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8

The way many read Isaiah 6:9-10 is to hear it as ironic, as showing God expressing his utter frustration with Israel. God will give Isaiah his very word to proclaim to his people, but they'll still ignore what he says. The more he speaks truth, the more they'll ignore him. It won't be Isaiah's fault if people reject him for what he says. One thing that it ...


5

Mark 1:34 explains this … and He did not allow the demons to speak, because they knew Him. Jesus did not need or want the testimony of demons. I wouldn't either. He would have enough of the Pharisees accusing him of being in league with the devil in a short while. The reason given is that the demons "knew him". This is not a testimony of faith or ...


5

Ah, the ESV's breaking up of the runon sentence I think makes it harder to catch the meaning. Because they disconnected "He listened to Paul speaking" from "And Paul, looking intently at him" with a period, I completely missed that all this happened while Paul was speaking. Until I went to Unbound Bible to look at the Greek, and I also ...


4

This is a simple grammatical question that is resolved by understanding how the Greek works. Greek is a highly inflected language, especially the verbs. The verb in question here is: ἰάομαι (iaomai) = "I heal", in its lexical form; however, in James 5:16 it occurs in the form ἰαθῆτε (iathēte) = Verb - Aorist Subjunctive Passive - 2nd Person Plural;...


3

Jesus causes amazement more than once in Mark's Gospel and this is the only case that I can find for which the cause is not immediately obvious1: 1:27And they were all amazed, so that they questioned among themselves, saying, “What is this? A new teaching with authority! He commands even the unclean spirits, and they obey him.” ESV 2:12And he rose and ...


3

There is obviously a lot written on Psalm 23, and this verse in particular, so it is not probable that we will completely solve this issue here. There are two translational (how do we move it into English) and interpretational (how do we understand the concept of this word) questions: how do you translate and interpret "restore" or "refresh" which comes ...


2

Question Restatement: "In Mark 9, why is the crowd, (who was with the disciples as they were trying to cast out a demon), "amazed" to see Jesus--since he had not done anything yet? Amaze, from Merriam-Webster - - obsolete : bewilder, perplex. Mark 9:14 - When they came back to the disciples, they saw a large crowd around them, and some scribes arguing ...


2

The power to heal was present in Paul's ministry as described in the book of Acts Acts 14:8 NASB 8 At Lystra a man was sitting who had no strength in his feet, lame from his mother’s womb, who had never walked. 9 This man was listening to Paul as he spoke, who, when he had fixed his gaze on him and had seen that he had faith to be [f]made well, 10 said ...


2

In Exodus, the sixth plague of Egypt was a plague of boils (שְׁחִין), the only instance that God brought a disease on the Egyptian people themselves - apart from the inexplicable death of their firstborn, but this is something that would not normally be called a disease. In reading Exodus 15:26, it would appear that God is saying that if the Israelites "...


2

HORIZONTAL GENERATION? The English word 'generation' doesn't mean the same thing as the word (** מַטָּע**) Yeshua (Jesus) likely used. To get a sense of the original meaning, think of the English word though: 'Generation' arises from the root 'gen' (genos "birth", genus "family", generate "produce") so denotes a relationship ...


2

I believe that Matthew 8:17 in part happened during Jesus' earthy minstry. This is confirmed by the previous verses. Also notice at vs16 Matthew distinguishes between the sick who were healed and the demon-possessed who were delivered. Remember, Jesus delivered a man at Mark 1:23-27. Also notice that Matthew recognized that Isaiah 53 applies to physical ...


1

First, you’ve misquoted 1 Peter 2:24. It should read past tense, not present. IE: “...by His stripes you were healed.” Isaiah 53:5, which Peter is clearly quoting, uses present tense. Why the difference? Isaiah was writing before the cross, while Peter was writing after the cross where Jesus had paid for all sin and sickness. In the light of these two ...


1

The word of God is very clear on every subject. All things are possible to them that believe Mark 9:23. The word believe means to accept, to receive, to take and also to agree. Remember that God is not a man that He should lie. When Jesus said in Mark 16:17-20 that these signs shall follow those who believe. It means for any gift that you and I will receive ...


