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16

Joseph's sons were Ephraim and Manasseh, Gen. 41:51 Joseph called the name of the firstborn Manasseh: “For God has made me forget all my toil and all my father’s house.” Gen. 41:52 And the name of the second he called Ephraim: “For God has caused me to be fruitful in the land of my affliction.” These became, in a sense, Jacob's sons: Gen. 48:5 And now ...


12

This is just by way of postscript and supplement to a (good!) answer already provided. The lists of tribes given in the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament typically are as @Niobius describes: Joseph's sons, Ephraim and Manasseh, replace both Joseph and Levi, most obviously in the tribal settlements during the "conquests" of Joshua/Judges. This is also how they ...


9

By way of supplementing and extending the answers already provided for this question: As noted elsewhere in this Q&A, the kingdom that was united under the thrones of Saul, David, and Solomon, split in the aftermath of Solomon's reign into distinct "nations": one in the north, and one in the south (narrated in 1 Kings 12). When the two designations "...


9

Gen 22:17 That in blessing I will bless thee, and in multiplying I will multiply thy seed as the stars of the heaven, and as the sand which is upon the sea shore; God promised Abraham that his descendants would be as the sand of the sea, and as the stars of heaven. These two metaphors are in direct apposition to each other, and explain each other. The ...


9

Jesus himself taught an explanation of this in the parable about the wedding feast as found a few chapters later in Matthew: Matthew 22:1-14 And Jesus answering, spoke again in parables to them, saying: The kingdom of heaven is likened to a king, who made a marriage for his son. And he sent his servants, to call them that were invited to the ...


7

The Idea in Brief The "Fulness (sic) of the Gentiles" is the time when Gentile dominion on the earth ends, and the visible theocratic kingdom on earth once again begins. When the theocratic kingdom on earth ended with the departure of the glory of the Lord (before the Babylonian Captivity) as described in the Book of Ezekiel, the Hebrew Bible from that time ...


6

I was listening to a sermon by Voddie Baucham a while ago on exactly this, and thought it was quite interesting, maybe it will be of some help to understand the issue. You can listen to the full thing here: Voddie Baucham - The 144,000 (skip to around minute 26 if you only want to hear the explanation as it pertains to the question). Basically, he says that ...


6

Moses died circa 1406 B.C. In order to understand why Simeon is not mentioned in Deuteronomy, we must go back in time to when Jacob, the father of the twelve sons who were the progenitors of the twelve tribes of Israel, died (circa 1859 B.C.). The record of Jacob’s blessings is in Genesis chapter 49. The relevant section is in verses 5-7: Simeon and ...


6

It is only the men of Shechem and the house of Millo which the text mentions. It is not even a complete tribe. So, therefore, significant though the use of the word 'king' is, the last words in Judges still stand : In those days there was no king in Israel.


5

To clarify the wording of 2 Kings 3:27, although the King James Bible translates this passage as 'indignation, the more common translation is either 'wrath' or 'anger'. For example: 2 Kings 3:27 (NAB): So he took his first-born, his heir apparent, and offered him as a holocaust upon the wall. The wrath against Israel was so great that they gave up the ...


5

Although Niobius' answer is good, it misses a bit of the point. G-d gives a childless Avram two metaphors to understand (a) that he would have a lot of progeny, and (b) that they had both tremendous potential to achieve great heights and also to suffer great lows. First, let me give you a fascinating look into how the Jewish Midrashic tales from the Torah ...


5

This question is great and requires a thoughtful response. I would like to draw your attention to Paul's writings concerning this: What if He did this to make the riches of His glory known to the vessels of His mercy, whom He prepared in advance for glory— including us, whom He has called not only from the Jews, but also from the Gentiles? As He ...


5

After reading commentaries for Judges 20:21, most notably Benson's commentary, I came to this theory: The children of Israel assumed that God wanted them to go up and fight against their brothers the Benjamites by asking "Which of us shall go up first to the battle ...". God then told them to "go up". He did not tell them that He would deliver them into ...


