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8

Short Answer The answer has everything to do with Psalms 2 and Jesus' claim to be king. Judas chose to sarcastically betray Jesus, the "supposed Son of God”, with a kiss. His kiss is deeply ironic. As with the soldiers in the crucifixion, He mocks Jesus in his claim to be the rightful king of Israel. Long Answer When Jesus entered Jerusalem on a donkey, ...


8

The Greek word behind remorse/repent is μεταμεληθεὶς, pronounced metameletheis, coming from metamelomai. It is found six times in the New Testament: Matthew 21:29, 32; 27:3; 2 Corinthians 7:8 (twice); and Hebrews 7:21 (quoting from Psalm 110:4 where it translates the Hebrew nacham). It is uniformly translated as "repent" in the KJV. While some may say that ...


8

The Jewish leaders wanted to arrest and kill Jesus quietly because they were afraid of how the people might react. Matthew 26:3-5 says, Then the chief priests and the elders of the people were gathered together in the court of the high priest, named Caiaphas; and they plotted together to seize Jesus by stealth and kill Him. But they were saying, 'Not ...


6

Judas almost surely knew that he was betraying Jesus unto death. Jesus told his disciples numerous times prior to his death that this would happen. Lets look through the book of Matthew. Matthew 16:21 21 From that time Jesus began to show his disciples that he must go to Jerusalem and suffer many things from the elders and chief priests and scribes, ...


5

I would not presume to comment on much of Zechariah's profound prophecy, couched as it is in language that is mysterious and, I suspect, that has given translators problems in expressing it in English. But this much is fairly clear to any reader from Zechariah 11:12,13 in the KJV : So they weighed for my price thirty pieces of silver And the Lord said "...


5

We may not be able to draw a "definite conclusion," as you put it. Jesus certainly spoke to Satan (or more accurately, communicated with Satan) on a number of occasions, particularly when the devil tempted Jesus to step outside his Father's will during Jesus' 40 days in the wilderness. In Luke 4:8 we read, And Jesus answered and said unto him, "Get ...


4

St. John Crysostom gives an insightful commentary on this scene; his conclusion was that it was to convince Judas not to betray Him, to give him occasion to reconsider his intentions freely, and not by compulsion, by offering him a gesture of the uttermost kindness and humility (though God—cf. Phil 2:5-11): ... Let us see also what He does now towards the ...


4

Jesus does not explain on that occasion why He is washing the Apostles' feet, but He tells Peter, What I am doing you do not understand now, but you will know after this (John 13:7). The understanding here is that Jesus was teaching a lesson in humility. Theophylact explains: "You do not yet understand that I am teaching you humility. But after this ...


3

At the end are all the scriptures in the New Testament related to Judas Iscariot. First we should note that these scriptures leave many unanswered questions about Judas. If God thought the answers to these questions were important, he would have revealed them to us. Other scriptures that give us a hint are the temptation to worship Satan: Again, the ...


3

Because Judas was spiritually dead, thus as good as dead physically. Notice how the one who died was the one betrayed Jesus. Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers (12) While I was with them in the world.—Comp. the opening words of John 17:11. During His presence with them there was not this special need for commending them to the Father’s care. His ...


3

Did Judas know? John 6:64 KJV reveals: But there are some of you that believe not. For Jesus knew from the beginning who they were that believed not, and who should betray him. (My emphasis) So, was Judas merely a Mr. nice guy who made a mistake, then afterward repented of that little kiss? Not according to verse 70 (in that same context): Jesus answered ...


3

What is interesting is that before attending the Last Supper, "Satan entered Judas" (Luke 22:3). Jesus knew that Satan had implanted the betrayal in the heart of Judas (John 13:2), and proceeded to wash the feet of Judas anyway. Then again before the Last Supper ended, "Satan entered Judas" (Jn 13:27). So what is puzzling is why someone who was possessed by ...


