14

No, No, No!!! Hos 13:16 is a simple statement of future fact (ie, a prophecy) - Samaria was unfaithful to God (by rebellion) and thus would be invaded by barbarous people who would do unspeakable things to the inhabitants of Samaria. That is, because the Samarians had rejected God (rebelled against God) and His protection, God, in obedience to their wish, ...


12

The short answer is "No". Perhaps there is a little confusion at work here, because this verse is embedded in one of the Aramaic passages found in the (otherwise) Hebrew Bible: it is not in Hebrew.1 The "-ah" ending that makes this look like "prophetess" (if the word was in Hebrew), is in fact the Aramaic definite article, = "the". (See heading 2.2, bullet #...


12

Ruth was a beautiful foreign woman in the land. That's the danger. https://www.biblegateway.com/resources/all-women-bible/ruth Her name is a contraction of reuth, which may either be the word for “the act of seeing,” “sight” and hence, as in English, objectively “a sight,” “something worth seeing”—or the word for “friendship” or “a female friend,” like reu ...


11

(Supplementary answer) kuriakē(i) (LSJ) (from κυριακῇ ἡμέρᾳ) is an adjectival form of kurios, "lord", which could be rendered "lordly" (on analogy of "royal" = "kingly", roughly!). As the adjective "royal" indicates something belonging to the monarch ("the royal palace"), so kuriakos indicates something belonging to the "lord". Rev 1:10 uses it with day: "...


11

In the Hebrew Scriptures, death was "dirty." For example, contact with anything dead (whether animal or man) made the Israelite unclean in the ritual sense. Thus any scavenger was not appropriate for human consumption, since such animals consumed the refuse and/or carcasses of other animals. Only animals who chewed the cud (and split the hoof) were consumed ...


10

The lexical meaning of the noun שָׂטָן śāṭān in biblical Hebrew is "adversary" or the like. It occurs 27x in 23 verses in the Hebrew Bible. In most instances, it is clear this it is best translated by the word "adversary": in Psalm 109:6 it clearly refers to a hostile person; in the Samuel/Kings references, it refers to human opponents of Israel or its ...


10

The ancient Hebrews used a lunar calendar; each month began with the sighting of the new crescent, and continued until the next sighting, which means that approximately half of the months had 29 days, and approximately half had 30. In order to keep the months in the correct seasons the Hebrews (like the Babylonians, Greeks etc.) must have practiced some form ...


10

Although I have my qualms about the particular way that OP has formulated the question, it is an interesting one and could be sharply focused on two texts -- or textual clusters -- in the Hebrew Bible. Terms must be distinguished; I would do it this way: polytheism is the belief that there are many gods who require devotion; henotheism is the belief that ...


10

The Hebrew expression בן לילה means "in a night", in the sense of "one night it's here and the next night it's gone". In this verse, the expression appears twice as an adverbial phrase1 modifying the verbs היה (was) and אבד (perished), not as an adjectival phrase relating to the plant, which is only mentioned once. In general, the Hebrew ...


9

Short Answer: "Generally it is the only translation" (but it is complicated) First, there are two (three?) different words in the references you give. The Nephilim (נְפִילִים; a word only ever found in plural form in OT) only appears three times in Gen 6:4 and Num 13:33 (twice). The word in 1 Ch 20:8 (also 1 Ch 20:6 and 1 Ch 8:2; cf. also 1 Ch 4:12) is ...


9

By way of supplementing and extending the answers already provided for this question: As noted elsewhere in this Q&A, the kingdom that was united under the thrones of Saul, David, and Solomon, split in the aftermath of Solomon's reign into distinct "nations": one in the north, and one in the south (narrated in 1 Kings 12). When the two designations "...


9

Gen 22:17 That in blessing I will bless thee, and in multiplying I will multiply thy seed as the stars of the heaven, and as the sand which is upon the sea shore; God promised Abraham that his descendants would be as the sand of the sea, and as the stars of heaven. These two metaphors are in direct apposition to each other, and explain each other. The ...


