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There is a textual matter - the Greek MSS differ in Matt 19:16, 17. NA28/UBS5, W&H, Souter, NIVGNT, etc, have this: Καὶ ἰδοὺ εἷς προσελθὼν αὐτῷ εἶπεν Διδάσκαλε, τί ἀγαθὸν ποιήσω ἵνα σχῶ ζωὴν αἰώνιον; ὁ δὲ εἶπεν αὐτῷ Τί με ἐρωτᾷς περὶ τοῦ ἀγαθοῦ; εἷς ἐστιν ὁ ἀγαθός· εἰ δὲ θέλεις εἰς τὴν ζωὴν εἰσελθεῖν, τήρει τὰς ἐντολάς. = And behold one approaching ...


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With regard to manuscripts of Mat. 19:16, no manuscript has 'good' in it twice. There is only one 'good' in verse 16. This is admitted to in one translation that puts 'good' in twice, in English: "Good. All the texts omit. The accounts here (vss.16-27, Mark 10:17-26, and Luke 18:18-28) are partly identical and partly complementary." The Companion ...


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The King New James concerning The New Testment was based on the Textus Receptus, and it's for Matthew 19:16: 16 And, behold, one came and said unto him, Good Master, what good thing shall I do, that I may have eternal life? (KJV) Well, the greek equivalent is from Textus Receptus: και ιδου εις προσελθων ειπεν αυτω διδασκαλε αγαθε τι αγαθον ποιησω ινα εχω ...


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The NKJV has this footnote for "Good[fn] Teacher": NU-Text omits Good. Similarly for "Why do you call Me good?[fn]": NU-Text reads Why do you ask Me about what is good?. It's all a matter of whether the translators favoured the NU-Text or the M-Text. NU-Text These variations from the traditional text generally represent the ...


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