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EZEKIEL'S TEMPLE & THE 'MILLENNIAL' PERSPECTIVE: The question posed is (as I understand it): “How does the ‘millennial’ interpretation of Ezekiel's temple prophecy, found in Ezekiel chapters 40-48, handle the details of those chapters, both with regard to the nature of the temple vision itself and how the temple rites and ceremonies, there described; ...


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A "Literal" Hermeneutic The grammatical-historical (literal) hermeneutic recognizes symbolism in language, but differs from symbolic and apocalyptic interpretations of Ezekiel's temple because of its commitment to take Scripture's communication at face value unless something clearly deems otherwise. So in Ezekiel's vision of the temple, the literal ...


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O λογος (The Word) , the subject in John 1:1, is a title of person, specifically of someone who is God (θεος). ὁ λόγος was one of the many titles of Jesus in the gospel of John. Jesus had the titles The Word, The Lamb, The Bread, The Light, The Door in the Johannine gospel (1:1, 1:14, 6:35, 8:12, 10:9). Neither word nor light nor door nor lamb nor bread is a ...


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"Word" (Logos) being capitalized by some versions is consistent with some versions capitalizing all of Jesus numerous titles. Here is a sample: Word, Word of God, Word of Life, John 1:1, 14, 1 John 1:1, Rev 19:13 First and Last, Rev 1:17, 22:13. Compare Isa 41:4, 44:6, 48:12 Emanuel, Matt 1:22 Savior, 2 Tim 1:10, Totus 1:4, 2:13, 3:6. Compare ...


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REVISED The metaphorical school of interpretation of Scripture is perhaps an organized reaction against the overly literal school of interpretation espoused by those generally well meaning folks who say quite vehemently and with an air of finality, "I believe the Bible is literally the Word of God!" In other words, there may (I repeat, may) be ...


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The Passover Lamb Conceptually, the Passover Lamb makes sense. It is chosen, without blemish, killed (and eaten) on the Passover, and it's blood is used to make the sign which will cause the house to be passed over. All of these would apply to Jesus. However, textually the Passover Lamb (ἀρήν) is different from the Lamb (ἀμνός) of God: GNT: καὶ ἐμβλέψας ...


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Why then would this more common, collective word for "hair" not appear instead of the former word (considering that both words are "singular" in form)? I think the why question is probably unanswerable as such. OP describes this odd situation very clearly so there is no need, then, to rehearse again the details provided in the question. There have been ...


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This question falls in to the category of "speculative translation". That is, a speculation about the meaning of word in a text based a conflated interpretation of the translation of the word into a non-cognate language and it's relation to another word on the non-cognate language. The answer to this type of question in almost all cases is "no&...


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No. The woman in Matt. 15:22-25 is from the land of Canaan, from the coastal region of northwest Palestine; therefor not of the lineage of Abraham. Mark's account (Mk. 7:24-28) calls her a Greek, or Syrophenician. The "lost sheep of the house of Israel" did not refer to a physical location of unknown people. They were lost spiritually, not ...


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This is not a quote from an ancient text. Bildad is just saying that ancient wisdom agrees with him that the wicked do not escape judgement. There are indeed a few quotes from ancient books in the bible but they are usually introduced (e.g., Num. 21:27) and sometimes even given a source (ibid verse 14), Bildad's words however do not fall neatly into this ...


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The Hebrew word you are referring to is, in Masoretic notation, חֹ֫שֶׁךְ - ḥōšěḵ.* The Septuagint reading is σκοτος - skotos (also the word used in Luke 23:44, which you cite). Strictly speaking, it is not the earth (אֶ֫רֶץ - ʾěrěṣ) but rather the deep (תְּהוֹם - tehôm) that is covered by the darkness. The understanding here was that the waters of the deep ...


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The verse appears as follows in the Greek New Testament. 1 Peter 4:6 (GNT) 6 εἰς τοῦτο γὰρ καὶ νεκροῖς εὐηγγελίσθη ἵνα κριθῶσι μὲν κατὰ ἀνθρώπους σαρκὶ ζῶσι δὲ κατὰ θεὸν πνεύματι. [NOTE: Arland et al. (2012) note no variants of this verse extant.] There are three verbs in this verse: εὐαγγελίζω = Aorist Passive Indicative (3 person singular) = "the ...


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I believe the historical context is indeed very helpful here. Ephesus circa AD 63 If 1 Timothy is a genuine epistle of Paul (see arguments that it is here and here pp.74-78), it was written sometime between Paul’s departure from Ephesus in ~AD 55 and his death which occurred no later than AD 68. My own Pauline chronology puts 1 Timothy’s composition between ...


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Paul advised Timothy in this first epistle on problems within the congregation and in manner of the assembly. 1 Tim. chap. 2 has been misunderstood by many as it is often lifted out of context. The entire chapter is a discussion of the manner of conduct in the assembly. The better translation of the English words is found in Young's Literal Translation. ...