1

I subscribe to the view that the reason is because the gifts that he was performing in the early days was a "sign to the Jews"; not all spiritual gifts are still in operation today; or, they aren't necessarily "needed." The gift of tongues and the gift of healing has ceased. The keyword here is "gift." This isn't to say that God doesn't or won't heal today, ...


1

Charles-Edward Amory Winslow (The Conquest of Epidemic Disease: A Chapter in the History of Ideas, pages 36-37) explains How the ancient Israelites viewed the occurrence of disease: Among the Semitic peoples, the concept of disease as punishment for sin reaches its apogee ... In sharpest contrast with the prevailing demonology of the New Testament, as ...


1

It is impossible to answer this question beyond giving a baseless opinion. We have exactly what is in the text and nothing more. Even if we had a tradition to refer to in this matter, it would be nothing more than that - a tradition - and really have no more weight than the opinion of anyone here, because of a lack of information from the text. One thing ...


1

Mark 5:20 mentions the Decapolis when Jesus healed the demon possessed man. Mark 7:31 mentions at least one time afterward that Jesus visited the Decapolis, but doesn't mention the man formerly demon possessed. Note John's statement about what was recorded in the Gospels: Now there are also many other things that Jesus did. Were every one of them to ...


1

Brown-Driver-Briggs has "blind" עִוֵּר in Psalm 148:6 listed under figurative. The trident looking symbol in front of 146:8 is the BDB symbol for Psalms: †עִוֵּר S5787 TWOT1586a GK6426 adj. blind;—only abs. ע׳ Ex 4:11 +, pl. עִוְרִים 2 S 5:6 +, f. עִוְרוֹת Is 42:7; (c. art. הָעִוֵּר Dt 28:29, elsewhere הַע׳ Baer Ginsb; van d. H. לָעִוֵּר Jb 29:15, ...


1

Is Psalm 146:8 a promise for a particular time? NIV Psalm 146:8 the Lord gives sight to the blind, the Lord lifts up those who are bowed down, the Lord loves the righteous. A promise to the Kingdom of God. All verses from NASB unless otherwise noted. The context of the verse suggests physical illness and not spiritual. Why? In verse three we note ...


1

The context seems to suggest that a physical blindness is being referred to, rather than a spiritual one. The Septuagint reads the Lord wisens up the blind. Is Psalm 146 to be understood to only refer to the ministry of the Messiah ? Is Hosea 11:1 to be understood to only refer to the infancy of the Messiah ? Is "open ( the eyes of ) the blind" just ...


1

Your answer is in the next verse. Mark 6.6 says that he marvelled at their unbelief. Whenever Jesus healed someone, we hear him say" your faith has made you well". The healing anointing of Jesus was released when those people had faith. To be accurate, their faith became a sort of receptor device,through which they received their healing. People in this ...


1

Reference to the final song of Moses And he said, ‘I will hide my face from them, I will see what their end will be, For they are a perverse generation, children in whom is no faithfulness. (Deuteronomy 32:20) This is part of the song sung by Moses just before he died - a last ditch effort to communicate to Israel their relationship with God as he ...


1

Luke 9:41 in the YLT is, " And Jesus answering said, `O generation, unstedfast and perverse, till when shall I be with you, and suffer you? bring near hither thy son;'" The words were addressed to the entire multitude before him, among which surely were unbelieving scribes and Pharisees, as well as the disciples who might still have had some lingering ...


1

The man in the crowd is apparently a Jew. A major theme of the gospels is the unbelief of the Jews both because of their history in the scriptures as always exasperating God. In the gospels as in the book of Jonah the Jews are contrasted with the gentiles in that the Jews hardly ever exhibit any faith while the gentiles often have amazing faith: NIV ...


1

The assumption that one requires divine authority to exorcise demons, cure infirmities, or perform miracles does not appear to have been shared by biblical writers. There are several instances in the gospels themselves where individuals other than Jesus and his disciples are said to exorcise demons (e.g. Mt.7:22, 12:27; Lk.9:49) and other examples of people ...


1

Perhaps the most important verse in this brief exchange is the following verse,(vs 50) And Jesus said unto him, Forbid him not: for he that is not against us is for us. It's apparent that this individual saw Jesus cast out demons, and saw the disciples cast out demons; what he did not see was the Scribes and Pharisees cast out demons. The key passage ...


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