9

The short answer to your questions is that none of these books have survived. This is not surprising; a very large number of books existed in the ancient world of which only a tiny minority have been preserved till now. But specifically to your first example: the Greek historian Ctesias claimed to have known the royal notebooks (basilikaì diphthérai), “in ...


9

From: B. Waltke and M. O'Connor, An Introduction to Biblical Hebrew Syntax (Eisenbrauns, 1990), § 21.2.3e, p. 361: +-------------+------+------------+------+ | Occurrences | Roots used* | | # % | # % | +----------+-------------+------+------------+------+ | Qal | 49180 | ...


9

Introduction I take it this is a question about the nature of the evidence relating to "life after death" in the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament; hereafter "HB"), and the scholarly interpretation of that evidence. OP is looking for arguments in support of Christine Hayes' claim in the online lecture as cited: [Hayes:] No life after death in the Bible either ....


8

It's unlikely that John intended the phrase to refer to the "day of the Lord" as found in the prophets. While the phrase found in Revelation 1:10 isn't found elsewhere in the New Testament, the phrase "day of the Lord" is found in several places. When the phrase is used elsewhere in the New Testament, the grammar matches that found in the prophets. In 1 ...


8

You appear to be overlooking the obvious reading because you are attaching the plural to the wrong thing in your head. 1 sabbath = 1 period of 7 days ending in a day of rest. 2 sabbaths = 2 periods of 7 days with days of rest on each 7th day. 3 sabbaths = 3 periods of 7 days with days of rest on each 7th day. See the pattern? Most of those plural readings ...


8

The "chabod" part of the name Ichabod (אִיכָבוֹד) comes without doubt from the word כָּבוֹד, which is the word for glory in the latter portion of the verse. The "I" (אִי) has been interpreted variously as "woe" (Greek), making the name mean "woe honor!"; "no" (Rashi), for "no honor"; or "where" (Radak), for "where is honor?" אִי as "no" appears in the ...


8

No, God did not contradict Himself, since He never forbade all kinds of images to begin with, that, going on to command images to be made, He could be said to contradict Himself. Something is always omitted when people use Exodus 20 to claim God forbids all images: the immediately surrounding words/context: Exodus 20:1-6 (DRB) And the Lord spoke all ...


7

I think it's helpful to frame answers in parts. So here goes a three-part response: First, 'flowing' connotes the abundance of something. (This point is a one-liner, because I won't insult anyone's intelligence by expounding on this.) Second, milk is obtained from domesticated livestock. Livestock survives in many habitats, but only overflow with milk in ...


7

In the article Hebrew Henotheism: Challenging the notion of Biblical Monotheism, the case is made that the Shema was to be understood relationally with Israel. The 1985 edition of the Jewish Publication Society translation of the TaNaKH portrays this when they translate the verse as “Hear, O Israel! The LORD is our God, the LORD alone.” This reading ...


7

The Leningrad Codex indicates a Qere and Ketiv difference, with the written version being לא (he was not) and the vocalized version being לו (he was). The Great Isaiah Scroll in Jerusalem reads לוא with the ו looking more like a yod (י) which is common, but which any reader would understand to be a ו. This would likely indicate that the text intended the ...


6

The Essenes (headquartered in Qumran) used a solar calendar like the one described in Jubilees and 1 Enoch. Here, each of the twelve months had 30 days except for the last month of each quarter which had 31. This was a marked difference from the calendars of the mainstream Jews, and to set themselves apart is why they used this calendar.1 In one of their ...


6

In the MT there is a closed parsha break between the verses that are numbered in Christian editions as Micah 5:1 and 5:2. The Jews adopted the Christian chapter breaks in the printed editions of the MT except when the Christian chapter breaks split a parsha within three verses of the beginning or end of a parsha, in which case the printed MT editions move ...


6

Grammatical Considerations Hebrew grammarians recognize what is called a cognate accusative. Ronald Williams in his Williams' Hebrew Syntax, 3rd ed. (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2010) defines this as: When the accusative has the same root as the verb. (p.19, #51) So in your case, the accusative is the noun "dream" (חֲלוֹם) and the verb ...


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