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The BDAG states there are three meanings described (in part) as: ① last will and testament (so exclusively in Hellenistic times, Eger [s. 3 below] 99 note; exx. e.g. in Riggenbach 292ff; Behm 10, 1; 2; Philo, Joseph., Test12Patr; loanw. in rabb.) Hb 9:16f; δ. κεκυρωμένη a will that has been ratified Gal 3:15; cp. 17, where δ. shades into mng. 2 (s. κυρόω 1, ...


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What does justified in the spirit refer to in 1Timothy 3:16 According to the book "Truth in Translation" by Jason David BeDuhn , an associated professor of religious studies at Nothern Arizona University, a correct rendering is that of the NRSV which follows Paul's language without tempering with its meaning. (The NRSVACE, NCV and NRSV also follow the ...


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Acts 3:1 refers to the hour of prayer in the Jewish temple which was set at the 9th hour (IE: 3pm). Because of this precedent many Christian groups set an hour of prayer: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vespers However, the NT does not establish any such scheduled activities as a matter of "law" or required tradition.


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In the beginning, God created man in his own image, in the image of God created he him ; male and female created he them. Genesis 1:27 KJV. God expressed himself in his creation. There is something to be seen of God and his purposes in all that he made, for without the Word was not anything made that was made. Nothing was haphazard ; all was according to ...


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Understanding the Relationship between Man and Woman in the Marriage Covenant When a man marries a woman, the man becomes the woman’s owner, or “lord.”1 Likewise, the woman becomes the man’s possession since he owns her. Accordingly, in Rom. 7:3, when the apostle discusses the woman hypothetically (“if”) marrying another man, he writes, «ἐὰν γένηται ἀνδρὶ ...


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Usally in a hebrew sentce the noun (Jacob) stands forward and the apposition (My servant) behind. So Jes 44,1a ist typicall (Jacob, my servant). Jes 44,2 (My servant, Jacob) is also possible. Its uncommon but there is no diffrent meaning. Perhabs there ist a emphesis of an untypicall construction, but not more. You can have a look at Lettinga, J., Grammatik ...


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First and foremost, “Strong’s greek lexicon” is a misnomer. “Strong’s” is a concordance, not a lexicon. In order to be translated as “with,” the word following the preposition μετά would need to be declined in the genitive case (i.e., τούτου). Thayer,1 I. with the genitive; (the Sept. for אֵת, עִם, אַחַר, etc.), among, with (cf. Winer's Grammar, 376f (352f))...


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The Hebrew term appears in the OT in 2 Kings 1:2 Now Ahaziah had fallen through the lattice of his upper room in Samaria and injured himself. So he sent messengers, saying to them, "Go and consult Baal-Zebub, the god of Ekron, to see if I will recover from this injury." Strong's Concordance Baal Zebub: "Baal of flies," a Philistine god ...


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According to BDAG, Βεελζεβούλ was originally a Philistine deity; the name means Baal (lord) of flies (2 Kings 1:2, 6) ... in the NT Beelzeboul is prince of hostile spirits ἄρχοντι τῶν δαιμονίων Matt 12:24, Luke 11:15, etc. See also the appendix below for a very similar lexical entry. The word occurs just seven times in the NT and can be classified as ...


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While the context of the priesthood in the Torah supports translating בָּנָ֔יו (construct plural with pronominal suffix) as sons, the plural בָּנִ֖ים can be translated children. However, it is clearer when written as Gen. 5:4, בָּנִ֖ים וּבָנֽוֹת, sons and daughters. Gen. 31:28 has לְבָנַ֖י וְלִבְנֹתָ֑י, in which the context means grandsons/grandchildren ...


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The phrase in Greek is "το γαρ τι προσευξωμεθα" which is literally "the (thing) for which we-pray". When translating Greek, you have to take your best guess on the meaning because it's a bit less precise (or, more accurately, it's precise in different ways) than English. So some translators take "the for which" as "what" and some take "the for which" as "...


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This part of Romans is specifically dealing with the issue that the (Christian) Jews had with allowing gentiles into the Church. The Ten Tribes of Israel were divorced from God “Thus says the Lord: "Where is your mother's certificate of divorce, with which I sent her away? Or which of my creditors is it to whom I have sold you? Behold, for your ...


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In Matthew 7:12, the connection provided by "therefore" with the previous verses isn't as obvious as it could be. The previous verses: 9: Or what man is there of you, whom if his son ask bread, will he give him a stone? 10: Or if he ask a fish, will he give him a serpent? 11: If ye then, being evil, know how to give good gifts unto your children, how much ...


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One possibility is that Jesus is being compared to the Paschal sacrifice, which was a lamb (Exodus 12:3). Significantly for this interpretation, John records Jesus' crucifixion as having happened on the day of preparation for Passover at about noon (John 19:14), which was the same day the Passover was to be sacrificed (Exodus 12:6). John makes a further ...


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As correctly stated in the comments, in Classical Greek the preposition ἐν with the dative means “in”, while εἰς with the accusative means “into, towards”. However, in post-classical Greek the latter is increasingly used to mean “in”, for example in the Septuagint of Numbers 35,33: καὶ οὐ μὴ φονοκτονήσητε τὴν γῆν εἰς ἣν ὑμεῖς κατοικεῖτε “do not pollute ...


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