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8

The verbs וּשְׁמָרַנִי (ushmarani) and וְנָתַן (venatan) have the appearance of verbs conjugated in the perfect aspect and would therefore be translated into English in the past tense, i.e., “and he protected me” and “he gave me,” respectively. The reason I say “they have the appearance” is because a verb conjugated in the perfect aspect, and a vav-...


7

The question is predicated on the implicit assumption that Gen 42:8-16 is a complete record of the conversation between Joseph and the 10 brothers. The above assumption is clearly untrue for two reasons: As evidenced by the record in Gen 43:7, 27, and The very common Bible practice of providing a shortened summary of events for the sake of brevity, ...


6

There is a lot more going on here than is implied in the OP's question. But first a simple principle of divine providence and grace. PRINCIPLE In John 11, when Jesus raised Lazarus (one of the greatest and most spectacular evidences of divine power!!), Jesus asked that men roll the stone away from the grave. Jesus could have done this by the same power ...


5

This is hermeneutic approach to theatre and drama. This is the scene when the hero and heroine meet for the first time, picturesque and romantic. It should make your heart beat just a little bit faster when you read this passage. Genesis 29:1 Then Jacob continued on his journey and came to the land of the eastern peoples. Jacob, our hero, is different from ...


5

Jacob's blessing on Joseph is full of symbolism. Joseph himself is likened to a fruitful bough of a tree by a spring. The mention of the archers who bitterly attack him and harass him is a figure of speech; it is an oblique reference to how his brothers, who were jealous of Joseph, plotted to have him disposed of. But the 'Mighty One of Jacob'protected ...


5

The difference is rather simple - the total family of Jacob was 70 people. Joseph had two children + Jacob himself were obviously four people. Therefore, we have: (a) 66 people other than Joseph's family and Jacob + (b) four people of Joseph's family + Jacob = 70 people in total. Note the difference in the carefully worded sentences: (a) all the people who ...


4

To "bear upon the knees" is a very Hebrew piece of idiom surrounding the birthing custom of the time. When a child was born, it was placed, usually on the knees (in modern terms we say "lap") of the father and mother. Thus, Rachel was essentially saying that any children born to Bilhah would be placed upon Rachel's knees, thus ...


4

That Esau held murderous, revengeful intentions is stated explicitly: Gen 27:41 - Esau held a grudge against Jacob because of the blessing his father had given him. And Esau said in his heart, “The days of mourning for my father are at hand; then I will kill my brother Jacob.” Because Rebekah knew this she sent Jacob away to her brother's (Laban's) family. ...


3

The name "Leah" (לֵאָ֖ה) means 'weary'. - Genesis 29:17 is a Hebrew pun : The eyes of Weary (לֵאָ֖ה) were weak. Genesis 29:17 [MT] "and The eyes of Leah were weak" (וְעֵינֵ֥י לֵאָ֖ה רַכּ֑וֹת) "Eyinei" (עֵינֵ֥י) = Eyes ; "Leah" (לֵאָ֖ה) = Weary ; "Rakhot" (רַכּ֑וֹת) = Weak / Soft. Leah also was "the ...


3

The Hebrew word translated "bless" is simply בָרַךְ (barak) and in almost all cases is just a series of well-wishes for a person. Indeed, the LXX translates this word as εὐλογέω (eulogeo) which is literally, "good words", or, "good thoughts". The word occurs frequently in the OT, eg, Gen 1:22, 28, 2:3, 5:2, 9:1, 26, 12:2, 14:19,...


3

Rebekah knew his son Esau's behavior and predicted his anger would subside: Genesis 27:42 When Rebekah was told what her older son Esau had said, she sent for her younger son Jacob and said to him, “Your brother Esau is planning to avenge himself by killing you. 43Now then, my son, do what I say: Flee at once to my brother Laban in Harran. 44Stay with him ...


2

There is a lot of material out of chronological sequence in much of Genesis, put particularly the last half. Note the following: Isaac born to Abraham when he was 100 yeas old. Gen 21:1-5 Abraham goes to sacrifice Isaac at an unspecified time, Gen 22 Sarah dies at age 127 (Gen 23:1), Abraham is 137, Isaac is 37. Isaac marries Rebekah Gen 24, at age 40, ...


2

As answered above, they do this simply to convince their father Jacob that his son Joseph was killed by a wild animal. However, this act and speech creates a double literary parallelism which brings richness to the text and suggests that Jacob and Judah "reap what they sow": (1) Jacob's sons deceive Jacob through the use of a goat (שְׂעִיר עִזִּים) like Jacob ...


2

The simple answer here is the obvious one - the brothers had sold Joseph to slave traders where he would be possibly abused & later die in unknown places. Such a treacherous act was abhorrent for Jews, especially when done to one's own brother! In order to hide the horrible truth of their actions and their appalling culpability, they decided on an ...


2

Was Jacob so Sexually driven that He mistook Leah for Rachel? No. If he were, he wouldn't have asked to work and wait 7 years. Genesis 29:18 Jacob was in love with Rachel and said, “I’ll work for you seven years in return for your younger daughter Rachel.” So what happened? It was the scheme of Laban. He had a contingency plan for Jacob's wedding night. He ...


