5

Matthew 5:22 is written in parallelism. But I tell you that everyone who is angry with his brother without a cause shall be in danger of the judgment and whoever shall say to his brother, 'Raca!' shall be in danger of the council; and whoever shall say, 'You fool!' shall be in danger of the fire of Gehenna. It poetically expresses lower court higher ...


4

The Revelation of Jesus Christ is that which God gave unto him : The Revelation of Jesus Christ which God gave unto him ... [Revelation 1:1, KJV] If it did reveal the time of his coming, then it is of God that it is revealed. But I do not believe that the exact time is revealed. The circumstances of his coming are revealed, just as we see in 2 ...


3

Does God really forget our sins? The Bible never says that God will "forget" out sins, rather we are told that God will not remember them. Forgetting is passive; like forgetting where you put the car keys. Forgetting is not done deliberately. However, when God declares that he will "not remember" our sins, that is active. The word "remember" (זָכַר) has ...


2

As stated in this realted answer: What does Genesis 3:16 literally say? He is saying that the pain during child birth will be greatly multiplied. He is the one that caused the pain to multiply. In the direct Hebrew he says that He will "greatly multiply" pain in conception: http://biblehub.com/interlinear/genesis/3-16.htm


2

The operative word here is דִּין (din). Its primary meaning is "to judge". That much is not controversial. To understand the meaning of the ancient Hebrew idea of judgement we must recall two things: The idea of judging and governing are essentially synonymous. A king ruled/governed by being supreme judge, eg, 1 Sam 2:10, Isa 3:13, Jer 22:16, ...


2

In the Massoretic Text (MT) on which most of the translations are primarily based, these two verses contains ambiguities that challenge translators. In the MT these verses are Exodus 13-14: וְכִֽי־יִשְׁאַ֥ל אִ֛ישׁ מֵעִ֥ם רֵעֵ֖הוּ וְנִשְׁבַּ֣ר אוֹ־מֵ֑ת בְּעָלָ֥יו אֵין־עִמּ֖וֹ שַׁלֵּ֥ם יְשַׁלֵּֽם אִם־בְּעָלָ֥יו עִמּ֖וֹ לֹ֣א יְשַׁלֵּ֑ם אִם־שָׂכִ֣יר ה֔וּא בָּ֖א ...


2

I suppose looking at the verse in complete isolation as you suggest, one could argue that Jesus might be speaking of avoiding worldly rather than heavenly judgment. This is not what is suggested, however, in the parallel passage in Luke (6:36-38): Be ye therefore merciful, as your Father also is merciful. Judge not, and ye shall not be judged This is ...


2

1. Question: Rephrase: According to Matthew 7, Is our "final judgment" by God, (in the eschatological sense), contingent on how/if we judge others in our lives? Or, is Jesus stating that you can expect people to not judge you, if you don't judge them? Context: Throughout this sermon, Jesus' is consistently speaking about judgment from the "father": ...


1

Meaning of Judge First, let's consider the word "judge". It can mean two things in the English language. One is to pass judgement on someone, the other is to observe. The bible encourages us to observe throughout, particularly "you'll know them by their fruits," so we're commanded to judge others in that sense. But what of the sense of ...


1

The question inherently confuses and conflates so many things to begin with. Eternal life, for example, is not an adverb (i.e. you eternally have life; as opposed to eternal life: life that is undending for those in possession of it), and as such doesn't preclude punishment before being admitted thereto. "Indeed," says St. Paul, 2 Corinthians 5:10 ...


1

Along with the answer of Enegue, and the comments of Bach, I should add a linguistic particular regarding the occurrences of the conceptual root we've discuss here (בקע). Often, in the MT, we found expressed a particular concept by different graphical roots (someone speaks about them as 'allomorphic roots'). In this case, the same basic concept included in ...


