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14

The barley cake does not have the gluten content of wheat, so it does not stick together like wheat bread. In this case it is not even a proper leavened loaf, an "ugah", just a lowly "tslil', unleavened, roasted dough eaten only by the poorest of the poor. As it rolls towards the camp of Midian it breaks into crumbs, just as Gideon's forces are progressively ...


9

Marriage Prohibitions The two references you give (Dt 7:3, Ez 9:12) explicitly help answer your question (though the Ezra one is technically irrelevant since it was centuries after the time of Samson). Both passages list an explicit set of people when a slightly expanded context is shown: Deut 7:1-3 (KJV) 1When the LORD thy God shall bring thee into the ...


9

In fact this is a case of a pretty simple and straightforward verse that has been unnecessarily complicated by its translators. The word in question ירב pretty much translates into fight, contend. See Hosea 4:4, and Strong's concordance. In fact almost all modern translations agree that this is the basic meaning of this word albiet with minor modifications. ...


8

The Cambridge Bible for Schools and Colleges explains this succinctly: This peculiarity has a bearing upon what follows: being left-handed he naturally fastened his sword on the right side instead of the left, and thus was able to conceal a weapon without rousing suspicion. Being left-handed, Ehud was able to conceal his weapon and, when they were alone, ...


7

There isn’t any historical consensus regarding the origins of leavened bread. However, the earliest archaeological evidence that we have happens to be from ancient Egypt: The development of leavened bread can also probably be traced to prehistoric times. Yeast spores occur everywhere, including the surface of cereal grains, so any dough left to rest ...


7

Rashi comments on textual problems, he never gives general information that an astute reader could otherwise independently infer. The textual problem in Judges 12:7 is the place name of Jephtah's burial. The problem is that the place name ערי גלעד "Arei Gilaad" is not otherwise known to us from the OT, and that the form of the name looks like a plural in ...


7

No, the Caananites were not destroyed by the Jewish people. The cited verse in Joshua 10:40 speaks only of the completion of Joshua's campaign against the Canaanie tribes of the south. In the next chapter Joshua fights the northern tribes. In chapter 13, when Joshua is already too old to continue the fight, G-d tells Joshua that his job is incomplete; he ...


6

This happened because: 1) The rape was particularly depraved and shocking. It was a gang rape which went on for hours. The victim was severely injured and died. 2) At the time of the rape both the Levite and his wife were under the protection of a city resident. Taking her away by force and raping her violated a sacred principle of Eastern hospitality. ...


5

In the Samson cycle of stories, the wedding riddle is a metaphor of the impossible situation that Samson, and by identification, the Israelites, are in. This cycle of stories deals with the ambivalent nature of the relationship with the Philistines. On the one hand, they are bitterest of enemies. One the other, there is rampant assimilation into Philistine ...


5

It does remind one of "What have I got in my pocket?", doesn't it? In the Hobbit, Bilbo and Gollum agree that, since it isn't an entirely proper riddle, Gollum will get three guesses. It seems that Samson and his potential in-laws agreed to a similar solution. Reading on: And in three days they could not solve the riddle. On the fourth day they ...


5

The answer isn't symbolism - it was that the Ishmaelites were wealthy traders of luxury items (gold, jewels, spices) who would travel to distant lands like Ethiopia and Yemen for their precious cargo. They would ride on camels because it was impossible to cross the hostile desert any other way. It was a dangerous trip, and they were well paid for their ...


5

Ehud was a Benjamite and the phrase translated "left handed man" is a very interesting Hebrew idiom. It literally reads "a man bound/restricted in his right hand." The same phrase is used in Judges 20:16 to describe 700 slingers (also of the tribe of Benjamin). These two verses are the only places where this idiom is used. Judges 20:16 ...


4

"Okay, there's an eater. Bulldozers 'eat' buildings, don't they? Oh wait, we haven't invented those yet. Venus flytrap? Nope, haven't discovered those yet. OK, must be an animal. Or maybe a bunch of them like a swarm of locusts. Oh, but it's strong...maybe a dragon or a leviathan or a lion or a bull.." "Now, something sweet. Hmm. Gummy bears? Snickers? No......


4

According to many Rabbis, Meroz is a planet from which heavenly beings inhabit like the JUDGES 5:20 REFERENCES: 5:20 From the sky the stars fought. From their courses, they fought against Sisera. 5:23 'Curse Meroz,' said the angel of Yahweh. 'Curse bitterly its inhabitants, because they didn't come to help Yahweh, to help Yahweh against the mighty.' Rabbi ...


4

In addition to Soldarnal's point I would like to add that there is evidence that Jephthah's dagheter's request to "mourn her virginity" was an ancient cultic rite associated with the cult of Anath and Baa'l, The role of women in this rite is reminiscent of the part that the goddess Anat plays in mourning and searching for the dead Baal (GORDON UH 67 ...


4

The word raḥamatayim is the dual form of the word reḥem. This root literally means “womb” but can also mean “woman” for obvious reasons. So Sisera’s mother is comforting herself, saying the delay is because the soldiers are collecting slave girls: “A womb or a pair-of-wombs for every man.” But in English, this reads more naturally as “A womb or two for ...


4

This answer quotes Rashi, who provides two explanations. The first argument seems textually thin - there are no other examples of calling someone by a tribe name based on their mother's side (see the single exception explained by the Radak, which doesn't actually attribute the tribe but describes their lineage). If anything, a simpler textual explanation is ...


4

I believe you are missing the fact that chapters 17 through 21 of the book of Judges are out of chronological sequence. According to the time line provided at BibleHub, the incident recorded in Judges 18, concerning the Danites, happened only about 25 years after the land had been allotted to the tribes. Robert Jamieson says this: The Danites had a ...


4

There are mainly two ways in which the Judges were chosen by the people: By proving oneself to be a mighty warrior and capable to lead and protect the people. By providing the people with guidance in biblical law and literally judging them and settling their disputes as Moses did in his times (see Exodus 18). Or by delivering divine messages to the people ...


4

Ri Kara here explains these verses as follows (this may also be the opinion of Rashi): 7:5 presents 2 ways of drinking the water that different groups followed: Those who lap as a dog laps Those who kneel (and drink from their hands) According to Kara, "lapping as a dog laps" implies that they were licking the water while on their (hands and) knees. They ...


4

The conquest of this part of the land from Sihon comes from Numbers 21:24 (NRSV): Israel put him to the sword, and took possession of his [Sihon's] land from the Arnon to the Jabbok, as far as to the Ammonites; for the boundary of the Ammonites was strong. This is also the fact that is referred to by Jephthah in his reply to the king of Ammon (Judges 11:...


4

The name Jerubbaal (yerubba'al) is clearly a compound word. If we follow the etymology given by the verse, it would have been derived from yarib (fight,, root ריב) + ba'al. But the first etymology seems to have required the name to be * yeribba'al. It seems more likely to have been derived from yarubb (be great, root רבב) + ba'al. The root רבב admittedly ...


4

It is only the men of Shechem and the house of Millo which the text mentions. It is not even a complete tribe. So, therefore, significant though the use of the word 'king' is, the last words in Judges still stand : In those days there was no king in Israel.


4

The answer is a practical one on Judges 3. If a sword is strapped to the right side it cannot be drawn by the right hand. Similarly, if a sword is strapped to the left side it cannot be drawn by the left hand. In order to draw a sword, on usually reaches across the stomach to withdraw a sword. This was Ehud's advantage - he was left-handed and the king ...


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