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16

Joseph's sons were Ephraim and Manasseh, Gen. 41:51 Joseph called the name of the firstborn Manasseh: “For God has made me forget all my toil and all my father’s house.” Gen. 41:52 And the name of the second he called Ephraim: “For God has caused me to be fruitful in the land of my affliction.” These became, in a sense, Jacob's sons: Gen. 48:5 And now ...


12

This is just by way of postscript and supplement to a (good!) answer already provided. The lists of tribes given in the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament typically are as @Niobius describes: Joseph's sons, Ephraim and Manasseh, replace both Joseph and Levi, most obviously in the tribal settlements during the "conquests" of Joshua/Judges. This is also how they ...


9

Gen 22:17 That in blessing I will bless thee, and in multiplying I will multiply thy seed as the stars of the heaven, and as the sand which is upon the sea shore; God promised Abraham that his descendants would be as the sand of the sea, and as the stars of heaven. These two metaphors are in direct apposition to each other, and explain each other. The ...


9

Here is the list of 12 tribes of Israel from Genesis, Numbers and Revelation: Genesis 29-30 Numbers 1 Revelation 7 Reuben Reuben Reuben Simeon Simeon Simeon Levi Levi Judah Judah Judah Dan Dan Naphtali Naphtali Naphtali Gad Gad ...


9

Jesus himself taught an explanation of this in the parable about the wedding feast as found a few chapters later in Matthew: Matthew 22:1-14 And Jesus answering, spoke again in parables to them, saying: The kingdom of heaven is likened to a king, who made a marriage for his son. And he sent his servants, to call them that were invited to the ...


7

By way of supplementing and extending the answers already provided for this question: As noted elsewhere in this Q&A, the kingdom that was united under the thrones of Saul, David, and Solomon, split in the aftermath of Solomon's reign into distinct "nations": one in the north, and one in the south (narrated in 1 Kings 12). When the two designations "...


7

It may likely grow into the Sinapis Nigra (Black Mustard). It can grow to eight feet tall, so it could actually be literally used by small birds to nest on its branches. However parables are not to be taken so literally and the image may be a slight exaggeration as part in parcel with the point of the passage. In the OT mustard is not mentioned. Yet later ...


6

Meaning of κόκκῳ σινάπεως This is more or less just some additional information, Mike's answer is good. According to the IVP NT Commentary series: Scholars still dispute what plant is meant by the “mustard seed.” Nevertheless, by no conjecture is it the smallest of all seeds that Jesus’ listeners could have known (the orchid seed is smaller); the ...


6

I was listening to a sermon by Voddie Baucham a while ago on exactly this, and thought it was quite interesting, maybe it will be of some help to understand the issue. You can listen to the full thing here: Voddie Baucham - The 144,000 (skip to around minute 26 if you only want to hear the explanation as it pertains to the question). Basically, he says that ...


6

The Idea in Brief The "Fulness (sic) of the Gentiles" is the time when Gentile dominion on the earth ends, and the visible theocratic kingdom on earth once again begins. When the theocratic kingdom on earth ended with the departure of the glory of the Lord (before the Babylonian Captivity) as described in the Book of Ezekiel, the Hebrew Bible from that time ...


5

Although Niobius' answer is good, it misses a bit of the point. G-d gives a childless Avram two metaphors to understand (a) that he would have a lot of progeny, and (b) that they had both tremendous potential to achieve great heights and also to suffer great lows. First, let me give you a fascinating look into how the Jewish Midrashic tales from the Torah ...


5

To clarify the wording of 2 Kings 3:27, although the King James Bible translates this passage as 'indignation, the more common translation is either 'wrath' or 'anger'. For example: 2 Kings 3:27 (NAB): So he took his first-born, his heir apparent, and offered him as a holocaust upon the wall. The wrath against Israel was so great that they gave up the ...


5

This question is great and requires a thoughtful response. I would like to draw your attention to Paul's writings concerning this: What if He did this to make the riches of His glory known to the vessels of His mercy, whom He prepared in advance for glory— including us, whom He has called not only from the Jews, but also from the Gentiles? As He ...


5

Disclaimer I believe that all of physical bloodline Israel will be saved. I however do not agree with the OP’s interpretation that all of Israel means every Israelite. While all of Israel can be interpreted at the individual level to mean every Israelite, it can also be interpreted in a broader sense, all twelve tribes of Israel and the statement “all of ...


4

The Hebrew word ישׂראל iysra’el; comes from two root words. The first is שׂרה sara,'to prevail' or have dominion. The second is אל ’el usually translated as God. The idea is that the name reflects the wrestling that Jacob had with God. The only question before us is the 'prevailing' and 'wrestling unto prevail' God's over Jacob or Jacob's over God? ...


4

The phenomenon described in II Kings 3:20-23 is well known in the area. Rain can fall in the higher areas such as Edom (now Jordan) or in the Judean hills while down in the Jordan valley on either side of the river, the sky is clear and sunny. When this happens, the wadis (gulleys) that drain the uplands erupt suddenly in flash floods that endanger ...


4

This answer offers a subtle but significant adjustment to Joseph's helpful offering. OP's main question is: Why is the masculine pronoun "him" used to describe Israel in this passage? The central answer to this question is that "Israel" is always "masculine, singular" in biblical Hebrew. One of the basic studies of this phenomenon is by J.J. Schmitt, ...


4

I think this parable means something totally different. A previous parable about the Parable of the Sower explains the 'birds' as the evil ones (Matt 13:19). Idioms in the Bible are consistent. Therefore, the mustard seeds starts in faith then something happens (false teaching - birds being evil ones, false preaching) and it becomes something that it was not ...


4

I believe you are missing the fact that chapters 17 through 21 of the book of Judges are out of chronological sequence. According to the time line provided at BibleHub, the incident recorded in Judges 18, concerning the Danites, happened only about 25 years after the land had been allotted to the tribes. Robert Jamieson says this: The Danites had a ...


4

Updated Answer In my original answer (under this new answer) I mistakenly understood the lost sheep to be a righteous remnant of the northern kingdom. I have learned that instead they were "dead bones" and had to first be gathered by Jesus and his disciples and then be resurrected on Pentecost and up to the return of Christ in 70ad. Israel started ...


4

After reading commentaries for Judges 20:21, most notably Benson's commentary, I came to this theory: The children of Israel assumed that God wanted them to go up and fight against their brothers the Benjamites by asking "Which of us shall go up first to the battle ...". God then told them to "go up". He did not tell them that He would deliver them into ...


4

It is only the men of Shechem and the house of Millo which the text mentions. It is not even a complete tribe. So, therefore, significant though the use of the word 'king' is, the last words in Judges still stand : In those days there was no king in Israel.


3

Then the king of Moab took his oldest son, who would have been the next king, and sacrificed him as a burnt offering on the wall. So there was great anger against Israel, and the Israelites withdrew and returned to their own land. (2 Kings 3:27, NLT) I'd interpret this as saying that the king sacrificed his son which then fuelled the rage of the Moabites - ...


3

The Name Israel is the God-bestowed (spiritual) name given to Jacob after he prevailed at Bethel, and the name pertains to the continuation of the promises given to Abraham, passed to Isaac and then taken by Jacob when Isaac passed the birthright blessing to him. Although the names Jacob and Israel may appear to be used more or less interchangeably in ...


3

It is important to look at this passage as a whole and to consider what is going on in it. Zechariah 12:10-14 “And I will pour out on the house of David and the inhabitants of Jerusalem a spirit of grace and pleas for mercy, so that, when they look on me, on him whom they have pierced, they shall mourn for him, as one mourns for an only child, and weep ...


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