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30

Abraham told his servants that He and Isaac would return because He knew that God could raise Isaac from the dead. Heb. 11:17-19, "17 By faith Abraham hath offered up Isaac, being tried, and the only begotten he did offer up who did receive the promises, 18 of whom it was said -- `In Isaac shall a seed be called to thee;' 19 reckoning that even out of ...


16

The answer is simple: Abraham was hiding his true intentions from Isaac - were he to know what he was trying to do with him he would surely protest. This is evident from verses 7-9: The fire and wood are here,” Isaac said, “but where is the lamb for the burnt offering?” Abraham answered, “God himself will provide the lamb for the burnt offering, my son.”...


12

The phrase appears not only in Gen 31:42: MT ... אֱלֹהֵי אָבִי אֱלֹהֵי אַבְרָהָם וּפַחַד יִצְחָק ... = ... ʾĕlōhê ʾābî ʾĕlōhê ʾābrāhām ûpaḥad yiṣḥāq ... LXX ... ὁ θεὸς τοῦ πατρός μου Αβρααμ καὶ ὁ φόβος Ισαακ ... = ... ho theos tou patros mou Abraam kai ho phobos Isaak ... but also in a slightly variant form a few verses later, in v. 53: ESV ... ...


6

Was this a standard way to prepare a sacrifice? No. The verb used to describe the binding of Isaac is ʿqd, a term used only here in the Hebrew Bible. There are other terms that could be used to describe a similar action, but none of them is used to describe the preparation of the burnt offering, related most elaborately in Leviticus 1.1 There the basic ...


6

Gen 22: 5 calls Isaac, "na'ar" in Hebrew, (English transl. for 'lad') "From na'ar; (concretely) a boy (as active), from the age of infancy to adolescence; by implication, a servant; also (by interch. Of sex), a girl (of similar latitude in age) -- babe, boy, child, damsel (from the margin), lad, servant, young (man)." http://biblehub.com/hebrew/5289.htm ...


5

The gamal refers to both two-humped camels and dromedaries. If you are referring to the same archaeology studies I have looked at, some things need to be born in mind when applying it to the Biblical record and Abraham. Archaeologists claim domesticated dromedaries were unknown in the land based on dromedary bones not being found prior to the end of the ...


5

In Gershon Hepner's “The Affliction and Divorce of Hagar Involves Violations of the Covenant and Deuteronomic Codes”1 he claims that the key to Sarah’s demand ostensibly lies in a clause in Lipit-Ishtar where it is stipulated that if the father grants freedom to a slave woman and the children she has borne him they forfeit their share of the paternal ...


4

While I like various points from a number of highly upvoted answers here, I do not feel any one of them captures the whole picture, so I'll offer a compilation of what I see as the primary points to answer the question itself, some of which will obviously overlap certain of these other answers. Possibilities Are these mistranslations of the original? It ...


4

At the time of Abraham's calling to sacrifice his only son Gen. 22:2, Isaac was his only son. In the previous chapter at Gen. 21:9-12, Ishmael had already been cast out; Hagar was raising him. It is in Isaac that Abraham's seed was defined, called, identified, proclaimed, (Strong's H7121). "Wherefore she said unto Abraham, Cast out this bondwoman and ...


4

"So that..." Isaac is putting a condition of receiving a meal before he will give the blessing. What isn't so clear from the text is his reasons why. However, there does appear to be some ceremony involved in the proceedings. Ceremonial language Four times in this passage we read "my soul (person) may bless you" or "your soul (person) may bless me." (ch ...


4

Yes, actually there is. The original meaning in the Hebrew was one of glory, not of leading astray. We think of testing or tempting someone as being an attempt to trick or cause to stumble. But, that was not the meaning. God does not cause us to stumble. The translation in Young's is: "And it cometh to pass after these things that God hath tried ...


4

A reference from John to Genesis based on the Tanakh? It is curious to consider whether there may be an intended link here. In the LXX the term 'μονογενὴς' only appears in a handful of Psalms, and once in Judges: Then Jephthah came to his home at Mizpah. And behold, his daughter came out to meet him with tambourines and with dances. She was his μονογενὴς; ...


3

It is quite arguable that the reason Abraham bound Isaac was to simply ensure that Isaac wouldn't try to escape under the stress of impending death. Pain motivates the individual to withdraw from damaging situations, to protect a damaged body part while it heals, and to avoid similar experiences in the future https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Self-...


3

The full verse is וישאלו אנשי המקום לאשתו ויאמר אחתי הוא כי ירא לאמר אשתי פן יהרגני אנשי המקום על רבקה כי טובת מראה היא And they asked, men of the place, for his wife, and he said "my sister is she," for he was afraid to say "my wife" "lest they kill me, men of the place, upon Rivkah, for good of appearance is she." (translation mine) Thus, ...