2

2Wherefore I praised the dead which are already dead more than the living which are yet alive.3Yea, better [is he] than both they, which hath not yet been, who hath not seen the evil work that is done under the sun.(Eccl. 3:2-3) The author(Solomon) is declaring that "better is the one who is dead, than the one who is yet to be born to see the evil". ...


2

The interchange between Jesus and Judas during the Passover celebration is very powerful. The timeline of events during the supper is critical to understand the answer to your question. If proper comparisons are made between the Synoptics and John's Gospel it becomes clear that the foot washing event happened early in the evening. Maybe one of the first ...


2

I think the point about catching him out in private is the key one. Sure, everyone knows where a public person or celebrity is at certain times -- when they make a public appearance. Well, that was when the high priests wanted to avoid doing it. People don't know where those people are on their own time -- not even the media or the government since this is ...


2

3 possibilities come to mind, all of which take as a working assumption that he hung himself from a tree. Nobody actually saw him fall; they just saw the mess on the ground and came to different conclusions about what had happened. His feet got caught in the tree on the way down, causing his body to rotate. He hung himself from high enough up in the tree ...


2

The implication in my mind is that Judas received the Eucharist. Mark's version of the Last Supper, which is essentially the same as Matthew's. 17 When evening came, Jesus arrived with the Twelve. 18 While they were reclining at the table eating, he said, “Truly I tell you, one of you will betray me—one who is eating with me.” 19 They were saddened, and one ...


2

The four evangelists present the four events in a different order: Matthew: Sop, Bread, Wine Mark: Sop, Breadd, Wine Luke: Wine Bread, Sop John: Sop, Judas' departure Notice several things about these accounts: Luke records a different order for taking the bread vs wine John does not record anything about bread and wine Only John records the departure of ...


2

When therefore the chief priests and the attendants saw Him, they cried out, saying, Crucify! Crucify! Pilate said to them, You take Him and crucify Him, for I do not find fault in Him. The Jews answered him, We have a law, and according to that law He ought to die because He made Himself the Son of God. When Pilate therefore heard this word, he became ...


1

PRICE FOR A SLAVE Under the law the price for a slave was thirty pieces of silver,(Exodus 21:32) so the price offered by the chief priest showed their contempt for Jesus. Likewise for Zechariah he was paid this lowly sum, suggesting that he was not worth more than the price of a slave. According to Law given to Moses by God ( Exodus 21:32) the price for a ...


1

Judas had fixed the deal to betray Jesus. At the table, when Jesus announced that one of them was going to betray him Judas was troubled, he feared getting caught. If Jesus was not captured, Judas's very own life was in danger by betraying the Jewish theocracy. There was fear in Judas' heart. Was his cover blown? Should he return the money? Should he keep it?...


1

A 'Kiss' To begin with, this is probably closer to the French faire la bise than a 'kiss on the cheek' proper. φιλημα, coming from the primitive verb φιλεω ("to love/have fondness for") means "love-gesture" put simply (a show of love, such as any kind of embrace, hug, or kiss proper). It is far more likely something like this than what we call a 'kiss.' In ...


1

In my eyes, Judas' kiss is a picture of their friendship. Hence, Jesus says "Do what you came for, friend." This idea of friendship and brotherhood placed side by side with the betrayal aspect amplifies the hurt and pain Jesus would feel and go on to feel later on. (Although, the ultimate pain was when God the Father turns His face away from Jesus, Jesus ...


1

Before answering this question, one has to define what does repentance mean and how it differs from the remorse. If in repentance is understood the Greek term μετανοία, then its significance is to "change one's mind", to alter the entire vision upon reality, to see reality in a new light. Thus, it is not so much a psychological state, than an intellectual ...


1

I have been reading around this and studying this question too. I think Judas' betrayal happened a long time before this event in many small but accumulative ways. He had already betrayed Him in his heart many times before this final event. We are told he was a thief and took money from the common purse. He was choosing Mammon over Jesus every time he did ...


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