19

Although I disagree with your presupposition that the ages are merely symbolic, I think this is a great question nonetheless. The reason I say this is that regardless of whether the ages are historically significant, we should assume they are literarily significant. The Bible is literature, and each author (or redactor) of each book has crafted his work of ...


11

Sheep provide wool for clothing. And Abel sacrificed to God from his flock, following the example God had set with regard to the provision of a covering of skins for Adam and Eve. There is no reference to Abel eating the sheep. And Abel, he also brought of the firstlings of his flock and of the fat thereof. And the Lord had respect unto Abel and to his ...


9

There would be no reason to doubt the veracity of the bible on the subject of the story of Barabbas and the custom of releasing a prison from prison at the time of the Passover. There is in fact evidence of the custom in the Mishnah. See snips of article below. Citation: Chavel, Charles B. “The Releasing of a Prisoner on the Eve of Passover in Ancient ...


5

Pilate was a skilled politician, and typical Roman tactics were to be unconcerned with the internal politics of vassal regions. As long as tributes were paid and there were no uprisings, the Roman empire was typically unconcerned. In fact, the Roman empire actually preferred drama in their vassal states as this divided and conflicted the region. So long as ...


5

The Rabbis determined their answer based on Joshua 3:4 where the distance from the tents to the Tabernacle was about 2000 cubits (.5+ miles). So the Jewish people would have been allowed to travel at least that far in order to participate in Tabernacle worship, therefore the Rabbi's permitted the same for the Sabbath. This specific regulation applied only to ...


4

He may have spoken to the apostles off screen about it (during one of the post Resurrection appearances in example one). However both of your examples have other possible explanations In example one the part quoted does not seem long enough for the apostles to fall asleep. He may have said that audibly before they slept and continued praying after they ...


4

"Did Pilate acknowledge Jesus as the King of the Jews - challenging Herod's own claim?" Have a look at this: John 19:10-12 ESV So Pilate said to him, “You will not speak to me? Do you not know that I have authority to release you and authority to crucify you?” Jesus answered him, “You would have no authority over me at all unless it had been given you ...


4

My Unified Perspective Background I am one scholar who views it from a unified perspective. My particular argument for this immediately follows here. I will then note some other versions of unified views, and just a second hand listing of non-unified views. Regarding: Uh, Jesus, didn't Simon Peter and Thomas just ask you this? Yes, they had. Now the ...


4

religionthink.com says that, although debate continues on the details of the hypothesis, almost all scholars agree that Psalm 29’s background is Baal worship, as portrayed in the tablets from Ugarit. There is undoubtedly good reason for this, but there may be other good reasons to alter that hypothesis somewhat. First of all, the psalm is obviously a hymn ...


4

The Passover Lamb Conceptually, the Passover Lamb makes sense. It is chosen, without blemish, killed (and eaten) on the Passover, and it's blood is used to make the sign which will cause the house to be passed over. All of these would apply to Jesus. However, textually the Passover Lamb (ἀρήν) is different from the Lamb (ἀμνός) of God: GNT: καὶ ἐμβλέψας ...


3

The reading with "servant" is very tenuous and has no textual basis. Firstly, the Hebrew word שמש appears in the tanakh approximately 134 times, of which almost every use exclusively means sun. There are a couple of examples, most notably Isaiah 54:12, although also Psalms 84:12, where some commentators deviate from this meaning. The Isaiah verse is ...


3

The name abbas was particularly popular. The more popular the name, the less likely that the name would have been fabricated for thematic purposes. It simply wouldn't be interpreted metaphorically. To demonstrate the commonness of Abba as a name, look at this quote from the Babylonian Talmud, Berachoth 18b. You can also see the note, here. I am looking ...


2

Because the historical and linguistic context of the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament) and Christian New Testament are significantly different, each testament (for lack of a better term) is treated—at least in the modern academy—as a separate field. While the divide is less drastic than that sounds, you're probably better off selecting a resource of one or the ...


2

Regarding the difference in names, we recognize that the Disciples generally went by two different names: one Greek, and one Aramaic (or Hebrew). Simon (bar-Jonah), for example, was also known by his Greek name "Petros" (an interesting anglicization for Peter could have been "Rock Johnson"); Levi was also known as Matthaios, anglicized as "Matthew". ...


2

Many people think the Genesis ages are chosen to be numbers that people could easily remember, and some are. The reason for this is no doubt that many of the traditions that came to be recorded in the Bok of Genesis were initially handed down orally by tradents, who used a variety of techniques to help them remember the stories, including poetry, numbers ...


2

I will address only the first two issues in the question, regarding dates. The bottom line of my answer is that John is factually accurate and that he intentionally deviated from the Synoptics for the purpose of noting important theological meaning, not for the sake of dating accuracy itself. There are two possible chronologies, which I will call C14 and ...


2

Question Can John's Passion chronology be reconciled with that of the Synoptics? Answer: A "High Day", (John 19:31), is indicative of a "High Holy Day Sabbath". There were two Sabbath's that week. Whichever day of the week a High Holy Day fell on - that day was a Sabbath, (See Wikipedia: Special Sabbaths) - even if the very next day was also a ...


2

A couple of people have already mentioned the animals grazing in the fields at night. I think this does indicate a time of year. The Babylonian Talmud, a collection of Jewish teachings, substantiates that this would occur only between the passover (March/April) and the first rainfall (October/November). Our Rabbis taught: The following are pasture animals ...


2

The evidence that Luke might have used a priest as one of the sources for his gospel can be broken down into statistical evidence of a focus on the temple or on the priesthood, and evidence that would require the expertise or special knowledge of a priest. The evidence that he was not likely to have had assistance from a priest is to be found in source ...


2

Yes there is Talmudic evidence that - at least - some parts were modeled after Ezekiel's temple. There are few places in the Mishna in Middot (2:5; 3:1; 4:1; 4:2) where it is explicitly stated that parts of the second temple were modeled after Ezekiel's vision. For example, there were two chambers on the sides of the "Big gate" of the Heichal, the southern ...


2

This "queen of heaven" is unlikely to be Babylonian goddess, since the story takes place in Egypt, and the worshipers came directly from Judea. The people are a little more specific on who she is when they say But we will certainly do whatever has gone out of our own mouth, to burn incense to the queen of heaven and pour out drink offerings to her, as we ...


2

It was a little over 1/2 mile. As the comment above notes, the common cubit was about 18 inches, or 1.5 feet. Multiplied out, then 2,000 cubits comes to 3,000 feet, or 0.56 miles. Excerpt from Barne's Notes on the Bible on Acts 1:12, 'A sabbath-day's journey - As far as might be lawfully traveled by a Jew on the Sabbath. This was 2,000 paces or cubits, or ...


2

1. Question Restatement How can we trust the Gospels if nobody was there to witness? Note: There seem to be two different questions here: 1. What is the standard for determining the truth of indirect testimony; and 2: Can the Gospels be trusted? 2. Definitions Disciples: As the original question points out: It is difficult to accept the Gospels as credible ...


1

One possibility is that Jesus is being compared to the Paschal sacrifice, which was a lamb (Exodus 12:3). Significantly for this interpretation, John records Jesus' crucifixion as having happened on the day of preparation for Passover at about noon (John 19:14), which was the same day the Passover was to be sacrificed (Exodus 12:6). John makes a further ...


1

It is my policy not to answer a "why" question regarding the motive of others unless their intentions have been provided, except in a most tentative manner. In other words, since we do not seem to be provided with the "why" of Abel's actions, any answer will at best be speculative. To presume why people do the things they do without them saying why is an ...


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