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12

Welcome to the world of Hebrew homographs. אִשָּׁה, with a kamatz under the shin is "woman", and אִשֶּׁה with a segol under the shin is a sacrifice that was burnt in its entirety. The first is a simple noun, the second is a noun based on אֵשׁ, fire, with a suffix ה indicating "of". There is no etymological connection between these words ...


9

Marriage Prohibitions The two references you give (Dt 7:3, Ez 9:12) explicitly help answer your question (though the Ezra one is technically irrelevant since it was centuries after the time of Samson). Both passages list an explicit set of people when a slightly expanded context is shown: Deut 7:1-3 (KJV) 1When the LORD thy God shall bring thee into the ...


9

In fact this is a case of a pretty simple and straightforward verse that has been unnecessarily complicated by its translators. The word in question ירב pretty much translates into fight, contend. See Hosea 4:4, and Strong's concordance. In fact almost all modern translations agree that this is the basic meaning of this word albiet with minor modifications. ...


8

The Cambridge Bible for Schools and Colleges explains this succinctly: This peculiarity has a bearing upon what follows: being left-handed he naturally fastened his sword on the right side instead of the left, and thus was able to conceal a weapon without rousing suspicion. Being left-handed, Ehud was able to conceal his weapon and, when they were alone, ...


7

No, the Caananites were not destroyed by the Jewish people. The cited verse in Joshua 10:40 speaks only of the completion of Joshua's campaign against the Canaanie tribes of the south. In the next chapter Joshua fights the northern tribes. In chapter 13, when Joshua is already too old to continue the fight, G-d tells Joshua that his job is incomplete; he ...


7

Can God make a rock so big that even He can't lift it? God is generally held to be omnipotent, and there's a classical logical paradox involving that omnipotence: can God make a rock so big even He can't lift it? If He can't make the rock, he's not omnipotent, but if He can't lift it, he's not omnipotent either. Personally, I believe that the logical answer ...


6

This happened because: 1) The rape was particularly depraved and shocking. It was a gang rape which went on for hours. The victim was severely injured and died. 2) At the time of the rape both the Levite and his wife were under the protection of a city resident. Taking her away by force and raping her violated a sacred principle of Eastern hospitality. ...


5

The answer isn't symbolism - it was that the Ishmaelites were wealthy traders of luxury items (gold, jewels, spices) who would travel to distant lands like Ethiopia and Yemen for their precious cargo. They would ride on camels because it was impossible to cross the hostile desert any other way. It was a dangerous trip, and they were well paid for their ...


5

According to many Rabbis, Meroz is a planet from which heavenly beings inhabit like the JUDGES 5:20 REFERENCES: 5:20 From the sky the stars fought. From their courses, they fought against Sisera. 5:23 'Curse Meroz,' said the angel of Yahweh. 'Curse bitterly its inhabitants, because they didn't come to help Yahweh, to help Yahweh against the mighty.' Rabbi ...


5

The word raḥamatayim is the dual form of the word reḥem. This root literally means “womb” but can also mean “woman” for obvious reasons. So Sisera’s mother is comforting herself, saying the delay is because the soldiers are collecting slave girls: “A womb or a pair-of-wombs for every man.” But in English, this reads more naturally as “A womb or two for ...


5

In addition to Soldarnal's point I would like to add that there is evidence that Jephthah's dagheter's request to "mourn her virginity" was an ancient cultic rite associated with the cult of Anath and Baa'l, The role of women in this rite is reminiscent of the part that the goddess Anat plays in mourning and searching for the dead Baal (GORDON UH 67 ...


5

Ehud was a Benjamite and the phrase translated "left handed man" is a very interesting Hebrew idiom. It literally reads "a man bound/restricted in his right hand." The same phrase is used in Judges 20:16 to describe 700 slingers (also of the tribe of Benjamin). These two verses are the only places where this idiom is used. Judges 20:16 ...


5

"Has anyone seen God or not?" That depends upon what you think "God" means. If you believe that the God of the Old Testament is the same person as the Father of the New Testament, you will find a glaring contradiction within a single chapter of the Bible. John 1 begins with stating that Jesus is God. Later in the same chapter he says &...


4

This answer quotes Rashi, who provides two explanations. The first argument seems textually thin - there are no other examples of calling someone by a tribe name based on their mother's side (see the single exception explained by the Radak, which doesn't actually attribute the tribe but describes their lineage). If anything, a simpler textual explanation is ...


4

I believe you are missing the fact that chapters 17 through 21 of the book of Judges are out of chronological sequence. According to the time line provided at BibleHub, the incident recorded in Judges 18, concerning the Danites, happened only about 25 years after the land had been allotted to the tribes. Robert Jamieson says this: The Danites had a ...


4

There are mainly two ways in which the Judges were chosen by the people: By proving oneself to be a mighty warrior and capable to lead and protect the people. By providing the people with guidance in biblical law and literally judging them and settling their disputes as Moses did in his times (see Exodus 18). Or by delivering divine messages to the people ...


4

The forgiveness is not a prerogative of any created angel, even of a highest of them, for forgiveness is prerogative of only God. When God says that His Angel in whom is His name should be obeyed for "He will not forgive", it means that this Angel in whom is the name of God is of the equal dignity and standing with God, and if so, then also co-eternal to Him,...


4

There seems to be a confusion here. They are not different biblical texts reflecting different traditions from different authors that may or may not be reconciled, but different versions of the same original biblical text and author. The MT reads the "seventh", while the Septuagint and Syriac read the "fourth". That is the reason for the difference between ...


4

The conquest of this part of the land from Sihon comes from Numbers 21:24 (NRSV): Israel put him to the sword, and took possession of his [Sihon's] land from the Arnon to the Jabbok, as far as to the Ammonites; for the boundary of the Ammonites was strong. This is also the fact that is referred to by Jephthah in his reply to the king of Ammon (Judges 11:...


4

There are Old and New Testament references to “angels of the Lord,” “an angel of the Lord,” and “the angel of the Lord.” It seems when the definite article “the” is used, it is specifying a unique being, separate from the other angels. The angel of the Lord speaks as God, identifies Himself with God, and exercises the responsibilities of God (Genesis 16:7-...


4

The name Jerubbaal (yerubba'al) is clearly a compound word. If we follow the etymology given by the verse, it would have been derived from yarib (fight,, root ריב) + ba'al. But the first etymology seems to have required the name to be * yeribba'al. It seems more likely to have been derived from yarubb (be great, root רבב) + ba'al. The root רבב admittedly ...


4

It is only the men of Shechem and the house of Millo which the text mentions. It is not even a complete tribe. So, therefore, significant though the use of the word 'king' is, the last words in Judges still stand : In those days there was no king in Israel.


4

The answer is a practical one on Judges 3. If a sword is strapped to the right side it cannot be drawn by the right hand. Similarly, if a sword is strapped to the left side it cannot be drawn by the left hand. In order to draw a sword, on usually reaches across the stomach to withdraw a sword. This was Ehud's advantage - he was left-handed and the king ...


4

Without disputing any of other answers, I wanted to provide more interpretations and arguments: Emendation switching "Amalek" with "valley" Several manuscripts of the LXX have “in the valley” rather than “into Amalek.” Brannan, R., & Loken, I. (2014). The Lexham Textual Notes on the Bible (Jdg 5:14). Bellingham, WA: Lexham Press. ...


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