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16

Joseph's sons were Ephraim and Manasseh, Gen. 41:51 Joseph called the name of the firstborn Manasseh: “For God has made me forget all my toil and all my father’s house.” Gen. 41:52 And the name of the second he called Ephraim: “For God has caused me to be fruitful in the land of my affliction.” These became, in a sense, Jacob's sons: Gen. 48:5 And now ...


14

I regret that I do not have access to the article by Johnston, but I understand his gist from Susan’s answer. First of all, the argument that “research has failed to turn up any evidence for the use of eunuchs as officials in Egypt” is likely to convince only those who believe that the story of Joseph is an authentic record of historic events. It will not ...


13

The word used to describe Potiphar's relationship with Pharaoh (37:36, 39:1) is sārı̂s, which is indeed commonly glossed "eunuch" (e.g. BDB; cf. LXX εὐνοῦχος). However, to my knowledge no major English translation, including the KJV, translates it thus in this pericope (rather "officer" or "official"). There are several reasons for this, but perhaps the most ...


12

This is just by way of postscript and supplement to a (good!) answer already provided. The lists of tribes given in the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament typically are as @Niobius describes: Joseph's sons, Ephraim and Manasseh, replace both Joseph and Levi, most obviously in the tribal settlements during the "conquests" of Joshua/Judges. This is also how they ...


8

A chaism is a structure common in the Old Testament (but also found in the New Testament). It is basically text constructed in an ABCBA or ABCDCBA (or etc.) pattern. For instance, consider Luke 4 A v1-4: Jesus tempted to exercise his power over the physical world to be fed -B v5-8: Jesus tempted to usurp authority over the world --C v9-13: Jesus ...


7

Textual Breakdown In Genesis 50:22 the text literally says: וַיְחִ֣י יוֹסֵ֔ף מֵאָ֥ה וָעֶ֖שֶׂר שָׁנִֽים1 "Joseph lived a hundred and ten years" In v. 26, an idiomatic expression is used to say the same thing. The text of Genesis 50:26 literally says: בֶּן־מֵאָ֥ה וָעֶ֖שֶׂר שָׁנִ֑ים2 "son of a hundred and ten years" This is a common idiom ...


7

The question is predicated on the implicit assumption that Gen 42:8-16 is a complete record of the conversation between Joseph and the 10 brothers. The above assumption is clearly untrue for two reasons: As evidenced by the record in Gen 43:7, 27, and The very common Bible practice of providing a shortened summary of events for the sake of brevity, ...


6

The Hebrew is נחשׁ(nḥš) which is related to sorcery or divination; the Masoretic text here is נָחַשׁ (nā·ḥǎš), which means to practice divination. Other instances: But Laban said to him, “If you will allow me to say so, I have learned by divination that the LORD has blessed me because of you" (Genesis 30:27, RSV) You shall not eat any flesh with the ...


6

How old was Joseph when he was sold into slavery? Joseph was 17 years of age. Genesis 37:1-3 (NASB) Joseph’s Dream 1 Now Jacob lived in the land [a]where his father had sojourned, in the land of Canaan. 2 These are the records of the generations of Jacob. Joseph, when seventeen years of age, was pasturing the flock with his brothers while he was still a ...


5

The Bible places the Exodus around 1440 BCE and therefore Joseph around 1870 BCE. To be able to speak to the pharaohs and the common Egyptian people, Joseph would have needed to speak either Egyptian or a lingua franca known widely enough to be helpful. The Amarna letters may help in this regard, although they are somewhat later, around 1350 BCE. The ...


5

Jacob's blessing on Joseph is full of symbolism. Joseph himself is likened to a fruitful bough of a tree by a spring. The mention of the archers who bitterly attack him and harass him is a figure of speech; it is an oblique reference to how his brothers, who were jealous of Joseph, plotted to have him disposed of. But the 'Mighty One of Jacob'protected ...


5

Joseph was pretending (as a ruse) to make himself look like a typical pagan ruler so as not to raise the suspicions of his brothers. Of course he would claim that he used the special cup for divination. According to Barnes (as per comments in Gen 44:5) and the Cambridge Commentary, such "hydromancy" was common for ancient rulers. However, Joseph ...


5

The difference is rather simple - the total family of Jacob was 70 people. Joseph had two children + Jacob himself were obviously four people. Therefore, we have: (a) 66 people other than Joseph's family and Jacob + (b) four people of Joseph's family + Jacob = 70 people in total. Note the difference in the carefully worded sentences: (a) all the people who ...