2

Genesis 25:29 Once when Jacob was cooking some stew, Esau came in from the open country, famished. 30He said to Jacob, “Quick, let me have some of that red stew! I’m famished!” Esau was impatient and wanted things immediately: I'm so hungry I could eat a horse. He let his appetite rule his brain. 31 Jacob replied, “First sell me your birthright.” 32“Look, ...


2

Jacob was a smooth man, a plain man dwelling in tents. Esau was a hairy man, a hunter, a man of the field. And the boys grew: and Esau was a cunning hunter, a man of the field; and Jacob was a plain man, dwelling in tents. [Genesis 25:27 KJV] And Jacob said to Rebekah his mother, Behold, Esau my brother is a hairy man, and I am a smooth man: [Genesis 27:...


2

Did Jesus intend to reference the Esau/Jacob reunion story, and if so why? Jesus did not intend to reference the Esau / Jacob reunion story in His parable. Every similarity is not a reference. The Prodigal Son is better titled "The Love of the Father" because the whole point of the story is that the father (God) looks for and offers forgiveness ...


2

The actual blessing pronounced by Isaac is recorded in Gen 27:27-29. It is referenced as a single past event in V33, 25, 36, 37. The solution here is as per some of the standard commentaries: The Cambridge Commentary simply says: blessed] Anticipating Genesis 27:26-29. Keil and Delitzsch Biblical Commentary on the Old Testament arrives at a similar ...


2

There is a line between trusting God and testing God. Genesis 32:6 When the messengers returned to Jacob, they said, “We went to your brother Esau, and now he is coming to meet you, and four hundred men are with him.” Horizontally, Jacob saw a threat coming his way. He started to think contingently but not against the word of God. 7 In great fear and ...


2

Jacob is one of the most developed characters in the Bible, and his interaction with God, Laban, and Esau in Gen 31-33 is just one episode from his lifelong demonstration of trust in God while using his savviness. Jesus later advised us to be "as shrewd as snakes and harmless as doves" (Matt 10:16b) and I think Jacob showed us a great example on ...


2

Yes, p. 414 is a bit tricky to read. The key to sorting this out is to make a distinction between repeating a fixed number of times vs repeating indefinitely according to a certain frequency. Waltke and O'Connor argue that in numerical denominatives, the Piel stem carries a nuance of frequency. E.g., the Hebrew word for "tithe" is a numerical ...


1

Did Genesis 36 happen before Genesis 32? Probably not. At the time of Genesis 32:3, he had already acquired some properties in Seir and he was physically there, so the messenger went there. His main possession was still in Canaan as we see later on in Genesis 36:6 Then Esau took his wives, his sons, his daughters, and all his household, and his livestock ...


1

The two trees mention in Gen 12:6 and 35:4 are unlikely to be the same tree as their Hebrew word is different. However, it is more likely that it the same tree mentioned in Judges 9:6, 36 where Joshua condemned idol worship. Note the comments of Ellicott in Gen 35:4 - The oak.—Not Abraham’s oak-grove (Genesis 12:6), referred to probably in Judges 9:6; ...


1

There are two matters here. 1. The Household A lord of a large family household like Jacob would have an entourage of possibly more than 1000 people. It would consist of many more than Jacob's immediate family members such as shepherds, servants, cooks, nurses and all their family members and children. Recall that in Gen 14:14 Abraham raised a small army ...


1

The verb נָסַע (nasa) simply means to pull up and move or journey forward. There is no suggestion in the verb itself as to how long the journey will last. This verb is used often (146 times) in the OT in places like: Gen 11;2, 12:9, 13:11, 20:1, 33;12, 17, 35:5, 16, 17, 46;1, Ex 12:37, 14:10, 15, 19, 15:22, etc. The Hebrew idiom is of one pulling up tent ...


1

This is fairly uncomplicated. In Hebrew idiom, "son" and "daughter" does not necessarily mean the immediate progeny of the person. For example: Luke 13:16 - Then should not this daughter of Abraham, whom Satan has kept bound for eighteen long years, be released from her bondage on the Sabbath day?” Eze 16:48 - As surely as I live, ...


1

The father in Luke 15:20 represents the heavenly Father. Esau does not represent the heavenly Father. On the contrary, Esau and his descendants are punished in Malachi 1:3 but Esau I have hated, and I have turned his hill country into a wasteland and left his inheritance to the desert jackals."


1

Hebrew word is "ילדיו" which is "his offspring" and is male plural. This is basically the masculine plural participle of his "begats." In other contexts this could be more generally pointing to all of his children (including Dinah), but the text seems to imply that it's only speaking about sons since it uses the number 11 ...


1

The Blessing and the Birthright are two different things. The Blessing includes the promise of power and of a future Messiah: The scepter shall not depart from Judah, Nor a lawgiver from between his feet, Until Shiloh comes; And to Him shall be the obedience of the people. — Genesis 49:10 This Blessing was given unconditionally, from God to Abraham to ...


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