12

Looking at the texts of Deuteronomy 24 and Jeremiah 3, I'd suggest the key aspect of these verses are divorce: "...her first husband, who divorced her, is not allowed to marry her again after she has been defiled" (Dt 24:4) "If a man divorces his wife and she leaves him and marries another man, should he return to her again? Would not the ...


9

The verse is Hebrew poetry. Hebrew poetry isn't like English poetry, relying on rhyme and meter. Instead Hebrew poetry relies on parallels and rhythm of ideas. This site already has an answer with the basics of Hebrew poetry. The second line of a couplet will restate the first in a slightly different manner. This verse has a triplet. How is Sheshach taken! ...


9

By way of supplementing and extending the answers already provided for this question: As noted elsewhere in this Q&A, the kingdom that was united under the thrones of Saul, David, and Solomon, split in the aftermath of Solomon's reign into distinct "nations": one in the north, and one in the south (narrated in 1 Kings 12). When the two designations "...


7

The BHS of Jeremiah was edited by Wilhelm Rudolph, a distinguished Alttestamentler, and the author of several important commentaries -- among them, a commentary on Jeremiah. It was first published in 1958, with the last edition being the third which appeared in 1968. His BHS edition of Jeremiah was published in 1970. As OP notes, Rudolph suggests hayyôm ["...


6

Verse 33 explains what’s going on: ולא ילמדו עוד איש את־רעהו ואיש את־אחיו לאמר דעו את־ה׳; כי־כולם ידעו אותי למקטנם ועד־גדולם נאם-ה׳ כי אסלח לעונם ולחטאתם לא אזכר־עוד׃ and they shall teach no more every man his neighbor, and every man his brother, saying: ‘Know the LORD’; for they shall all know Me, from the least of them unto the greatest of them, ...


6

Scripture comments after Michal despised David for his exuberance at the bringing in of the ark (2 Samuel 6:20-23) : Therefore Michal the daughter of Saul had no child unto the day of her death. [2 Samuel 6:23 KJV] Scripture does not say that Michal was barren. Only that 'therefore', that is to say as a result of her attitude and words, she had no child. ...


6

Originally the ancient Hebrew pronunciation of "jeremiah" was Yirmeyahu יִרְמְיָ֖הוּ ben cHilqiyahu בֶּן־חִלְקִיָּ֑הוּ . The last letter of Yirmeyahu ( יִרְמְיָ֖הוּ ) is vav with Shuruk making an "u" sound. - During Babylonian exile, Hebrews were forced to speak Aramaic which abbreviated names like Yirmeyahu-to-Yirmeyah & Yehoshua-to-...


5

The Bible Forgery URL states that Jeremiah 8:8 should be translated as: “How can you people say ‘We are the experts, for we have the Lord’s Bible,’ when behold, like a forgery, the pen has been manipulated by dishonest Bible copiers!” (Jeremiah 8:8) You're right that is far from the common interpretation. Most English translations have something along the ...


5

First, let me put into context that "new covenant" as used in Jeremiah does not mean a covenant that replaces an "old covenant." When we speak of "the Covenant" we are usually talking about the one between the Jewish people and God made at Mt. Sinai. But that covenant was not the first, nor the last covenant between G-d and the Jewish people. See, e.g. Gen....


5

Nebuchadnezzar did God service when he besieged Jerusalem in 605 BC and The Lord gave Jehoiakim into his hand, with part of the vessels of the house of God, Daniel 1:2 and II Kings 24:1. Nebuchadnezzar did God service when he fell upon his face and gave homage to Daniel and said : your God is a God of gods and a Lord of kings, Daniel 2:47. Nebuchadnezzar ...


5

Every Servant is under authority: It is the core definition "Let every soul be subject to the governing authorities. For there is no authority except from God, and the authorities that exist are appointed by God." (Romans 13:1) "And the devil said to Him, “All this authority I will give You, and their glory; for this has been delivered to me, ...


5

No. The point of a "chiastic" structure is that there is some clear relationship between the matched and mirrored elements in the structure. Normally this is lexical (i.e., a repeated word), or closely related concepts. But in the example given, there simply is no "match" between the a-a′, b-b′, and c-c′ elements. This is either a bad example of chiasm (...


5

The passage from Jeremiah in context, is completely accurate: 21 Thus says the LORD of hosts, the God of Israel: “Add your burnt offerings to your sacrifices, and eat the flesh. 22 For in the day that I brought them out of the land of Egypt, I did not speak to your fathers or command them concerning burnt offerings and sacrifices. 23 But this command I gave ...


5

You bet there's a reason: omitting it would be ignoring the Hebrew. -enu is the first-person plural possessive suffix for a noun in the singular. Sounds like a lot, but it boils down to adding "our" to a singular noun like "righteousness". וְזֶה־שְּׁמ֥וֹ אֲ‍ֽשֶׁר־יִקְרְא֖וֹ יְהוָ֥ה צִדְקֵֽנוּ׃ And this is his name that (one) will call him: YHWH Our ...


5

I think it is best to look at the idea/context, rather than strictly the words themselves, as it seems that this is one of those passages where the Hebrew does not translate easily into English. Here is the Darby version, which I find best translates: and they have built the high places of Baal, to burn their sons in the fire as burnt-offerings unto ...


4

The words apply to the idols. In reading this in English translation, the KJV is obscure, although with some effort you can read it as having this meaning; the NIV is much better: "Like a scarecrow in a cucumber field, their idols cannot speak; they must be carried because they cannot walk ..." The NAB is clear and gives us the picture Jeremiah had in mind. ...


4

This answer offers a subtle but significant adjustment to Joseph's helpful offering. OP's main question is: Why is the masculine pronoun "him" used to describe Israel in this passage? The central answer to this question is that "Israel" is always "masculine, singular" in biblical Hebrew. One of the basic studies of this phenomenon is by J.J. Schmitt, ...


4

While the Torah may or may not be in one-for-one in format of a Ketubah, there are many similarities between a Jewish wedding and when the Israelite received the Torah. In this "wedding," the Torah would take the place of the Ketubah and this would be a basis for understanding the Torah as being a Ketubah. What is important to remember however is that the ...


4

Preamble Without vowel markings the Hebrew word for "almond" and one of their words for "watch" look the same, שקד. With the vowel markings, almond is שָׁקֵ֖ד (šā-qêḏ), and "watch" is שֹׁקֵ֥ד (šō-qêḏ). In the days prior to vowel markings, those who read the text would have had to have heard it read to them with the distinctive vowel sounds, otherwise the ...


4

Quoting from John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible, "What seems best to solve this difficulty, is, that the order of the books of the Old Testament is not the same now, as it was formerly: the sacred writings were divided, by the Jews, into three parts: the first was called the law, which contains the five books of Moses; the second, the prophets, ...


4

Remember the superlatives and use of hyperbole by the Eastern poetry, expressing the feelings of the heart in strong imagery. Jeremiah suffered many persecutions, and rejection by the people he was calling to return to God. In chap. 20, he had just been beaten and put in the stocks (vs. 2), mocked by those he warned (vs. 7), reproached and derided for ...


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