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11

Because Jacob encountered God (YHWH) that Night The Meaning of Face to Face The phrase "face to face" in the Hebrew (פָּנִ֣ים אֶל־פָּנִ֔ים) uses the plural form of the word פָּנֶה (paneh; "face").1 However, it would not necessarily be proper to translate it then "faces to faces," because the word is always found in the plural form in Hebrew.2 This is ...


10

There are a lot of implicit, but no explicit reasons why Jacob didn't recognize Leah. Some possibilities: 1.) The feast Laban prepared Throughout history, many men have been known to get themselves quite intoxicated as they enter into their wedding night. Did Jacob do no less? Was he so out of his mind drunk he couldn't tell the difference between Leah and ...


9

Yes, Jacob does mislead his brother. After their dramatic reconciliation in Genesis 33, Jacob resists Esau's invitation to join him in the south (Seir) by: reassuring Esau that he'll follow at a distance, 33:14a, "Let my lord pass on ahead of his servant, and I will lead on slowly,..." only to stop well short of the final destination, 33:17, "But Jacob ...


8

The verbs וּשְׁמָרַנִי (ushmarani) and וְנָתַן (venatan) have the appearance of verbs conjugated in the perfect aspect and would therefore be translated into English in the past tense, i.e., “and he protected me” and “he gave me,” respectively. The reason I say “they have the appearance” is because a verb conjugated in the perfect aspect, and a vav-...


7

The question is predicated on the implicit assumption that Gen 42:8-16 is a complete record of the conversation between Joseph and the 10 brothers. The above assumption is clearly untrue for two reasons: As evidenced by the record in Gen 43:7, 27, and The very common Bible practice of providing a shortened summary of events for the sake of brevity, ...


6

Jacob Jacob is a transliteration of the Hebrew יַעֲקֹב (formal transliteration: yaʿăqob). This labels only one person in the Hebrew Bible: the patriarch also known as Israel, the eponymous ancestor of the twelve tribes. The Septuagint and the Greek New Testament transliterate this word as Ἰακώβ (Iakōb). It most often refers to the patriarch. Once (Matt 1:...


6

There is a lot more going on here than is implied in the OP's question. But first a simple principle of divine providence and grace. PRINCIPLE In John 11, when Jesus raised Lazarus (one of the greatest and most spectacular evidences of divine power!!), Jesus asked that men roll the stone away from the grave. Jesus could have done this by the same power ...


5

No, Vawter is not correct. The Hebrew does likely have two absolute Hebrew word forms next to one another in the construction of הָאֵל֙ בֵּֽית־אֵ֔ל ("the God Bethel"), which can mean an appositional relation ("the God, i.e., Bethel), whereas strictly speaking, "God of Bethel" would have God in a construct form. But Vawter and other such solutions posing ...


5

I don't know what Pharaoh's motivation was for asking, but the information is necessary to piece together the chronology of the Bible Timeline. First, it tells us how many years from the Promise until the Israelites entered Egypt. Abraham was 75 years old at the Promise (Gen. 12:1-5). 25 years later he was 100 when Isaac was born. 60 years later Isaac ...


5

The matter began before what you are describing. When the twins were in her womb, before birth, they struggled together. Rebekah enquired of the Lord, why was it so ? The answer was 'The elder shall serve the younger'. And the children struggled together within her; and she said, If it be so, why am I thus? And she went to enquire of the LORD. Genesis 25:...


5

This is hermeneutic approach to theatre and drama. This is the scene when the hero and heroine meet for the first time, picturesque and romantic. It should make your heart beat just a little bit faster when you read this passage. Genesis 29:1 Then Jacob continued on his journey and came to the land of the eastern peoples. Jacob, our hero, is different from ...


5

Jacob's blessing on Joseph is full of symbolism. Joseph himself is likened to a fruitful bough of a tree by a spring. The mention of the archers who bitterly attack him and harass him is a figure of speech; it is an oblique reference to how his brothers, who were jealous of Joseph, plotted to have him disposed of. But the 'Mighty One of Jacob'protected ...


5

The difference is rather simple - the total family of Jacob was 70 people. Joseph had two children + Jacob himself were obviously four people. Therefore, we have: (a) 66 people other than Joseph's family and Jacob + (b) four people of Joseph's family + Jacob = 70 people in total. Note the difference in the carefully worded sentences: (a) all the people who ...


