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10

You have the Greek word κάμηλος meaning camel. You have the Greek word κάμιλος meaning rope. In the Talmud (BT 6, 601, 1. 16) we read that the people of Puimbedita deemed themselves so clever that they could put an elephant through a needle's eye… Some later MSS read in Mark 10, 25 and the two parallel passages κάμιλος, cable, instead of κάμηλος, ...


8

I do not like this proposed rule for several reasons, apart from the fact that it is confusing and misleading and never required. If the rule is correct (which I doubt) then John 20:28 is a clear exception. I cannot find an instance of where the Apostolic Fathers suggested that part of John 20:28 is addressed to God the Father rather than entirely to Jesus ...


8

NLT translation philosophy is the following (quote from NLT Bible Introduction, emphases mine): The translators of the New Living Translation set out to render the message of the original texts of Scripture into clear, contemporary English. As they did so, they kept the concerns of both formal-equivalence and dynamic-equivalence in mind. On the one hand, ...


7

Background Luke 3:4 is one of the 237 instances where the New World Translation (NWT) uses Jehovah: just as it is written in the book of the words of Isaiah the prophet: “A voice of one crying out in the wilderness: ‘Prepare the way of Jehovah! Make his roads straight. (NWT) As it is written in the book of the words of Isaiah the prophet, “The voice ...


7

πριν αβρααμ γενεσθαι εγω ειμι [TR] John 8:58 [Text undisputed] Baxter's Analytical Greek Lexicon says of the word γενεσθαι, genesthai, that it is the aorist 2, infinitive and is an inflection of γίνομαι, ginomai Strong 1096 which means 'to come' 'to become' or 'to come into being'. And, without a doubt, the meaning of εἰμί, eimi Strong 1510 is 'I exist' ...


7

The humanity of man, inwardly, is as complex - and more so - than the body of man which is wondrously composed. 'I am fearfully and wonderfully made' says the Psalmist, 139:14. But just as the internals of the body are not (visibly) compartmentalised (though the organs all have their own specialised functions) so the immaterial parts of humanity are varied ...


7

You can think of διάφορος as having two similar meanings: “different” and “distinguished” (any reputable lexicon will attest). Something distinguished is different, indeed, but often eminently so. For example, Daniel described four beasts that arose from the sea, “differing from one another,”1 but the fourth beast, he says, was “more different”2 (i.e., ...


7

This is a typically terse Koine Greek conversation. The Greek phrase in question is: Τί ἐμοὶ καὶ σοί, γύναι We note the following facts: ἐμοὶ is dative and thus, "to me" σοί is dative and thus, "to you/thee" (singular) γύναι is vocative and thus, "Woman", or, "Ma'am" and is the person to whom the question is ...


6

Answer: In these contexts, no deductive/inductive inferences can reasonably be made about who "the Word" received life from, or whether it was eternally existing. John 5:26, NKJV - For as the Father has life in Himself, so He has granted the Son to have life in Himself … John 5 only speaks of the "gift to impart life"—which is very different from the "...


6

The Textus Receptus Greek text for Ephesians 5:21 reads : υποτασσομενοι αλληλοις εν φοβω θεου The KJV translates this as : Submitting yourselves one to another in the fear of God. [KJV 1769] See Textus Receptus Bible The Greek text is disputed in this verse and the Westcott & Hort/Nestle Aland Greek text has Χριστου instead of θεου. This is a ...


6

Is ὁ θεός nominative or vocative? The question is a bit simplistic. The answer is that all occurrences of θεός in Heb. 1:8–9 are in fact nominative. Anyone who can read a declension table can tell you that. But, that isn’t actually the real question, which is, “Are all occurrences of θεός in Heb. 1:8–9 functioning as nominatives?” The answer to that ...


6

In Greek, the stem carries the meaning and the suffix is usually the part of speech. In the example you quote we have: ἁγιάζω (hagiazó) is the verb meaning to hallow, sanctify, make holy etc. That is, set apart for a special purpose ἁγιασμός (hagiasmos) is a noun meaning the effect of consecration: sanctification of heart and life ἅγιον (hagion) is a noun ...


6

In the Old Testament, Jehovah’s self-proclaimed title of “I AM” is given special prominence in Ex 3:13-15. While we are told “I Am” was to be God’s name forever, there is no record in the Bible of it ever being used again (in Hebrew) unless we admit the grammatical connection between “I am” and the “Tetragrammaton” (which see), YHWH, commonly translated, “...


5

In view of the entire biblical corpus, the most suitable translation of ἀρχή would be “beginning.” However, this does not require Jesus Christ to be understood as a creature. One definition of “beginning,” like the word ἀρχή,1 is “origin; source”2 (i.e., first cause). Philo, a contemporary of Paul and Jesus in the 1st century A.D., wrote the following,3 ...


5

The following is what Greek Scholar A.T.Robertson says about John 1:2. Verse 2 The same (ουτος — houtos). “This one,” the Logos of John 1:1, repeated for clarity, characteristic of John‘s style. He links together into one phrase two of the ideas already stated separately, “in the beginning he was with God,” “afterwards in time he came to be with man” (...