5

Disclaimer I believe that all of physical bloodline Israel will be saved. I however do not agree with the OP’s interpretation that all of Israel means every Israelite. While all of Israel can be interpreted at the individual level to mean every Israelite, it can also be interpreted in a broader sense, all twelve tribes of Israel and the statement “all of ...


4

The Name Israel is the God-bestowed (spiritual) name given to Jacob after he prevailed at Bethel, and the name pertains to the continuation of the promises given to Abraham, passed to Isaac and then taken by Jacob when Isaac passed the birthright blessing to him. Although the names Jacob and Israel may appear to be used more or less interchangeably in ...


4

This answer offers a subtle but significant adjustment to Joseph's helpful offering. OP's main question is: Why is the masculine pronoun "him" used to describe Israel in this passage? The central answer to this question is that "Israel" is always "masculine, singular" in biblical Hebrew. One of the basic studies of this phenomenon is by J.J. Schmitt, ...


4

I believe you are missing the fact that chapters 17 through 21 of the book of Judges are out of chronological sequence. According to the time line provided at BibleHub, the incident recorded in Judges 18, concerning the Danites, happened only about 25 years after the land had been allotted to the tribes. Robert Jamieson says this: The Danites had a ...


4

Updated Answer In my original answer (under this new answer) I mistakenly understood the lost sheep to be a righteous remnant of the northern kingdom. I have learned that instead they were "dead bones" and had to first be gathered by Jesus and his disciples and then be resurrected on Pentecost and up to the return of Christ in 70ad. Israel started ...


4

Why is the tribe of Simeon missing from Deuteronomy 33:1-29? Moses did not mention Simeon by name in his farewell blessing of Israel. This is not to say the tribe was not blessed, for it was included at the end in the general blessing. Deuteronomy 33:29 (NASB) 29 “Blessed are you, O Israel; Who is like you, a people saved by the Lord, Who is the ...


4

In terms of other nations observing a sabbath, this is divided into two questions Which nation observed a seven day week. Once you have the week, you will mark the seventh day as a special day with prescriptions and prohibitons on that day. Indeed, that's what it means to observe a week. Of those required observances, how similar were they to the Mosaic ...


4

The 'prostitution' referenced by Ezekiel is in most senses a reference to idolatry: "They committed adultery with their idols; they even sacrificed their children, whom they bore to me, as food for them." (Ezekiel 23:27) In a secondary sense, it is also a reference to "lust[ing] after the nations" (Ezekiel 23:30b), which we see ...


4

The account of the numbering begins with God's instructions to Moses and to Eleazar, Aaron's son: Take the sum of all the congregation of the children of Israel, from twenty years old and upward, throughout their fathers' house, all that are able to go to war in Israel. (Numbers 26:2) And the summary statement after the numbering is complete, is found here:...


3

The Immediate Context The ESV translation highlights the language a bit better here I feel [I did restructure the second section slightly]: In the first we see Jacob moving out, working for his bride and then guarding her (by guarding sheep). In the next we see God moving in to do the work of bringing Israel out of Egypt, securing Israel as his bride, ...


3

Then the king of Moab took his oldest son, who would have been the next king, and sacrificed him as a burnt offering on the wall. So there was great anger against Israel, and the Israelites withdrew and returned to their own land. (2 Kings 3:27, NLT) I'd interpret this as saying that the king sacrificed his son which then fuelled the rage of the Moabites - ...


3

The simple answer is yes to your question, they are the same. Nebuchadnezzar attacked Jerusalem 3 times and he took captives when he did so. God also promised to keep the captives safe and prosper them. This is Nebuchadnezzar the second who reigned from 605 BC – 562 BC, while Nebuchadnezzar the first reigned from 1126–1103 BC. So there isn't a son with the ...


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