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23

The question is a good one, and worth discussing. My own sense is that it includes a mis-step, however, which casts a different light on things. My short answer to the question posed ("how does 'foot washing' lead to the act of 'sexual intercourse'?") is: it doesn't! First, though, to pick up a point made in a comment to the question. "Feet" as a euphemism ...


13

This is a good question -- or rather, set of questions. I begin by reiterating a comment from the Q&A linked by OP: to engage with this set of issues fully, one really needs to consult Catrin H. Williams, I Am He: The Interpretation of ʾAnî Hûʾ in Jewish and Early Christian Literature (WUNT II/113; Mohr Siebeck, 2000). There is plenty of other relevant ...


9

They fly across the expanse of the heavens. The word פָּנִים pānîm (lit. "faces") is used in "frozen union" with certain prepositions to form constructions that function syntactically as prepositions, linking a verbal idea to a noun.1 That is, they allow a noun to specify something about the nature of the verb. This is no different from other prepositional ...


9

The surrounding context makes clear that the reference to taking up a cross is to be understood as a reference to death. 24Then Jesus told his disciples, “If anyone would come after me, let him deny himself and take up his cross and follow me. 25For whoever would save his life will lose it, but whoever loses his life for my sake will find it.[1] This is ...


7

This answer is intended as a follow-up to fdb’s answer, with which I basically agree. OP: Is it a Greek-ism? Yes. Atticism might be another appropriate word. As mentioned, the phrase of interest is ἄνδρες ἀδελφοί (andres adelphoi; men, brothers). This appears to be modeled on the typical Athenian oratorical introductory formula, andres Athenaioi ("men,...


7

The word "hell" in this text is from the Hebrew word "sheol" (שְׁאוֹל), and can mean grave, pit, or tomb. To make one's bed there, obviously, would be a euphemism for death or dying. So the Psalmist is saying: "...if I go to my grave, you are there." In effect, you are correct: it is essentially a poetic metaphor for death. An ...


5

To take OP's main question in two stages, starting with the latter: [OP] ... could כה לחי mean something like "now to next year"? No, I don't think so. The main reason for this is already implicit in the information provided. For kōh to take on a temporal flavour, it really needs the help of ʿad to provide that nuance. Both HALOT and BDB (sub 3) list the ...


4

As already noted, the LXX is the best place to start, since the Greek word ὀρθοτομέω only occurs once in the Greek New Testament (hapax legomenon). The below verses compare the Greek LXX with the Hebrew MT, which will point us to the Hebrew words. In turn, we will look at the Hebrew words. Proverbs 3:6 (MT) בְּכָל־דְּרָכֶיךָ דָעֵהוּ וְהוּא יְיַשֵּׁר ...


4

The first time this expression was used was in Genesis 22:17. I will surely bless you, and I will surely multiply your offspring as the stars of heaven and as the sand that is on the seashore. And your offspring shall possess the gate of his enemies The significance of gate of a city is the place where administrative and judicial gatherings happen, ...


4

The term you are looking for is 'merism'. Technically, a merism is a particular kind of synecdoche. A merism indicates an entire spectrum of an ens by listing its polar elements. Some biblical examples of this poetry device in Jos 6:26 (eg: all his sons); 1 Chr 29:29 (eg: all the things David did); Psa 121:6 (eg: you are safe 24 hours a day); 139:2 (eg: you ...


3

There are some passages that suggest that God does not know all men (at least know them in a personal way). Consider that on the day of Judgment: Matthew 7:23 "And then I will declare to them, 'I never knew you; depart from Me, you who practice lawlessness!' God does not know those who are in sin; in other words, He has no regard for them


3

Consider understanding: a) Judges 19: 4-5, and the difference between the Hebrew text and the Greek text (LXX). His father-in-law, the girl’s father, persuaded him to stay with him for three days, and they ate and drank together, and spent the night there. On the fourth day they woke up early and the Levite got ready to leave. But the girl’s father said to ...


3

I found this page of citations with different traditional commentators. Sforno on Genesis 25:8 supports your hypothesis: ויאסף אל עמיו - אל צרור החיים לחיי העולם עם צדיקי הדורות He was gathered to his people - To be bound in life: the eternal life with the righteous of [prior] generations Radak (David Kimchi) indicates that it refers to his other family ...