3

'Place' in Hebrews 12:17 is τοπος, topos, as in Acts 1:25. ... apostleship from which, transgressing, Judas fell to go to his own place. [Interlinear Literal from the Englishman's Greek New Testament (Bagster)]. Judas traded his position for thirty of silver after which the position was no longer his and was available for another, as prophesied in Psalm ...


3

There are a few possible understandings, as "brothers" meant "close male kin" in ancient Hebrew, in addition to "male siblings" (they didn't have a word for cousin, for example, as even in modern Arabic, which uses periphrasis like 'son of my uncle' or 'daughter of my uncle'). That is, it could be a parallelism, "brothers/one's mother's sons," where, as ...


3

There are more in the NT that are described with the word monogenes. Monogenes is a word of the Greek New Testament that occurs 9 times, whose meaning is contentious because of the Arian vs Trinitarian controversy. The contention is best illustrated by its translation in the earliest version, Jerome’s Vulgate of 400 AD. 3 times it applies to a parent’s ...


3

The Hebrew word translated "bless" is simply בָרַךְ (barak) and in almost all cases is just a series of well-wishes for a person. Indeed, the LXX translates this word as εὐλογέω (eulogeo) which is literally, "good words", or, "good thoughts". The word occurs frequently in the OT, eg, Gen 1:22, 28, 2:3, 5:2, 9:1, 26, 12:2, 14:19,...


2

I would like to suggest the following answer to your question. It comes from all the information in the Bible on this incident, not just those parts pointed out to us about Jacob and Rebekkah's deception. Why delay a blessing by asking for food? I would like to suggest that there were more deceptions involved in this story, than the ones plainly pointed ...


2

Both in 9:9 and 11:19, the author is speaking of something that was offered in place of some other thing at the time of the offering - a sort of substitute. I think this is a little different than the other verses you cite in that they speak of things representing other things (in the future), but not necessarily taking their physical place. In his ...


2

Rebecca was actually related to Isaac; she was the daughter of his cousin (through his fathers' side) Bethuel. It could be considered another instance of the Bible using 'brother' or 'sister' lato sensu, i.e., broadly speaking (and therefore, Isaac wasn't technically lying). The reason why Isaac did this is clearly stated: for he was afraid to confess ...


2

This story is mirrored in the story of Abram and his wife Sarai. Both couples moved into a foreign land because of famine. Each man chose to lie about his attractive wife, passing her off as a sister, motivated by a fear that he might be killed if it was known she was his wife. When Isaac's home was first hit by a famine 'besides the former famine that was ...


2

We are not told how Rebecca found out about Esau's plot, for three reasons, in order of importance: The point of the narrative is to show Rebecca's craftiness and foresight It would distract from the focus on Jacob and Rebecca The agency of her knowledge doesn't matter The first point of the narrative is to show Rebecca's resourcefulness and craftiness, ...


2

There is a lot of material out of chronological sequence in much of Genesis, put particularly the last half. Note the following: Isaac born to Abraham when he was 100 yeas old. Gen 21:1-5 Abraham goes to sacrifice Isaac at an unspecified time, Gen 22 Sarah dies at age 127 (Gen 23:1), Abraham is 137, Isaac is 37. Isaac marries Rebekah Gen 24, at age 40, ...


2

Jacob was a smooth man, a plain man dwelling in tents. Esau was a hairy man, a hunter, a man of the field. And the boys grew: and Esau was a cunning hunter, a man of the field; and Jacob was a plain man, dwelling in tents. [Genesis 25:27 KJV] And Jacob said to Rebekah his mother, Behold, Esau my brother is a hairy man, and I am a smooth man: [Genesis 27:...


2

The actual blessing pronounced by Isaac is recorded in Gen 27:27-29. It is referenced as a single past event in V33, 25, 36, 37. The solution here is as per some of the standard commentaries: The Cambridge Commentary simply says: blessed] Anticipating Genesis 27:26-29. Keil and Delitzsch Biblical Commentary on the Old Testament arrives at a similar ...


2

Let me suggest why Sarah laughed - she was flabbergasted and had trouble believing such a miracle could occur. That is, Sarah felt a mixture of emotions that ranged from outright disbelief, confusion, bewilderment and amazement. Here are more examples of a similar reaction: Gen 6 - I am sure that many many times during Noah's 120 years preparing for the ...


2

Deuteronomy 21:18 If someone has a stubborn and rebellious son who does not obey his father and mother and will not listen to them when they discipline him, 19his father and mother shall take hold of him and bring him to the elders at the gate of his town. 20They shall say to the elders, “This son of ours is stubborn and rebellious. He will not obey us. He ...


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