4

"So that..." Isaac is putting a condition of receiving a meal before he will give the blessing. What isn't so clear from the text is his reasons why. However, there does appear to be some ceremony involved in the proceedings. Ceremonial language Four times in this passage we read "my soul (person) may bless you" or "your soul (person) may bless me." (ch ...


4

It seems likely that Jacob would have given the tithe to God as a burnt offering. In the modern world, we are accustomed to thinking of tithes in terms of currency, but in the ancient Near East, the tithe came from the produce of the land: You shall tithe all the yield of your seed that comes from the field year by year. And before the LORD your God, in the ...


4

The Secularization (and Yahwist Rebranding) of the House of El The purpose of translation is to render into English the intended meaning of the biblical writers. While the ancient etymology of Hebrew words is sometimes interesting, it isn’t always helpful to this task. For example, though Gen.28 tells a story of Jacob’s naming of Bethel, the toponym Bet’...


4

Robert Young writes in his concordance entry for 'Amorite' : Judah, because of her sins, is represented as having an Amorite for a father, a Hittite for a mother, and Samaria and Sodom for sisters. Ezekiel 6: 13, 45 I believe Jacob (Israel) is, here, doing the same, and he is being derogatory in referring to his brother, the Edomite, as an 'Amorite'. ...


4

So the question is "Vawter correct?" is perhaps difficult because all I do not have his book and can neither verify Geir's attribution to him, nor determine what context it is in. But as I see it this question can be answered in parts1) What does the Masoretic Text say. 2) What do the Septuagint say. 3) Are there text critical issues 4) What impact does this ...


4

Why Rebekah wants Jacob to get Esau’s blessing? Let us firstly look at what Scriptures say about the subject. Esau could not have held his birthright in high esteem, for he traded it for a bowl of stew. 24 When her days to give birth were completed, behold, there were twins in her womb. 25 The first came out red, all his body like a hairy cloak, so they ...


4

To "bear upon the knees" is a very Hebrew piece of idiom surrounding the birthing custom of the time. When a child was born, it was placed, usually on the knees (in modern terms we say "lap") of the father and mother. Thus, Rachel was essentially saying that any children born to Bilhah would be placed upon Rachel's knees, thus ...


4

That Esau held murderous, revengeful intentions is stated explicitly: Gen 27:41 - Esau held a grudge against Jacob because of the blessing his father had given him. And Esau said in his heart, “The days of mourning for my father are at hand; then I will kill my brother Jacob.” Because Rebekah knew this she sent Jacob away to her brother's (Laban's) family. ...


3

The Hebrew word תָּם (tām) occurs 13 times in the Hebrew Bible, and appears to suggest peaceableness and originality related to direct and personal relationship to the LORD, since each of the 13 citations in the Bible refers to individuals in this regard. The following citations reinforce this outlook. Philo of Alexandria (1st Cent) Ἰακὼβ ...


3

Rebekah wasn't speaking of Esau and Jacob regarding any justice others may be suggesting. Instead, Rebekah worried about the death of her old husband Isaac, and right after that her son Jacob, because Esau planned to immediately murder the younger Jacob (once their father had died). Rebekah had been very concerned about the way Esau thought and lived, now ...


3

I think it has to do with narrative continuity between verses. The basic idea is that on first mention of the birth of a new character, the prepositional phrase "to Jacob" is elevated to the position immediately following the verb in order to "front" the connection with the prior narrative and delay mention of the new character in the narrative — the ...


3

The Idea in Brief The passage is to be understood in its plain and normal sense. That is, the handmaiden of Rachel was Bilhah, who had borne sons to Jacob on behalf of Rachel. She was thus the surrogate mother of children to Jacob on behalf of Rachel. (Rachel later had her own biological children, Joseph and Benjamin.) When Rachel died at the birth of ...


3

This is indeed a reference to death, but it isn't an idiom. It was the custom to literally close a deceased person's eyes (Mishna Shabbat 23:5): אין מאמצין את המת בשבת, ולא בחול עם יציאת נפש; וכל המאמץ עם יציאת נפש, הרי זה שופך דמים. One may not close a dead person's eyes on the Sabbath, nor on a weekday while the soul is departing; and whoever closes a ...


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