12

The central matter here in John 1:15 is the meaning ascribed to the adjective πρῶτος (protos) which can mean: of time - first in time, earliest or earlier, eg, Phil 1:5, Acts 20:18 first in a sequence of list, eg, Matt 21:28, 22:25, etc most prominent, foremost, most important, eg, Matt 22:38, Mark 12:29, etc. Before answering this question we should ...


10

Practical Elizabeth and Zecharia were of the priestly Levitical tribe. They lived in the hill country of Judah, probably at Hebron. Joseph and Mary were of the children of Israel in the tribe of Judah. After traveling and living in Egypt, they returned and lived in Galilee in the city Nazareth. The two towns were about 100 miles apart. Walking at 10 miles/...


8

The short answer is, because he ate "locusts and wild honey" (Mt 3:4; Mk 1:6). The slightly longer explanation is that John the Baptist lived a simple life (Lk 7:25) in the wilderness, where he was called from (Lk 3:2) and in which he ministered (Mt 3:1; Mk 1:4; Lk 7:24). Thus he lived off the land by eating these insects for protein, fat, and nutrients (as ...


8

Two reasons barrenness was undesirable In antiquity there were typically two reasons that barrenness was undesirable. The first, which isn't really an issue in this text had to do with the security of the future. Children were the ancient equivalent of a retirement plan since there were no pensions, social security, etc. Therefore, the only ones to care for ...


7

We can only take the literal meaning of the word of the word we find in the text. Wherever a word can have two meanings it should generally be read as normally used in the Greek language. The word used in both Matthew and Mark is ἀκρίς which translates as grasshopper.


6

Tertulian (being a Roman) would have used a Roman calendar system of dating reigns of emperors. So, the part year of AD 14 would have been considered Tiberius' accession, and AD 15 would have been year 1, and so on. Hence the Lord would have been revealed in AD 26. It would have referred to his baptism in the year that John began baptising, and by the time ...


6

There are several questions lying beneath the surface of this question: 1) Is it 'conclusive' that the Qumran Scrolls are the work of the Essenes? Scholars are generally in agreement with this conclusion, and cite the "Damascus Document", discovered in Cairo in 1897, or prior to the Qumran scrolls which depict the life of the Essene, the vows they had to ...


5

The Hebrew Bible makes mention that Elijah will appear before the "great and terrible day of the Lord" (Mal 4:5). That is, Elijah was to turn the hearts of Israel for healing (Mal 4:6). The Hebrew Bible makes mention that "the voice in the wilderness" was to prepare the way before the coming of the Lord (Is 40:3). John the Baptist claimed to be this voice (...


5

In the larger context of the Matthew passage you cite (11:1-20), Jesus' focus is on John the Baptizer and John's ministry as Messiah's forerunner (see also Mark 1 and Luke 3). John's commission from God was to prepare the way for the Lord, and in essence John's message was a message (and baptism) of repentance. The common people flocked to John, and John had ...


5

This is going to sound a little esoteric, but my belief is that He was doing things backwards compared to the way we do them to symbolize His coming to us. The way we come to God, we first come to the faith, and then accept His sacrifice. Afterwards we get baptized, and then the Holy Spirit tabernacles with us. I'm using this language for a reason. It's the ...


5

It’s interesting to me that you say And, if so, please, explain why they were as great as John the Baptizer As though you are anticipating the answer to be yes? Of Samuel and of Samson it is not said as of John the Baptizer “For he will be great in the sight of the Lord; and he will drink no wine or liquor, and he will be filled with the Holy Spirit while ...


4

Many commentaries suggest that "the other disciple" appears to have been John (that is, the author of the same Gospel). Some hold the view the disciple perhaps may have been Philip, or Thomas. The identity of the second of the Baptizer’s disciples is not mentioned in this pericope. Naturally a great deal of speculation has arisen as a result of this ...