5

It might be better translated cowardly. The word appears only three times in the New Testament - here and in two of the Gospels: And he saith unto them, Why are ye fearful, O ye of little faith? Then he arose, and rebuked the winds and the sea; and there was a great calm (Matthew 8:26) καὶ λέγει αὐτοῖς· τί δειλοί ἐστε, ὀλιγόπιστοι; τότε ἐγερθεὶς ...


5

δειλοῖς does not exist independently in the verse, but is clearly tied to ἀπίστοις, or unbelieving, as the grammatical cases of each word indicate. Being fearful or cowardly and being unbelieving here, are a package deal. They go together. They are in this context synonyms of each other connected by the copulative καὶ to show the union between, and the ...


5

The New Testament is far more informed about “intersexuality” than most realise. Strictly speaking, a eunuch is an emasculated male but the term became used more generally to approximate what we now might call “intersex”. As Jesus said: “And I say to you: whoever divorces his wife, except for sexual immorality, and marries another, commits adultery.” The ...


5

It is not consistent to claim that the "εγω ειμι" in John 9:9 is "clearly identification rather than existence because of the implied predicate" and yet claim that John 8:24 is an instance of existence rather than identification, because according to John 8:18-29, the Jews who had heard him understood very well that he was claiming "...


4

Firstly, the link supplied to an article by Gregory Blunt appears to me to show that Blunt is arguing against Daniel B Wallace's treatment of the article : However, it will be demonstrated that a consistent treatment of the article as pronoun, described by Middleton, and anaphora with respect to "individualizing articles" as described by Daniel Wallace ...


4

Overview 1 Peter, a servant and apostle of Jesus Christ, To those who have obtained a faith of equal standing with ours by the righteousness of our God and Savior Jesus Christ: 2 May grace and peace be multiplied to you in the knowledge of God and of Jesus our Lord. (2 Peter 1:1-2) [ESV] 1 Συμεὼν Πέτρος δοῦλος καὶ ἀπόστολος Ἰησοῦ Χριστοῦ τοῖς ...


4

Like I told you before, the Greek word for "beginning" is arche and we get our English word "architect" from that Greek word. The following is what Wallace has to say and the BDAG is included in his comments. "This is the solemn pronouncement of the Amen, the faithful and true witness, the originator,54. 54tn Or “the beginning of God’s creation”; or “the ...


4

Syntax The living Father sent me, and because of him I live also. In the same way whoever eats me will live because of me. [GNT] καθὼς ἀπέστειλέν με ὁ ζῶν πατὴρ κἀγὼ ζῶ διὰ τὸν πατέρα καὶ ὁ τρώγων με κἀκεῖνος ζήσει δι᾽ ἐμέ [mGNT] All English translations treat the verb ζῶν ("to live") as an adjective describing a characteristic of the noun ("...


4

The word "δειλός" translated as "fearful" in the KJV is Strong's Gr. 1169. The definition is cowardly or fearful. Many of the English translations use "coward" or "cowardly" at Rev. 21:8. But, the ASV, the GNV, the KJV, and the YLT are among those that translate it as "fearful". It is not just any fear, because we are to fear God to be obedient to His ...


4

The phrase "dead works" (νεκρῶν ἔργων) only occurs in Heb 6:1 and 9:14. Commentators have offered several views about what these are such as: Sinful acts Righteous acts done to earn salvation Works done by people before conversion, ie, by the "carnal mind" Whatever we make of these dead works, they are something that requires repentance as both references ...


4

The verb in Philippians 2:5 is second person plural so that the verse says "Let this mind be in you (pl)" as opposed to "Let this mind be in you (sg)" The verse isn't saying that we must have the mind that was in Christ, but that we must put "this" into our minds, "this" being the humility that was in Christ Jesus. The first two words of the sentence (...


4

This is a great question especially in view of Heb 10:25 which says: [Do] not giving up meeting together, as some are in the habit of doing, but encouraging one another--and all the more as you see the Day approaching. This question can be rephrased as, Must meeting together be a physical meeting or can it be otherwise? The noun translated "meeting ...


4

If as you suggest a semantic aspect at Titus 2:13 justifies that "our great God" is the Father and not Jesus can you please "reconcile" the immediate context which states it is Jesus who is appearing at His second coming, not God the Father? Moreover at Titus 2:14 states it was God the Son Jesus "who gave Himself us, that HE might redeem us from every ...


4

The author is alluding to the two comings (advents) of the Messiah. During the first advent, he came as “the lamb of God which takes away the sin of the world.”1 The Lord Jesus Christ was not “without sin” (i.e., he was with sin) during his first advent, although that sin was not his own. Rather, “he bore the sin of many and made intercession for the ...


4

Yes, there is a free tool that you can use on www.blueletterbible.org. On the home page, click on “Search” on the navigation bar. On the search page, simply enter the Strong’s numbers of the words you would like to search for. (In this example, I search for G4160 and G18.) Then, click the icon of the arrow pointed to the right. Note: Searching for “G4160 ...


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