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9

"Wandering stars" were understood to be the planets (Gr. planetes - the word used here), whose transit in the sky appeared quite chaotic in antiquity compared to the paths of the other bodies. In his commentary on Jude, Bede (ca 672-735) explains: The wandering stars, which are seven1 never rise or set in the same place as they did on the previous day ...


9

This issue is addressed in detail in Richard Bauckham's commentary onmJude and II Peter, published by Thomas Nelson in its Word Biblical Commentary series. The literary link that you hypothesize is "The Book of Enoch," which is a very real work, and which is still accepted as canon by the Ethiopian Coptic Church. You can find the full text of the book of ...


6

Are the imprisoned spirits in 1 Peter 3:19 human spirits or fallen angels? Did the demons worry about being imprisoned by Jesus? Was there a prison for demons at Peter's time. The apostle Peter identifies these spirits as those who had “once been disobedient when the patience of God was waiting in Noah’s days.” (1 Peter. 3:20) Clearly, Peter was referring to ...


6

Titus 1: 12 One of Crete's own prophets has said it: "Cretans are always liars, evil brutes, lazy gluttons." 13a This saying is true. Under inspiration, Paul wrote this and cited Epimenides' Cretica. There are many true sayings outside of the Bible. Truth is a necessary condition but not sufficient to claim inspired work of the Lord. The writer ...


5

The ASV and the KJV are based on a different set of Greek manuscripts, so this might account for part of the difference. According to the apparatus in the 27th edition of the Nestle-Aland Greek New Testament there are something like two dozen variants that can be constructed of Jude 4! The ASV dates back to 1900-1901 and I couldn't find out for sure which ...


5

There are three subjects you touch on: Consistency between different Bible manuscripts Consistency between how any given Bible translation handles the manuscript(s) upon which it is based The nature of infallibility, as it relates to Scripture Consistency between Bible manuscripts The King James translators consulted primarily a set of Greek manuscripts ...


5

According to the Footnotes on the NIV at BibleGateway Jude 1:9 Jude is alluding to the Jewish Testament of Moses The text of this book, also known as the Assumption of Moses or Ascension of Moses, has been lost to time and no manuscripts of it remain. However, Origen of Alexandria commented on it in Book III, Chapter 2 of De principiis stating: We ...


5

So if we try to understand Scripture from a traditional sense the Bible doesn't exactly make sense. So in order to understand Scripture accurately we have to allow the Scripture itself to interpret Scripture, rather than traditional religious beliefs. For The Hebrew text we have three locations mentioned, Sheol, Theum and Hinnom. In the Greek we know these ...


5

Sometimes our viewpoint of the first century church is badly skewed by our Bible-centric approach to faith. We don't intuitively understand how the first generations of church functioned without what we consider to be an essential component of Christian belief. In essence, we need to understand why we have a New Testament at all: the reason these texts were ...


4

Jude 1:8-13 (DRB) In like manner these men also defile the flesh, and despise dominion, and blaspheme majesty. 9 When Michael the archangel, disputing with the devil, contended about the body of Moses, he durst not bring against him the judgment of railing speech, but said: The Lord command thee. 10 But these men blaspheme whatever things they know not: and ...


4

Plese have a look at different other translations too. For instance the ESV (likewise ISV, GNT, NLT, etc.) is rendering: Jude 1:3 ... the salvation we share... (ESV) for ... τῆς κοινῆς ἡμῶν σωτηρίας ... The greek "κοινῆς" (koines) means "common" in the sense of something being shared among a number of individuals, of something belonging to a ...


4

If the question is asking whether the Holy Spirit validated Enoch 1 because Jude wrote ‘under the inspiration of the Spirit’ - then this can’t be done exegetical. It can only be argued. It becomes an academic exercise. Enoch 1 was accepted by the Jews living at the time Jude wrote this letter. Peter also references Enoch 1. These writers, the apostles knew ...


3

Yes, and Yes (though marriage doesn't figure in either passage). Jude wrote that those among the saints who are perverting the gospel have been designated for condemnation (v.4), and he gave three examples of groups who have already faced that end: those who were saved from Egypt but did not believe (v.5); angels who had sex with human women (v.6); and “...


3

The chart seems useless; e.g., Does it distinguish class from class, or individual from individual ? Well, is archangel a class, or is it an individual ? Since this is more or less what we are trying to find out, we are in danger of entering the fruitlessly incoherent realm of circular reasoning. But let's say that we will choose option (b), in the ...


3

In Bible times, as now, the kiss was a symbol of tender affection. The Greek verb, φιλέω (phileó) means either (BDAG): to have a special interest in someone or something, frequently with focus on close association, have affection for, like, consider someone a friend, eg, Matt 10:37, 3:15, John 16:27, 21:15-17, etc. to kiss as a special indication of ...


3

οἰκητήριον is just habitation, or dwelling place. It's not a difficult word to interpret, and translations like "first estate" are excessively flowery for it. That does not mean that the theological interpretation is simple. In Jude, this is a reference to the well known jewish tradition that angels descended to earth to have sex with women. This ...


2

Though the NIV translates v23, "mercy mixed with fear", the literal Greek says, "mercy in/with fear". Any fisherman will tell you that there is such a thing as a "healthy respect for the sea". This "respect" essentially boils down to being afraid (and rightly so) of what might happen to you or your boat at sea during bad weather. Often what we call "...


2

In Matthew 10:15, Jesus does not say that Sodom and Gommorah were forgiven. Jesus is making the point that the cities that he had visited had no excuse for not repenting, because he had been there. In Luke 12:47-48 Jesus says that those who were given more would be held more accountable. He is referring to servants, but this can still be applied to a ...


2

[Christ] went and proclaimed to the spirits in prison who had formerly disobeyed when the long-suffering of God waited in the days of Noah......God did not spare the angels who sinned but delivered them to gloomy pits, having cast them down to Tartarus, they being kept for judgment; and did not spare the ancient world but guarded Noah...... angels who did ...


2

A better translation is provided by BSB, "Yet in the same way, these dreamers defile their bodies, reject authority, and slander glorious beings." The operative word in Jude 8 is ἐνυπνιαζόμενοι (enupniazomenoi) = "dreamers". The word refers back to V4, "For certain men have crept in among you unnoticed—ungodly ones who were designated long ago for ...


2

I don't think so. Paul is criticising the way in which the Corinthians are praying, Jude is encouraging this type of prayer. Jude specifies that he refers to the Holy Spirit, Paul is talking about the human spirit that somehow becomes separated to the mind (Paul does not encourage this). I think praying in the Holy Spirit means to: Pray according to the ...


2

In 1 Corinthians 14, the context of praying in the spirit is glossolalia. Elsewhere, Paul wrote about praying in the Spirit in Ephesians 6:18 Pray in the Spirit at all times, with every kind of prayer and petition. To this end, stay alert with all perseverance in your prayers for all the saints. This is not necessary glossolalia. Now, let's look at the ...


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