4

Joseph's advice to Pharaoh for this warning was to appoint a foreman to prepare for the coming catastrophe. 41:33-36 “So now Pharaoh should look for a wise and discerning man and give him authority over all the land of Egypt. 34 Pharaoh should do this – he should appoint officials throughout the land to collect one-fifth of the produce of the land of ...


4

The commentaries I consulted did not have an authoritative answer nor a convincing suggestion. I suspect that what was being referred to is "scrying": Scrying (Wikipedia) One looks intently at any of a variety of reflective surfaces such as a metal cup, a crystal ball, a chicken's liver, obsidian stone (such as arrow heads), a pond, etc. and interprets the ...


4

Your question cannot be answered from the biblical verses alone, as the nature of this garment is not specified, so we must turn to extra-biblical sources. We know that all Egyptian men (besides for the king and his household) did not wear any clothing besides for a skirt, its length depending on the fashion of the specific period. See image below. This was ...


4

In Gen 37 we have a classic example of ancient trading of slaves who were traded a common property. V28 says that the brothers sold Joseph to Midianite/Ishmaelite traders for 20 shekels of silver:- So when the Midianite traders passed by, his brothers pulled Joseph out of the pit and sold him for twenty shekels of silver to the Ishmaelites, who took him to ...


4

In Genesis 44:5 Joseph told his steward to go after his brothers and charge them with stealing “the cup his master drinks from and also uses for divination.” When Joseph’s brothers were brought back Joseph asked them “Don’t you know that a man like me can find things out by divination?” (NIV) What Joseph said to his brothers was intended to suggest that his ...


3

Joseph had no need for divination, yet he lived in a culture that did. Joseph had to live the life of an Egyptian and most likely pretended the practice of divination. He could interpret dreams as God willed him, which to Egyptians would seem as divination. Then on the other hand God can use anything or anyone to glorify Himself.


3

The most common times chosen for the Exodus are sometime between 2670 BCE and 1759 BCE, during the Reign of Ahmose I who ruled 1539–1514 BCE, during the reign of Amenhotep II who ruled 1427–1401 BC, or 1427–1397 BC. Most scholars believe that it was one of the Pharaohs of the 18th Dynasty The thinking behind these two dates are thus: For the first time ...


3

The Idea in Brief The passage is to be understood in its plain and normal sense. That is, the handmaiden of Rachel was Bilhah, who had borne sons to Jacob on behalf of Rachel. She was thus the surrogate mother of children to Jacob on behalf of Rachel. (Rachel later had her own biological children, Joseph and Benjamin.) When Rachel died at the birth of ...


3

This is indeed a reference to death, but it isn't an idiom. It was the custom to literally close a deceased person's eyes (Mishna Shabbat 23:5): אין מאמצין את המת בשבת, ולא בחול עם יציאת נפש; וכל המאמץ עם יציאת נפש, הרי זה שופך דמים. One may not close a dead person's eyes on the Sabbath, nor on a weekday while the soul is departing; and whoever closes a ...


3

Absolutely. He even commands it. Leviticus 16:6-10 NASB 6 Then Aaron shall offer the bull as the [i]sin offering, which is for himself, so that he may make atonement for himself and for his household. 7 He shall then take the two goats and present them before the LORD at the doorway of the tent of meeting. 8 Aaron shall cast lots for the two goats, one lot ...


3

For some inexplicable reason, the number "five" is a recurring theme in the story of Joseph. Here is a sample: Gen 41:34 - Let Pharaoh appoint commissioners over the land to take a fifth of the harvest of Egypt during the seven years of abundance. Gen 43:34 - When portions were served to them from Joseph's table, Benjamin's portion was five times ...


3

Genesis 41:29 Seven years of great abundance are coming throughout the land of Egypt, 30 but seven years of famine will follow them. Joseph was extremely useful to Pharoah during the 7 years and plenty and the 7 years of famine, so he was the 2nd in command after only Pharoah. However, it was some years after the end of the famine that Jacob died. Genesis ...


3

Genesis 39:20 says that Potiphar put Joseph into the prison where the king’s prisoners were confined. The NIV Study Bible makes this comment: Potiphar put Joseph in the “house of the captain of the guard” (40:3) – certainly not the worst prison available. There is no information to back that up. However, the ESV Study Bible makes this comment: The law ...


3

The short answer is no. It means the same thing. In other words God is with "him/us" by dealing with us as a people and individually. Even when God is not with "us" He is still involved with us. Case and point is at Exodus 33:3, "Go up to a land flowing with milk and honey; for I will NOT go up in your midst, because (or why?) you ...


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