enemy was killed with hailstones sent as a miracle of god Some, a minority, were killed with the edge of the sword. There two facts alone suggest that God significantly intervened in a way that if He had not, the battle would not have been won. However, God also ...


2

Brad McCoy defines chiasm as "the use of inverted parallelism of form and/or content which moves toward and away from a strategic central component" and says: Chiasmus (or chiasm) is an important structural device/form commonly found in ancient literature and oratory, both secular and sacred.1 Elisabeth Schüssler Fiorenza makes the case Revelation ...


2

The literary device at play here is not synecdoche, but literary dependence and elaboration. When the Gospels of Matthew, Mark and Luke are laid side by side and read synoptically ('with the same eye') in the original Greek language, it is clear that there is a literary dependency among them. Further study shows that Mark was the first to be written, with ...


2

The genre and imagery of Psalm 45 is similar to that of Song of Songs. The language is simple and embarrassingly sensual (e.g. verse 10 נִצְּבָה שֵׁגַל לִימִינְךָ, "a concubine on your right"), which has led commentators, Jewish and Christian to insist that this Psalm be interpreted allegorically as referring variously to a messianic king of one ...


2

The simple literary structure of Psalm 45 as it has come to us is uncomplicated. Psalm 45 appears to be bridal wedding hymn celebrating the marriage of a king of Israel to a Tyrian princess. V1: Comments by the author V2-5: Praise of the king about to married V6-7: Reminder that the king is only a deputy of God (whose throne is eternal) V8-9: Praise to the ...


2

In verse 18 Paul was referring back to the points he made in the previous chapters about the wisdom of man versus the wisdom of God (see 1 Corinthians 1:10-2:16). He was saying that if any people are wise by the world’s standards, let them forsake that carnal wisdom (become fools from the unbeliever’s viewpoint) so that they may walk in the true wisdom of ...


2

Saul's royal court governed a country of many millions of people which would have required both a central and distributed bureaucracy or reasonable size. David, when he began his service as a court musician (1 Sam 16:19-23), would have been a very minor court official with the most perfunctory (brief with minimal details) introduction to Saul. This would ...


1

Trying to analyze (1 Corinthians 3:18) ".....he must become foolish...." 1 Corinthians 3:18 NASB 18 Let no man deceive himself. If any man among you thinks that he is wise in this age, he must become foolish, so that he may become wise. "Let no man deceive himself. If any man among you thinks that he is wise in this age"'(Vs 18a) Paul ...


1

Anthropomorphism is the attribution of human traits, emotions, or intentions to God. God is not man but sometimes the Bible attributes a human trait, like changing His mind, repenting, etc. to Him. Then we can better understand Him at our level. Psalm 32:8 I will instruct you and teach you in the way you should go; I will counsel you with my loving eye on ...


1

“Synonymous Parallelism“ is used in Daniel 12:4. Secrets are concealed, so the phrase in [12:4] “close up the words and seal the book” ( סְתֹ֧ם הַדְּבָרִ֛ים וַֽחֲתֹ֥ם הַסֵּ֖פֶר ) - states the same idea 2 different ways. Refer to https://www.britannica.com/topic/synonymous-parallelism.


1

The Psalm of thanksgiving that is Ps 107 can be analysed as follows: V1-3 - Introduction Refrain (V1), "Give thanks to the LORD, for He is good; His loving devotion endures forever." V4-9 - Stanza about Desert Wastelands V8 has the refrain, "Let them give thanks to the LORD for His loving devotion and His wonders to the sons of men." V10-...


1

Let's see the parallelism in Psalm 107:18 They loathed all food and drew near the gates of death. In fact, it is an antithetic parallelism; "loathed" is contrasted with "drew near" and "food" is contrasted with "death". Food symbolizes life.


1

It's a matter of a difference in the language. Love and hate were being used as relative terms, not absolute. The best explanation I've seen is Eli Lizorkin-Eyzenberg's explanation in his commentary on Genesis, Becoming Israel, p.72 in pdf version: In fact, the idea of “disliking, hating or favoring someone less” works quite differently in Biblical Hebrew....


1

I would substitute your use of the words "emotionally and mentally consumed" with the biblical principle upholding the concept, which is idolatry. Thats what he's talking about, and yes, id agree.


1

Some readers might have the perspective that Psalm 44:3a (NASB) For by their own sword they did not possess the land, And their own arm did not save them.... is to be interpreted that the Israelites physical involvement by using actual weaponry in the Beth-horon battle was Merely an auxiliary factor. Therefore, they might view the text as emphasizing that ...


1

Adding to Der Übermensch's answer is the irony of the situation. Onesimus was Philemon's servant and Philemon's house was a place where Christians met. Undoubtedly Onesimus would have been involved in helping with whatever was needed to prepare and conduct "church" gatherings. For example, likely Onesimus prepared and/or served meals and/or washed feet. ...


1

There is an allusion to the meaning of the name Onesimus’ (Greek Ὀνήσιμος), “profitable or useful,” in v. 11 by means of the synonym εὔχρηστος (“profitable”) and its antonym ἄχρηστος (“unprofitable”). However, the actual pun occurs in v. 20: Κʹ ναὶ ἀδελφέ, ἐγώ σου ὀναίμην ἐν κυρίῳ· ἀνάπαυσόν μου τὰ σπλάγχνα ἐν Χριστῷ. NA28, ©2012 20 Yes, brother, let me ...


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