4

One thing is sure – Augustus died in AD 14 and Tiberius succeeded him. From that anchor point, we must resolve the ‘contradiction’ between Luke and Tertulian by concluding that: Either Luke or Tertulian was mistaken, (or) Both are right, but they begin counting from different start-points. I believe the latter option - Tertulian counts from AD 14, and ...


4

I have found it quite difficult to find any commentaries, ancient or modern, that state that the "us" is not Jesus and John the Baptist. Your question however has challenged me to look outside my orthodoxy, and so I present two interpretations: 1. Jesus was referring to himself and John the Baptist First, Jesus himself had to be baptised, and he was aware ...


4

John was not saying that he did not recognize Jesus as the Messiah in the way that we do not perceive or recognize a person's identity, like an old acquaintance or relative, but instead that Jesus had received recognition not from him (John), but from heaven that he (Jesus) was the Christ. The Greek word εἴδω is used the same way that we use the word "...


4

Abstract John is not part of the Kingdom of Heaven because his role is to point to and prepare the way for it. Jesus is speaking in the language of eschatology and not in the framework of modern Christian theology. The context of the passage is that John has been imprisoned by Herod: Now when John heard in prison about the deeds of the Christ, he sent ...


4

The Gospels tell us that the word of God came unto John in the wilderness (Luke 3:2), sometime around the year 28 or 29 AD (the fifteenth year of the reign of Tiberius Caesar; Luke 3:1). They do not tell us when John first left for the wilderness - only that he had already been in the wilderness when the word of God came upon him. Some early Church Fathers ...


4

And the same John had his raiment of camel's hair, and a leathern girdle about his loins; and his meat was locusts and wild honey. [Matthew 3:4 KJV] John's way of life and especially his years in the wilderness are hinted at in the very brief description giving by Matthew of John's clothing and diet. The word for camel, gamal, in Hebrew is a homonym and ...


3

The text says nothing about confusion or doubt. John knew from his infancy that Jesus was the promised Messiah. He knew from Jesus' baptism that He was also the God's Son, the King. But kings, messiahs, never do miracles. As Frank says, many Jews interpreted the prophecies to mean that both a new David and a new Moses would come. But was Jesus also the new ...


3

Lk 1:57, where Elizabeth gives birth, comes after Lk 1:56, where Mary leaves. Though this in itself is not conclusive evidence that Mary left before John was born, it is an indication. Furthermore, Lk 1:58-36 talk about how Elizabeth's neighbors reacted, and how her relatives who had just heard the good news reacted, and how Zachariah reacted - there is ...


3

The verse is simply saying the law (meaning the Torah, the first 5 books of the OT where prophecies of Christ can be found) as well as the prophets (meaning the prophets of OT where prophecies of Christ can also be found) foretold of a day when the Messiah would arrive. "until John" The ministry of the law & prophets foretelling a Messiah who was to ...


3

Luke 7:28 I tell you, among those born of women there is no one greater than John; yet the one who is least in the kingdom of God is greater than he. Jesus is using John as a demarcation in terms of space and time for Jesus' Kingdom of God. I don't think we should place too much weight on the words "greater" or "least" as they applied to ...


3

‘Born’ and ‘Come’ of women ‘Born’ of women in Matthew 11:11, regarding the entering into the world of John the Baptist, his parents Zacharias and Elizabeth, is the translation of the word gennetois (see also Luke 7:28) which Liddell & Scott [American Edition 1854] say is derived from gennaw (the ‘w’ is omega, a long ‘o’). Bible hub says that gennetois ...


3

I believe the King James and Young's Literal versions are more clear. Matthew 3:7 (KJV): But when he saw many of the Pharisees and Sadducees come to his baptism, he said unto them, O generation of vipers, who hath warned you to flee from the wrath to come? The KJV states that they came to his (John's) baptism, most likely due to curiosity. In verse ...


3

According to Luke 1:26, John was conceived 6 months before Jesus, so Jesus and John were about the same age. And according to Luke 3:23, Jesus was about 30 years old after his baptism. Since presumably John was imprisoned after Jesus' baptism, that would make him about 30 or older when he was imprisoned and killed. And since he died before Jesus, he would ...


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