1

There is the aspect of the spiritually dead, who are not in Christ. Those that are in Christ are spiritually alive, the living. However, 1 Pet. 4:5 was written approx. 64-65 AD before Peter died. It had a first century AD application which was the prophesy Christ had given in Matt. 24 - 25 when He said He would return at the destruction of the temple in ...


1

First things first. There is a big difference between the words avenge and revenge. As a writer (here) suggested: Avenge is a verb meaning to inflict a punishment or penalty for an injury or a wrong. We will avenge your son’s death. I will avenge those who sullied your name. The victim was avenged after the shooter was sentenced. “As her family, we do not ...


1

Samson showed signs of immaturity I’m not sure that God answered Samson’s prayer based on Samson’s reasoning, even if it might have been a contributing factor, it most certainly was not the primary contributing factor. Samson made it personal because his eyes were gouged but in fact his duty and sole purpose of life was to fulfill his calling for which he ...


1

Probably for the first time in his adult life Samson was physically weak. He was humbled before God, and his enemies. Whilst he was blind, it seems he finally saw spiritually. Normally he might have just gone and taken revenge for himself like at other times in Judges 14 and 15. This time he had to ask God...and God was gracious to him. The destruction ...


1

The origin is of Hewbrew / Judaism mysticism. Some suppose it to be from the Midrash and Talmud oral traditions passed down from the 3rd - 1st century BC, and then later picked up and reprinted as the Book of Enoch. From Chabad.org, "Nephilim: Fallen Angels, Giants, or Men?" "The Midrash3 relates that when the generation of the Flood went astray, G‑d ...


1

As this question touches on eschatology you will get very significant differences in the various answers here because there are wide range of hermeneutical systems at work here. Many of the answers previously stated are dependent on a system of hermeneutics that includes some degree of either partial or full preterism. I hold to neither of those systems. ...


1

Context matters, and determines which "fire" is / was being used. The word "fire" was a metaphor in the OT for God's fury and judgment. "3 He hath cut off in his fierce anger all the horn of Israel: he hath drawn back his right hand from before the enemy, and he burned against Jacob like a flaming fire, which devoureth round about..... he poured out his ...


1

Jesus gave the timing and described the scene of the judgment in the previous chapter: [Mat 24:34 KJV] (34) Verily I say unto you, This generation shall not pass, till all these things be fulfilled. He could not and did not reveal the precise hour or day or even the season of his arrival because God does not set days for judgment: [Job 24:1 NIV] (1) "...


1

I believe this will happen at the second coming of Christ, Mathew 25:31 onwards. Where on the judgement day he will separate the sheep from the goats. But when the Son of Man comes in his glory, and all the holy angels with him, then he will sit on the throne of his glory. Before him all the nations will be gathered, and he will separate them one from ...


1

Now. Also if you aren't born again in the land of the dead. If while in the land of the dead you reject the Messiah than during the second death in the lake of fire. If you receive the holy spirit in this realm or the land of the dead than your fire baptism is when you look Yahweh in the eyes, since he is an all consuming fire and it is painful for people to ...


1

Paul was not writing for us; he was writing for the Corinthians. And so, he was not talking about sin and punishment, but about the establishment of his church in Corinth and, in particular, the loyalty the Corinthians owe to Paul. Paul compares the Corinthians to babies, whom he has fed milk not solid food (1 Corinthians 3:1-2). While they are quarrelling ...


1

A few verses earlier Jesus says that He is leaving, and that He has to go so that the comforter (the Holy Spirit) will be sent. The verse you are questioning is in a list of the things that the Holy Spirit will do. Verse 16:8 says that the Holy Spirit will reprove the world of sin, righteousness, and judgement. Your verse in question 16:10 means that the ...


1

Your question is really about the meaning of the English word “remember”. “Remember” can be the opposite of “forget”, but is also used simply to mean “think about, ponder, bear in mind”. To say that God will “not remember” your sins does not mean that he will forget them, but simply that he will not hold them against you. The usage of “remember” in old and ...


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