3

Perhaps commenter Jas3.1, above, is on the right track. The gospel writers do not say it, but Jesus' "cross talk" was but one instance of perhaps many "difficult sayings" which they and the other disciples did not truly understand until Jesus had died, rose again, and been glorified (e.g., John 6:60 ff., where Jesus explained this difficult saying to His ...


3

It is an expression denoting lack of substance, vanity and emptiness. The 10 northern tribes (Ephraim) were looking for protection from the kings of both Assyria and Egypt. Carrying oil to Egypt was a gift to the king for consideration of a treaty with them. They were covering their bets, playing both sides against each other. They forgot to rely upon ...


3

To answer this question one must answer what does Ἑβραῖος ἐξ Ἑβραίων mean? Here are examples of how translations have translated it: a Hebrew of Hebrews (NAS, ESV, NIV, ASV, NET, ISV, Darby, YLT) a(n) Hebrew of the Hebrews (KJV, NKJV, D-R) a Hebrew born of Hebrews (HCSB, NRSV) a Hebrew born from Hebrews (LEB) a Hebrew of Hebrew ...


3

The phrase is used by the Apostle Paul to state that he was the greatest example of someone who attempted to attain righteousness by trying to keep the law. Paul claims to be head and shoulders above his counterparts in the Jews religion. In 1 Corinthians 15, he states he worked harder that anyone else in their religion. 1 Cor 15: 9-10 (KJV) 9 For I am ...


3

The Hebrew meaning of "to see YHVH" was to feel and know His presence / His word. After having waited through the false statements provided by Job's three "friends," Elihu begins to provide the answer in Job ch. 32 and reprimands the three and Job for judging and questioning YHVH's judgment. Then in ch. 38, YHVH speaks. "Then the ...


3

Paul is recounting his own experience. His narrative is that which he, himself, can testify of, since he, himself, experienced it. ... οτε δε ευδοκησεν ο θεος ... αποκαλυψαι τον υιον αυτου εν εμοι [Gal 1:15...16 TR] ... and when God was well pleased ... to reveal His Son in me [YLT] The revelation was within himself. He experienced it. Only he knew of ...


3

I'm going to suggest that what Paul is doing is weaving the "call" of Jeremiah into his own "call" for his intended Jewish audience in Galatia. Jeremiah 1:5 says: “Before I formed you in the womb I knew you, and before you were born I set you apart and appointed you as a prophet to the nations (לַגּוֹיִ֖ם - the Gentiles).” Galatians 1:...


3

In קֹהֶ֣לֶת Kohelet | "Ecclesiastes" chapter 7:3, the Gatherer of wisdom states : "Vexation is better than revelry; for though the face be sad, the heart may be glad." ( ט֥וֹב כַּ֖עַס מִשְּׂח֑וֹק כִּֽי־בְרֹ֥עַ פָּנִ֖ים יִ֥יטַב לֵֽב ) The לֵֽב Lev | "heart" refers to a person's rational faculties or a moral Neshamah (Proverbs 20:...


3

It's considered a figure of speech (Meiosis). You've probably used this phrase at least once or have heard someone use it, the dog's bark is bigger than its bite, much less a dead dog. And a flea bite is harmless. In this David expresses his humility; he's harmless to Saul. David respected Saul and would never kill God's anointed. I recall Saul was to step ...


3

The grammars use terms such as desiderative and/or optative. מִֽי־֭יִתֵּן is basically like an interjection to introduce a sentence expressing something desired. A more literal translation is "Who will give/provide?" It's an interrogative clause, not a relative clause. Grammars 2) Desiderative/Optative (especially in the phrase מִי־...


2

This is only a small addition to previous answers, which have dealt well with the main issue. Act 20:37 And they all wept sore, and fell on Paul's neck, and kissed him The idiom is not restricted to Hebrew: Here a Gentile author is writing about a group of predominantly Gentiles saying goodbye to the apostle to the Gentiles. It is possible that Luke was ...


2

You might want to consider another meaning and teaching that is later revisited in the new testament which is linked to the meaning in Samuel 12:12 and can be found in Matthew 6:1 : Be careful not to practice your righteousness in front of others to be seen by them. If you do, you will have no reward from your Father in heaven. The concept of under ...


2

Circumcision was a "legal" contract with god. As Both Aaron & Moses were of the Levite tribe, they both had a birthright to be religious leaders of Israel, however since Moses was cast into the river or reeds, he was of the house of Pharaoh and lost his legitimate rite to speak for and to the people of Israel. This is the meaning of the uncircumcized ...


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